Wednesday, September 30, 2009

The Day footnoteMaven's Blog Died

~1~

There once was a blog among many.

It had withstood the test of time in the genealogy universe.

And t’was glorious — full of footnotes, family history, humor, pathos & such…

It was read, By some.

Missed, By more.

Still, Life was good.

~2~

Then along came a flood that washed over the blog and weighed it down.

A flood called Facebook, absorbing the blog into the collective.

Resistance was futile.

~3~

The blog struggled for time, eventually succumbing to a vociferous bird, by the name of Twitter;

Twitter fed on time. And thus, it consumed all fM had left, until the blog was no more.

And only the memories remained…


R.I.P.

footnoteMaven.com



Borrowed heavily from Twisted Intellect, thank you for the inspiration.

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Wedding In Montana

In contrast to Wedding In Nirvana, let me introduce you to Wedding in Montana.

The setting, the beautiful Blackfoot River, a favorite fishing spot of the bride and groom and the centerpiece of the movie A River Runs Through It. The field behind the river was one of the spots chosen by the Lewis and Clark Expedition to make camp on their way through Montana.

The wedding party, including Dennis who officiated, were all hunting, fishing and rafting compatriots. The dress was river's edge casual. The weather was the best Montana could hope to offer on a quiet Saturday in late September.

Our bride could not have been more beautiful, nor the groom more handsome. The vows included the "Palmer Amendment;" time to hunt and fish. And the bride, bless her, laughingly consented.

The mother of the groom held up well until the bride shed tears of love during the ceremony and then the mother of the groom was a goner.

Glasses of champagne were raised to the couple underneath the cover of a proud Lodgepole Pine surrounded by a chorus of waving Aspen. The father of the groom lent his 40 years of married wisdom to a toast to the couple, "Some say marriage is a 50 - 50 proposition, but it isn't. In marriage each partner must give 100% every day." The father of the bride congratulated both families on their good genes and new additions; while the mother of the bride read a traditional Irish toast.

You didn't expected fM to be quiet did you?
The mother of the groom thanked the bride for "Hell freezing over" (a reference to when she expected her son to get married) and getting her son to remove his fishing cap (he hasn't been seen without one since he was ten).

Surrounded by family and friends, it could not have been a more perfect Montana wedding.

Monday, September 28, 2009

The Best of fM - Hidden Sources - Alumni Records

I went to visit my favorite, out-of-the-way, dusty, creaky, quirky used bookstore in early January. I was looking for a book on the history of chairs to help me in dating old photographs.

I always hit the reference section of the store just in case a dictionary I don't own pops up. While looking through the reference books I came across a genealogical treasure trove. Four privately printed volumes containing information of the Harvard College Class of 1894. The volumes are: The Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Report - 1919, the Thirty-Fifth Anniversary - 1929, the Fortieth Anniversary - 1935, and the Harvard Alumni Directory of 1926. Each volume cost $2.50, so I had to buy them all. (Now you see why I love this bookstore.)


This view of Harvard College, drawn by Joseph Chadwick -
engraved by Paul Revere. It shows the College in about 1767.
From left are Holden Chapel, Hollis Hall, Harvard Hall, Stoughton Hall,
and Massachusetts Hall.

Excellent records are available for Harvard, as Harvard University is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States, having been founded 16 years after the arrival of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. (I have included some links to online historical information for Harvard at the end of this article.)

We are all connected to the past through our family relationships. But so often proof of that relationship or an understanding of the place and time in which our ancestors lived is difficult to find. These alumni reports are some of those hard to find records, as they were privately published and distributed to the members of the graduating class. I have often thought of yearbooks and the official records held by the schools and colleges, but I had no idea how much information was compiled by an alumni association.

These books contained photographs of every graduate, a biography written by the graduate himself (there are no women), lists of graduates and their degrees, works published, addresses and so much more. Some of the group photographs are absolutely priceless. They also have photographs of the first child and grandchild of the Class of 1894. As I said, a treasure trove.

The books I purchased were stamped; Alex Dickinson, Lowman Building, Seattle, Washington. Alex and his classmate Macy Millmore Skinner were the only members of the Class of 1894 to make their home in Seattle.


The Freshman Crew
ca. 1890

The Hasty Pudding Club
ca. 1894

A typical biographical entry in the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Report is the following entry for the book's original owner Alexander Dickinson including his senior portrait.


ALEXANDER DICKINSON

BORN
at Cambridge, Mass., March 29, 1871. Son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Taggart) Dickinson. PREPARED at Cambridge Latin School, Cambridge, Mass.
IN COLLEGE, 1890-94;
LAW SCHOOL, 1894-96. DEGREE: A.B. 1894.
MARRIED
to Juliet Agnes Wylie at Seabright, N.J., Sept. 3, 1910.
OCCUPATION: Law
ADDRESS:
*(home) 911 Summit Ave., Seattle, Wash.; (business) 1211 Hoge Bldg., Seattle, Wash.
AFTER graduation, practised law in Boston nine years. For the past thirteen years I have resided in the Puget Sound country, most of the time at Seattle, where I am now practising law, specializing in liability insurance. Among my clients are the Ocean Accident and Guarantee Corporation, Royal Indemnity Company, London and Kancashire Indemnity Company, and Queen Insurance Company. Seattle, to me, is an ideal place in which to live. It is beautiful from a scenic standpoint, has wonderful commercial possibilities, and is possessed of a fine climate. It also contains within its borders an unusual number of congenial college men, who manage to extract considerable enjoyment of life. My chief recreation is golf, playable, by the way, all year round. My war work was confined mainly to the draft as associate member local legal advisory board, and assisting in the various Liberty Loan campaigns.
XXXCLUBS AND SOCIETIES: Harvard Varsity Club, Seattle Harvard Club, (Trustee) University Club of Seattle, Seattle Gold Club.




Dickinson attended the Thirty-Fifth Anniversary in 1929 at Harvard. He was photographed and distinguished for his mileage.

Sundry members of the Class honored the celebration by making substantial pilgrimages to attend, ALLIE DICKINSON, journeying from far Seattle, having the best mileage to his credit.

According to the report, Alex's home address had changed to 128 Harvard Ave. N., Seattle, Wash.








For the Fortieth Anniversary Report
- 1934, Alex is listed in the section for obituaries, having died in Seattle, May 5, 1933. The following was a more recent photograph and his obituary.


ALEXANDER DICKINSON was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 29, 1871, and died at Seattle, Washington, May 5, 1933. After graduating from college in 1894 he attended the Harvard Law School, and thereafter practiced law for a time with his brother, David Dickinson, in Boston.

Like many another enterprising New Englander, however, he finally determined to try his fortune in the newer and less congested regions of the Western United States.

Early in the present century he took up his abode and re-began the practice of his profession in Seattle. He liked his new residence from the start and never regretted the change. He joined the University Club at Seattle soon after settling there and built up a circle of congenial friends, among whom he soon found himself very much at home. His only entry into public life -- if such it may be called -- was during the year of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition there (1909) when he had charge of the Forestry Building, a splendid exhibit of one of the fundamental industries of the rapidly developing region.

Shorly after this he married Mrs. Juliet Wylie Leech, a young widow, daughter of the well-known physician, Dr. W. Gill Wylie of New York City, whom he had known since his college days. This proved to be another fortunate "experiment," and resulted in realizing that apparently not-too-frequent outcome referred to in the story-books of our early youth as "living happily ever after."

"Allie," as he was affectionately known to most of his early and later friends, was always a devoted follower of out-door sports, and his four successful years as first baseman on the Harvard nine will be happily, not to say enthusiastically, remembered by most members of '94. While he continued an addict of baseball for some years after moving to Seattle, he later abandoned it in favor of the less strenuous recreation of golf, of which, also, he became a skillful and ardent follower. He was naturally easy and graceful at such things and never seemed to be hurried or worried in the least, whatever the situation. Indeed, he has a far finer coordination between brain and body than the average man; of a quality akin to that of the sleight-of-hand- artist. He was always attracted by the exhibition of such skills in others, and frequently essayed imitating various tricks which he witnessed on the vaudeville stage or elsewhere, with considerable success. He also took part occasionally in amateur theatrical productions; especially in the Christmas plays put on yearly at the Seattle University Club, of which he wrote several himself.

Of a quiet, sociable disposition, however, he never cared greatly for the "spotlight." As he was also eminently a reasonable human being, and very appreciative of humor and good stories, of which he had a large fund himself, his undying popularity with those who knew him well is easily understood. He was one of those "good-fellows" who do not exceed the limits of temperance and good taste in the pursuit of the fun of living: nor did it ever occur to him to abandon his innately strong predilection for the standard decencies of human existence.

He died as the result of an embolism after a surgical operation for the removal of the gall bladder, at the moment when he was headed for a normal recovery. His widow, but no children, survives him.

Although his career had nothing of the spectacular in it, the members of '94, among whom he had a wide acquaintance, can feel nothing but an unfeigned and deep regret at his untimely departure. For he was a most likely, kindly spirit -- a mens sana in corpore sano -- with keen appreciation of the beauties of nature and a distinctive love of those minor charms of human existence which do so much to soften its asperities and ameliorate its sterner realities; a fundamental type of human wisdom that is all too rare in this over-practical, modern American life of ours.

So I propose as a last toast to one we loved:

Sapientem A. D. te mortuum salutamus!
R. S. K.

My Latin isn't good but the toast appears to be "Wise A.D. (Alex Dickinson) in death we salute you! This is very crude so if your Latin is good please feel free to correct me.

I would like to offer to scan and email photos, biographies or obituaries to any interested family historian with an ancestor in the Harvard College Class of 1894. Please email me with your request. I hope I can do a good turn for my fellow historians out there searching for information.

Links to Harvard Historical Information:

The Harvard Guide - History, Lore and More

The Harvard University Archives

Harvard University. Quinquennial Catalogue of the officers and graduates 1636-1930. Cambridge : The University, 1930.

Sources - Photographs, Illustrations, Text:

Committee Of The Harvard College Class of 1894,
Twentieth Anniversary Report 1894 - 1919 (Number VII). Norwood, Massachusetts: Plimpton Press, 1919.

Committee Of The Harvard College Class of 1894,
Thirty-fifth Anniversary Report 1894 - 1929 (Number X). Norwood, Massachusetts: Plimpton Press, 1928.

Committee Of The Harvard College Class of 1894,
Fortieth Anniversary Report 1894 - 1934 (Number XI). Norwood, Massachusetts: Plimpton Press, 1934.

Friday, September 25, 2009

The Best of fM - Lillian Salter - Public School 69


Certificate of Graduation


Lillian E. Salter


Lillian E. Salter, my grandmother, was the only child of Louis Salter, the Superintendent of Carnegie Hall. She graduated from Public School 69, an elementary school, on January 31, 1912. You can see her graduation certificate above.

Lillian shared the same penchant for collecting autographs as did her father. Upon her graduation, Lillian collected the autographs of her fellow classmates in a small autograph book left to me by my mother.

The sentiments reflect the times - a kinder, gentler time. I am fortunate to have the autograph book and would love to find the descendants of some of those who signed, so that they could have a copy of what their ancestor wrote. If you are a descendant, please email the footnoteMaven, and I will gladly send you a digital copy of what was written.


A Page From Her Autograph Book



To Lillian
When twilight draws her curtain,
And pins it with a star,
Remember that you have a friend,
Though she may wander far,
Your loving friend,
Bella Kaufmann


In the paths of life,
If you need an umbrella,
May you have to uphold it,
A handsome young fellow.
Sincerely yours,
Muriel G. Hewitt
(coming to lunch)


1/25/12
To Lillian:
Never forget the fellow that
played center on 69 Basketball
Team - And the battles won.
Daniel Long
P.S. 69
(one of only two male classmates who signed)


Lillian's female classmates:

Rebecca C. Beuowitz
Esther Burll
Violet Heaslip
Elizabeth Lucey
Alice Sangster
Bella Kaufmann
Mary Cepriano
Amy Huston
Marian Manley
Jovita Weehas
Agnes Bahr
Frances Cohen
Marguerite Kerr
May McGuiness
Lottie Wendel
Edna Boyce
Alice Doyle
Nellie Savin
Hellen Moore
Ottilie Sensmig
Agnes Brownw
Marion Eiter
Esther Lieberman
Martha Prevot
Susan Haight
Marion A. Smith
Ida Bennett

Saturday, September 19, 2009

R.I.P. At The COG

81st EDITION OF THE COG



The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is:


Your Genealogy Blog's Obituary

- ¤ -

If your blog ended or was lost/deleted today, how would you write it's obituary?

- ¤ -

What were the highlights of your blog?

- ¤ -

What is its history?

- ¤ -

How do you want to be remembered?

- ¤ - ¤ -

The Deadline For Submissions Is
October 1, 2009
Hosted By Schelly Talalay Dardashti
Tracing the Tribe


- ¤ - ¤ -

Attention All COG Participants

Please use a descriptive phrase in the title of any articles you plan to submit and/or write a brief description/introduction to your articles in the "comment" box of the blogcarnival submission form. This will give readers an idea of what you've written about and hopefully interest them in clicking on your link. Introductions for your articles will not be provided for you due to the volume of articles submitted. Thank you!

Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 81st Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Meet Me In St. Louis, Louis

Meet Me At The Fair
Don't Tell Me The Lights Are Shining
Anyplace But There
We Will Dance The Hootchie-kootchie
I Will Be Your Tootsie-wootsie
If You Will Meet Me In St. Louis, Louis
Meet Me At The Fair!

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition, also know as the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair, marked the 100th anniversary of the Louisiana Purchase. The decision that the fair be held in St. Louis was fitting. In 1904, St. Louis was the fourth largest city in the country and part of the land that had been covered by the Treaty.

Between April 30 and December 1, 1904, 20,000,000 fairgoers experienced the never before seen wonders that captivated fairgoers. One of those fairgoers was my Grandfather, Otey Reed Campbell. Grandfather lived ninety miles south of St. Louis in St. Francois County. He was a 26 year old single man courting my Grandmother in 1904. He traveled to St. Louis for the fair during a time when few traveled more than a short distance from their homes.

The Fair was filled with Palaces, grand buildings housing exhibits of electric lights, automobiles, aircraft, and moving pictures. My Grandfather encountered the people and cultures of foreign lands. Here only, because to my knowledge he never left this country much less traveled outside the surrounding states.

The amusements on the Pike caught his attention. Everyone left the Fair with stories to tell friends and families; memories that lasted a lifetime. In my Grandfather's case more than a lifetime. The story of his love of the Ferris, or Observation, wheel is well know in our family to this day.

Observation/Ferris Wheel

"This wasn't just any Ferris wheel," my Grandfather would recount to his children. No, this Ferris Wheel was so large you could load a standing mule into one of the observation cars. You should know that in Missouri almost everything is equated to a mule. We're known for them.

One of the best ways to get a birds-eye-view of the Fair was to buy a ticket to ride on the Ferris wheel. It is said that my Grandfather bought several tickets, he was so taken with the ride. Each of the wheel's 36 cars could carry sixty passengers to a dizzying height of 250 feet. Yes, if you could get sixty people in the car there would certainly be room for that standing mule. He even recounted the story of one couple who were married while riding on the Wheel.

Interior - Observation Cars

Each car had an attendant who was assigned to calm passengers when a surprise storm approached or when electricity to the wheel went out and the wheel stopped moving.

The wheel was named for its inventor, George Washington Gale Ferris. It first appeared at the Chicago Columbian Exposition in 1893 and was transported from that city to St. Louis in 175 freight cars.

The saddest part of this family story is that at the end of the Fair they dismantle the Ferris wheel using dynamite. Years later some pieces of the Ferris wheel were dug up in Forest Park. How I wish they had preserved it or even one of the observation cars. If one survived, I'd love to know.

Sources:

Photographs:

Otey Reed Campbell. Desloge Photographer. Card Mounted Photograph. ca. 1904. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, Preston, Washington. 2007.

Observation Wheel. Anonymous. Card Mounted Photograph. 1904. Celebrating The Louisiana Purchase. St. Louis Public Library.

Giant steel cobwebs. Anonymous. Stereo Card. 1904. Celebrating The Louisiana Purchase. St. Louis Public Library.

Sunday, September 13, 2009

Saturday Night GeneaFun


Yes, Randy Seaver of GeneaMusings has another Saturday night GeneaFun/Challenge. This weekend we are to make our own Genealogy/GeneaBlogger Trading Card. Here's mine!

As usual, I didn't play by the rules. I didn't use the prescribed form because I want to turn this into my next Moo, which will be a set of business cards. The pertinent information will go on the back.

Hey Randy! Thanks for the fun!

Follow The Parade To The COG

80th Edition of The COG


The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is:


Family Fun!

- ¤ -

Research an event your ancestor may have attended.

- ¤ -

Did your ancestor live within a few blocks of the parade route for
the annual Fourth of July parade in the town where they lived?

- ¤ -

If your family lived in a rural area, perhaps they attended a county or state fair.

- ¤ -

If they lived in a big city, perhaps they attended a play or movie opening.

- ¤ -

Was there an amusement park or traveling carnival near the area
your family was from, one they might have visited?

- ¤ -


Were there fireworks displays in the town your family was from?

- ¤ -

How much do you know about the types of entertainment
your ancestors might have enjoyed?

- ¤ - ¤ -

The Deadline For Submissions Is
September 15, 2009



- ¤ - ¤ -

Attention All COG Participants

Please use a descriptive phrase in the title of any articles you plan to submit and/or write a brief description/introduction to your articles in the "comment" box of the blogcarnival submission form. This will give readers an idea of what you've written about and hopefully interest them in clicking on your link. Introductions for your articles will not be provided for you due to the volume of articles submitted. Thank you!

Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 80th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.

Friday, September 11, 2009

Eight Years Ago Today


This country's collective tragedy of 9/11 is far more vivid in my mind than where I was and what I was doing eight years ago today. What happened to me that day blurs. The impressions of the events on the East Coast have taken over as my memory. While they are far more clear than what happened to me that day, I have tried to recount what was my personal experience eight years ago today 9/11.



It was early in the morning here on the West Coast. I was in Portland. I was attending my masters of law program and was renting a house off campus with three young men, all first year law students. I was still in bed when my daughter called. I was listening to her describe what was happening, when the young man from New York started banging on our bedroom doors. At the same time he was trying desperately to reach his family back home from his cell phone.

We all got up and gathered in the living room. No television, we were huddled around a small radio I had taken from my room. "Who would do this," one of the young men asked? "Osama Bin Laden would be my prime candidate," I answered. Then one of the other boys proceeded to explain how this was our fault based on our foreign policy.

A foreign policy lecture? Our fault? This was not the time or the place. I went to my room to get dressed. My husband called, he was watching TV when the second plane hit. He wanted me to come home. I told him I'd drive on campus and see what the schedule was and let him know. My daughter called again. Her company was headquartered in the World Trade Center. There was no contact with the people she spoke to every day and it would be days before she knew the fate of several in the WTC who had been friends. She was shaken and wanted me to come home.

Everything seemed to be in fast motion that morning. People moved faster, talked faster. Not quite panic, but certainly not calm. By the time I arrived at the Dean's office I had heard about the Pentagon. The law school was hosting a federal judges conference that day and I recognized what were surely FBI agents.

Not a good day to have that many federal judges in one spot I thought. The conference was canceled. By now, I just wanted to go home. The school left the decision to each student as to whether or not they would leave campus. I knew nothing would be accomplished in class and that my family needed my support and I theirs. I started for home.

Home was not just around the corner. Home was a three and a half hour drive. During the drive I heard from each of my children and my husband several times. About two hours into the drive I became ill. When I arrived in town I drove straight to the Emergency Room where my husband met me. I spent the night in the hospital, probably the only person in the country who had not seen any of the coverage on television. Probably best, one of my nurses had assured me.

The next days would make up for that. Some of it vivid to this day. I have heard people say they try to put those images out of their mind. I do not. I consciously try to remember them. I remember them often. The young girl holding up the photograph of her father pleading for help in finding him, exhausted rescuers covered in dust, those who chose to jump to their deaths, and the collapse of a landmark, a symbol, our security. I remember. I will always remember.


From a 2007 post.
TheEnd

Thursday, September 10, 2009

The 40 Best Genealogy Blogs - Ah!


Diane Haddad of the Insider Blog at Family Tree Magazine commented on the original footnoteMaven article "The 40 Best Genealogy Blogs - Hmmm!" and posted a new Insider article clarifying the Family Tree Top 40 process. Here is my understanding of the steps into how the "list" of Family Tree Top 40 will be compiled:

1 - Genealogy community nominates from Sept. 3 to 30.

a. Nominate yourself

b. Nominate others

c. Nominate as many as you like as long as one at a time. (Does not clarify how often you may vote for yourself or others.)

d. Blog must related to family history in some way

e. No predetermined limit to how many nominees will be included in voting. (See 2 e. & 2f. below)

2 - Family Tree disqualifies, eliminates and categorizes


a. Disqualify nomination if:

* It isn’t primarily about genealogy.

* The blogger doesn’t post original content (for example, if he/she simply aggregates feeds from other blogs).

* The blog is no longer updated, or does not post new content on a regular basis (say, at least once a week).

b. Eliminate nomination if:

* Lack of post Quality (Rampant misspellings and poor language)

* Paid services blogs used primarily as a marketing tool

* Blogs consisting strictly of advertising content

c. Categories created after nominations, disqualifications and eliminations

d. No predetermined limit to how many nominees will be included in voting

e. Blogs receiving one or a few nominations won't be kept out of the voting (Provided they meet the above)

f. Being nominated many times will probably indicate a blog many people are reading

3 - Genealogy community votes from Oct. 5 to Nov. 5.

a. 80 top vote-getting blogs make it through to a “final” round

b. Voting alone won’t determine which blogs are featured in the Family Tree Top 40

4 - Family Tree names the Top 40 blogs from the Top 80 blogs

a. Editorial staff will select 40 blogs from list of 80 top vote-getting blogs

Family Tree Magazine has created a new graphic for those who wish to foster a sense of community in the nomination process.


Again, thank you Family Tree Magazine for embarking on an endeavor to recognize the growing segment of the genealogy community that blogs about genealogy and family history.

Vote!
Let's see our favorite genealogy blogs in
Family Tree Magazine May 2010.

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

The 40 Best Genealogy Blogs - Hmmm!


Diane Haddad of the Insider Blog at Family Tree Magazine announced the following:

Do you have a favorite few genealogy blogs that you read regularly? Maybe the blogger offers excellent genealogy advice, insightful analysis or a unique point of view. Or the writing especially creative or humorous.

If so, we want to know about it. In the May 2010 issue, we’ll be naming the Family Tree Magazine 40 Best Genealogy Blogs (“Family Tree 40” for short).

First, we’re asking the genealogy community to nominate the genealogy blogs they read most. Later, family historians will vote on their favorite blogs in several categories.

The nomination period is from Sept. 3 to 30. You can nominate as many blogs as you want (one at a time), your own included, as long as each blog is related to family history in some way.

Voting will take place from Oct. 5 to Nov. 5.

Thank you Family Tree Magazine for embarking on an endeavor to recognize the growing segment of the genealogy community known as GeneaBloggers. I believe it is long overdue by the real world genealogy publications. That said, I have a few questions and I am not trying to be a wet blanket.

1. Do you have a favorite few genealogy blogs that you read regularly? You can nominate as many blogs as you want (one at a time), your own included, as long as each blog is related to family history in some way.

Question:

I just checked Chris Dunham's (The Genealogue) Genealogy Blog Finder and he is tracking 1,413 genealogy blogs.

Each blog votes for itself and let's say 10 others. That would be 15,543 nominations (now of course we know there will be duplicates and some of the 1,413 blogs are not active. I'm no math wizard, nor do I know anything about probabilities, so I can only guess at that number). So I'm choosing 1,000 to work with.

Now we, your readers, thought enough of these blogs to nominate them. Will we vote on each of the 1,000 nominations or will Family Tree Magazine cull them into say 200 blogs to vote on? If we aren't voting on all the blogs nominated, how will FTM determine those 200 blogs? Nominated the most number of times? Family Tree Magazine's favorites of the nominations? Just asking. And I will disclose that I am nominating my Top 40.

2. Family historians will vote on their favorite blogs in several categories.

Question:

What are those categories? Are they the teasers written in Diane's post? (Maybe the blogger offers excellent genealogy advice, insightful analysis or a unique point of view. Or the writing especially creative or humorous.)

Or, are the categories the product of the descriptions we wrote as to why we nominated certain blogs? I find it so difficult to pigeon hole genealogy blogs. Look at the questions below and insert a blog name. You could probably answer yes for all of the blogs you've nominated.

Does [Blog Name] offer excellent genealogy advice? Does [Blog Name] display insightful analysis? Does [Blog Name] offer a unique point of view? Is [Blog Name's] writing especially creative or humorous.

Example:

Does GeneaMusings offer excellent genealogy advice? Absolutely! Does GeneaMusings display insightful analysis? Always! Does GeneaMusings offer a unique point of view?Absolutely! Is GeneaMusings writing especially creative or humorous. I think so!

At one time or another Randy has been all those things. So what category of blog does this make Randy Seaver's GeneaMusings? Especially when determined after the fact. Do you see my point?

I truly wish I had known those categories before nominating. I would have structured my nominations to the categories, not the categories to the nominations. The only way it can be done now, and a way that could leave some very deserving (round peg in a square hole) blogs wanting if all nominations are not up for a vote.

3. Voting will take place from Oct. 5 to Nov. 5.

Question:

Will I only have one vote per category? Will I have forty votes? Inquiring voters want to know.

4. Family Tree Magazine has provided the following badge:




Hey bloggers, want to garner nominations from your readers?
Post this icon on your blog and link back to http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/40bestnominations.


I will participate and promote this project wholeheartedly. However, I am uncomfortable with a "nominate me" badge. I am posting an altered form of the badge here on footnoteMaven and on Shades Of The Departed.


I am asking everyone who reads this to participate. Nominate your favorite GeneaBlogs! Support our band of GeneaBloggers! Vote if you have a blog, vote if you are a blog reader! Each and every one contributes to a terrific online experience. There is no more generous group of bloggers online.

And support Family Tree Magazine for taking on this project. As you can see, this will not be an easy task.