Friday, July 24, 2009

Lisa Louise Cooke - Bless Her - Interviews The footnoteMaven

A big thank you to Lisa Louise Cooke (Genealogy Gems Podcast & Genealogy Gems News) for inviting me to be a guest on her podcast. The interview is today's post and podcast entitled Genealogy Blogging Wisdom: Be Youself - Everyone Else Is Already Taken.

Lisa, the Diva of the podcast, is an extremely skilled interviewer. She has the ability to put you at ease, become your best friend, and convince you you're just hanging out and getting in some girl talk; in the space of a few short minutes. That's real talent!

It was my privilege to spend some time with Lisa. She is as beautiful on the inside as she is on the outside. The Pacific Northwest misses you Lisa, come back for a visit! I'll leave the lights on for you.

Saturday, July 18, 2009

The COG Invites Disaster!

79th Edition of The COG


The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is:


Disaster

- ¤ -

As human beings, our very existence is proof of the survival skills, faith, or just plain luck our ancestors possessed in order to persevere through millenia of disasters: epidemics, wars, pestilences, famines, accidents, and acts of nature.

- ¤ -

Tell about a disaster that one or more of your ancestors lived through.

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Did they survive a hurricane, flood, tornado, train wreck, sinking ship, plague, genocide, explosion, mine collapse, or some other terrible event?

- ¤ -

How did they survive?

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Research the details of the disaster and explain how it affected your ancestor (guilt, fear, faith, gratitude, etc.), your family's history, and even yourself!

- ¤ - ¤ -

The Deadline For Submissions Is
August 1, 2009
Hosted by Miriam at AnceStories

Tip: Check out GenDisasters and historical newspapers
to get more details about the event.

- ¤ - ¤ -

Attention All COG Participants

Please use a descriptive phrase in the title of any articles you plan to submit and/or write a brief description/introduction to your articles in the "comment" box of the blogcarnival submission form. This will give readers an idea of what you've written about and hopefully interest them in clicking on your link. Introductions for your articles will not be provided for you due to the volume of articles submitted. Thank you!

Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 76th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

Summer fling, don't mean a thing, but uh-oh those summer nights!

As a teenager, I was a serial dater. Or so my sister likes to say of me. Hey, it was a small town. There weren't that many boys. There is, however, always one.

It was summer and summer was the time for dating. Mine LaMott Lake, the Corral Drive-In Theater, and the stock car races. How I loved those summer nights.

In every young woman's dating life there is a defining moment. The moment when the hottest guy in town asks you out and elevates your dating stock. I had that moment the summer between my Junior and Senior years in high school. And I had it in front of witnesses.

It was a Thursday and my Mother wanted to go into town to buy a pair of shoes. I had my hair in those enormous rollers we wore to make our hair straight. Mother didn't drive, I would be driving. But, my hair wasn't dry and mother didn't allow me to be seen in public in rollers. My mother didn't let me chew gum in public either. She had her standards.

So, I had to dry my hair before we left. I would soon thank heaven for Mother's standards. We drove into town and parked across the street from the shoe store. Dad's cousin owned the shoe store located in the basement of the only drug store in town. The drug store was a local hangout. It had booths and a counter where they served food, soda, and ice cream. It was summer, the drugstore was full. It was also late afternoon and everyone with a car was already "shooting the strip." Town was uncommonly busy.

I parked the car directly across the street from the drug store. Mom and I were standing on the far side of the street waiting for the traffic to pass when he came out of the drug store. He waved. I waved back. "Hey," he yelled. "Are you doing anything Friday night?" He didn't wait for my reply. Why would he, no one ever turned him down. "Want to go to the stock car races?"

I smiled. Was he talking to me? My heart was pounding and I was blushing. I composed myself. Then I heard the sound of my own voice saying, "Sure, call me and let me know what time." I sounded calm. I had not embarrassed myself.

Cars stopped on the street were now blowing their horns at us. Everyone was listening. He turned and got into that beautiful vintage car he drove. One more wave as he backed up and drove down the street. I had never felt like that before or since.

"Nice boy," my mother said. Even she knew who he was.

It has been many years since that exchange. I don't remember our date as much as I remember that moment. And when a warm summer breeze blows through my hair, it is yesterday and that moment and I smile. I smile for the girl who got a date with him.



My contribution to the 76th Carnival of Genealogy - How I spent My Summer Vacation.

Sunday, July 12, 2009

The Good Old Summertime!

76th Edition of The COG


The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is:


How I spent my summer vacation...

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A favorite summer memory from your youth?

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Tell us what summers were like when you were a wee tad pole.
Did you vacation with family?

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Go to a youth camp? Hang out at the local park?

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Watch fireworks? Catch fireflies?

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Share those lazy, hazy, crazy, days of summers past with us!

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The Deadline For Submissions Is
July 15, 2009



- ¤ - ¤ -

Attention All COG Participants

Please use a descriptive phrase in the title of any articles you plan to submit and/or write a brief description/introduction to your articles in the "comment" box of the blogcarnival submission form. This will give readers an idea of what you've written about and hopefully interest them in clicking on your link. Introductions for your articles will not be provided for you due to the volume of articles submitted. Thank you!

Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 76th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.

Friday, July 10, 2009

Sticks And Stones Will Break My Back

Olive Suter Palmer
Born 26 December 1895 - Neligh, NE
Died 31 May 1989 - Ronan, MT

This is my "They Worked Hard For The Family" submission to Smile For The Camera. Now I'm certain you're asking yourself, just what occupation does this photograph of little Olive depict. It's not Olive's occupation that we're looking for in this photograph. The significance lies in its' background.

It's that huge pile of sticks that has been the cause of much discussion in my husband's family when viewing this photograph of Olive. There have been many creative guesses as to what that pile of sticks in the background might be. Then my husband's uncle delivered the photograph below. It solved the mystery. All guesses were wrong.

Lewis Henry Suter
Born 15 March 1850 - Somerset Co., PA
Died 1 May 1930 - Salem, OR

As you can see from this photograph, little Olive was placed on the ledge half-way up the mound of sticks with her rocker, dolls, pull cart, and afghan. Then her photograph was taken.

This huge mound of sticks is startling; particularly when you notice the absence of forests surrounding the mound or in the background. I've never seen anything like this accumulation of stove wood. How long did it take to cut and stack?

The need for it, however, makes perfect sense. Houses were heated by fireplaces and wood burning stoves in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The Suter's home had three fireplaces. They needed stove wood to live through the harsh winters in Nebraska. Lewis Suter worked very hard to provide his family with the security of having enough stove wood to survive the winter. But where are the trees that resulted in this huge mound of stove wood?

Written on the back of the photograph is the explanation of how "sticks can break the farmer's back."

Cottonwood - Planted by Lewis Henry Suter
on the homestead in Neligh, Neb.

Picture was taken 1895 - 96

Grandma Palmer's dad, Lewis Suter, carried the little trees
from the river, seven miles away, on his back and planted
them when they were small. When they got bigger he cut them for stove wood.

This would be your "Great Grandpa" Suter

~

Yes, he worked hard for the family.




Sources:

Olive Suter. Cabinet Card. ca. 1900. W.G. Suter. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, Preston, Washington. 2007.
Lewis Henry Suter. Card Mounted Photograph. ca. 1895-96. Anonymous. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, Preston, Washington. 2007.