Thursday, April 30, 2009

Widow's Weeds


She wears the widow's weeds,
She gives the widow's mite.
At home a while, she in the autumn finds
The sea an object for reflecting minds,
And change for tender spirits; there she reads,
And weeps in comfort in her graceful weeds.


They were called Widow's Weeds, the dress of the recently widowed. Many have, incorrectly, ascribed the name to the fact that no bright colors were worn and the dark hues were closer to the weed than the flower.


You'll find the rest of this article from the History Hare in
the Graveyard Rabbit Online Journal.

Friday, April 24, 2009

This Old House - COG 71

71st Edition of The COG


The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is:


"Local History"


As genealogists, we are used to tracing our ancestors and
the history of the places they lived.


- ¤ -

Not all of us live where our ancestors did.

- ¤ -

Do we take the time to see the history all around us?

- ¤ -

Use some of your investigative skills to research the
house, street, or town/city where YOU live.

- ¤ -

Write about an interesting person, place, or event of local history.

- ¤ - ¤ -

The Deadline For Submissions Is
May 1, 2009

(This edition of the COG will be hosted by
Donna at What's Past is Prologue. )


Attention All COG Participants

Please use a descriptive phrase in the title of any articles you plan to submit and/or write a brief description/introduction to your articles in the "comment" box of the blogcarnival submission form. This will give readers an idea of what you've written about and hopefully interest them in clicking on your link. Introductions for your articles will not be provided for you due to the volume of articles submitted. Thank you!

Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 71st Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.



Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Earth Day - Birthday


Yes, the Earth and I are celebrating. Contrary to what my children think, I am not as old or as round as Mother Earth.

Last year I wrote about sharing this day with the Earth, but actually, the Earth shares the day with me. It didn't get its day until 1970, I got mine a bit earlier.

I'm going to spend the day having lunch with my daughters and seeing a movie. There is no better birthday than one spent with family. I might even get some new fodder for blogging.

I'm was also quite pleased to learn from Janice Brown last year that this is "Ancestor's Eve," its designation thanks to Neelix of Star Trek Voyager. We miss you, Janice!

So today I opened my eyes to Mr. Maven, Zoe, and Hunter singing their rendition of "Happy Birthday." (Or was that Happy Anniversary.) Now that's worth opening your eyes and ears for today.

Monday, April 20, 2009

How To Write The History of a Family - A Guide To Genealogists - 1887


I found this book so interesting that I thought I'd share an excerpt with you.

It is evident the perception of the Genealogist/Family Historian hasn't changed much since 1887.

However, I have always thought that through education programs that set standards for research, writing, and production; and that teach the skill sets necessary to achieve those results, we will improve not only how others view us, but how we view ourselves. Seems my ideas aren't new either.
In this little volume it is scarcely necessary to vindicate the study of genealogy against those who assert that it is but an idle pursuit, for it may be presumed that those only will consult it who are already persuaded of the utility of preserving their family history. The reverence which is almost universally shown toward ancestors is but an extension of the commandment. "Honor thy father and they mother." All races of men seem to possess an instinctive feeling that a line of honorable ancestry is a subject for legitimate pride.

"Who are these graves we know not,
Only know they are our fathers."

But though many affect to jest at what they call "pedigree-hunting" there are few who do not feel more or less interested in knowing something of their own family history, however humble it may be; and that this is so is shown by the increasing number of those who now take some pains to trace it out and place it on permanent record.

Genealogy in the past was chiefly confined to tabular pedigrees, more remarkable for an imposing array of names and titles than for any just claim to be termed history. Still, a few family memorials worthy of the name were compiled as early as the seventeenth century, such for example, as the splendid history of the "Lives of the Berkeleys, written by John Smyth, of Nibley, about the year 1618. The independent family memoir, however, is a product almost exclusively of modern growth and though some valuable examples have been issued in England, it is in the United States that they are most numerous.

The necessity of accuracy and method is specially insisted on, and the reader's attention is drawn to the advantage of uniting the narrative with key-tables by means of a definite system of cross references, a combination which hitherto has been too much neglected by genealogists.

W.P.W. Phillimore, M.A., B.C.L.
How To Write The History of a Family
A Guide for Genealogists
1887

Saturday, April 18, 2009

Happy Anniversary Mr. Maven

Today Mr. Maven and I celebrate our 39th wedding anniversary. As you can see from our photograph we were just children when we got married.

My husband, the romantic, greeted me this morning with, "Happy Anniversary! Thirty-nine years! It seems like thirty-nine minutes . . . underwater."

How I love this man!

The proposal was equally romantic. "I'm going to tell you something you're not going to like it. I love you and I want to marry you." How could I resist that?

When I was young and unmarried my sister labeled me a serial dater. I could not image being with the same man for thirty-nine days much less thirty-nine years. And some of those I dated didn't get thirty-nine minutes.

My husband and I met in a car pool that took us to work at the Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego. It seems I was the only member of the five person car pool who didn't know that Mr. Maven drove two hours out of his way every day just to ride in that car pool with me.

Mr. Maven and I started our relationship as friends. Eventually, I realized that while I could live without him, I didn't want to. We are still friends and while I don't want to live without him, I've come to realize I can't live without him.

We were married in a Wedding Chapel in Arizona by a magistrate named Ersel Byrd. The sign in front of the Chapel read, Byrd's the Word. On our twentieth wedding anniversary we called Ersel to thank him. "How long has it been," he asked. "Twenty years," we answered. "Wait a moment," he said. "I have to get my book. I mark down all of my couples that have made it in my book." When he came back on the phone he said, "I remember you two, my wife and I knew that day you'd make it."

It's official. It's in the book. Yes, we've made it and then some. How could I have been so smart as to marry this man; the perfect man for me? I don't know, but thank God I did.

Happy Anniversary Mr. Maven! I love you more.

Thursday, April 16, 2009

Just One Precious Childhood Memory


I never really knew my Uncle Edward. I saw him on only three short occasions in my life. Most of what I know of him came from the stories my Mother told me. That and television.

I met him once when I was a toddler and my Mother and I traveled to New York for my christening. I remember nothing of that meeting. I met him once when I was about seven and he traveled to Missouri to visit us; a vivid memory. And I met him once as a young woman when we traveled to his home in New York; a trip to the World's Fair.

I can tell you more about the Vice Consulate General of Persia's son then I can my Uncle. I met the young man at the World's Fair in the days before you didn't speak to strangers. As a young woman I was far more interested in the darkly handsome college boy who was a basketball star and came from places I'd never heard of than I was interested in any of my relatives. More's the shame. Another missed opportunity.

Uncle Edward was my Mother's older brother. First Edward, then Mother, Julie, Lucy, and Richard. Mother and Edward were very close in age and she was more emotionally attached to Edward than to any of her other siblings.

She was his muse when he took up the camera in the shadow of his father. Many of her high school and high society photographs were taken by him. She was the subject of many of his photographic and career experiments.

Mother always spoke of how handsome he was, how bright, and successful. He had married the beautiful Alicia, model beautiful Alicia, who had the enviable profession of being a buyer for Bergdorf's. Mother loved repeating his success stories.

Although most of you don't personally know my Uncle Edward, you may recognize his work from the commercials of your childhood. He is the adman who created the Wonder bread commercials where the lights go on in the baker's home before we all get up. He used my Grandparent's home in that commercial. And he was also the architect of the first Safeguard shower scenes. As a teenager I was more familiar with commercials than I was regularly scheduled programming. Uncle Edward's new commercials were a reason to gather around the rarely used television.

As a young child in grade school, Edward was struck down by polio. Poliomyelitis was still a deadly disease in the 1920s. In Uncle Ed's polio, the respiratory muscles were paralyzed, and he was placed on a new invention called the iron lung.

My Great Grandparents were rather wealthy for the times. They stepped in and purchased an iron lung that was placed in the parlor. A nurse was hired, as was a maid to care for the other children. Polio also caused the wasting away of muscles. My Great Grandparents hired a Swedish masseuse to massage Uncle Edward's limbs in an effort to prevent the wasting. She worked on the frail ill little boy every day.

My Mother said she had to run out into the street and cover her ears so she wouldn't have to hear him scream. She read to him, played with him, joked with him as he lay in the iron lung. It was during this time she decided to become a nurse.

The efforts to save my Uncle Edward were successful and he returned to school several years behind and a member of my Mother's class. They became even closer; she was his protector.

But those are her memories. I have my one vivid memory of my Mother's favorite brother to recount for you.

We had cleaned for weeks knowing Uncle Edward would be visiting. My mother was an operating room scrub nurse and when people said you could eat off our floors, they were not exagerating. Something I didn't inherit.

Even though I was only seven, I could recognize handsome when I saw it. He was tan with very dark hair. He was wearing the whitest starched shirt I had ever seen, khaki pants and highly polished loafers.

When we were introduced, he bent down to talk with me. He talked to me on my level, as if what I had to say was important. He smelled so good. Nothing like the aftershave my father bought at the drugstore. It obviously paid to have a wife who was a buyer for Bergdorf's.

I can't remember ever seeing my Mother this happy. She smiled, she laughed, she hugged him. And he was every bit as happy to see her as she was to see him. Just one visit in all the years we lived there. We take the ease with which we travel for granted.

He brought gifts. We had never had a visitor that brought gifts and this made him all the more special and memorable. I even remember the gift.

It was a crepe paper ball. You lifted a tab and carefully unwrapped the ball. Each layer held a small toy; the size you'd find in a cracker jack box. Mine were charms. When you reached the center of my crepe ball you were rewarded with the bracelet. He attached the charms and fastened the bracelet on my wrist. My first gift of jewelry from a man. My only lasting memory of my Uncle.

Sunday, April 12, 2009

Easter At The Census


Today, we look to the census for a celebration of Easter, and we find it!

Three year old Easter Sunday is found in the 1920 census in Marion County, Florida, living on the farm of her aunt and uncle, Lucretia and Oliver Moore.

Were there any Peeps in the census? Yes! In the 1920 Census, we find Rose colored Peeps. Yes, Rose Peeps is living in Chautauqua, New York. This Peeps collection includes Lilly and Jasme.

1920 was certainly a good year for Easter in the census. Even Peter Rabbit is found living in St. Louis, while Peter Old Rabbit resides on the Crow Reservation in Big Horn, Montana.

Yes, the census was populated with every Bunny you can think of, their numbers growing with each passing year. As you'd expect.

And in 1870, Jesus Christ, an Italian immigrant, is a hotel keeper in Santa Clara County, California.

Ah, the census. It never fails to amuse and entertain. Happy Easter!



Poster courtesy of the Library of Congress.
Each census is noted.

Friday, April 10, 2009

Today I Understand - I Wish I had Then

Mother & Maven

My Mother came from a privileged family and married into what her Mother considered abject poverty. I don't know if I could have lived my Mother's life. Moving from the excitement of Carnegie Hall to wringing the necks of chickens in a coop in nowhere Missouri.

Both she and my father had a quiet dignity. What they believed, they lived. My Mother and Father did not believe in credit or debt. If you could not pay cash for something then you couldn't afford the thing you wanted.

That belief was tested so many times in my Mother's life. One of the most memorable was an occasion that touches me as a family historian. Our family needed a car. We were dirt poor and certainly not the type of debt risk any car dealer in our area would consider even if my parents would.

I remember my Mother and Father discussing their options late one night at the dining room table. We had little or nothing of value. My Great Grandmother Salter had died and left my Mother a mink coat, a bracelet, and a diamond cocktail ring.

A mink coat had so many applications for use on a farm in rural Missouri. They could certainly rid themselves of that, but for the fact I had cut a large chunk out of the coat to make doll clothes.

The simple bracelet was beautiful, but certainly not worth enough to buy a car. I remember my Mother wearing that bracelet every day of my life. My Father would not consider the bracelet.

So my Mother offered my Father the only other valuable possession she owned, the cocktail ring. The worth of the ring meant nothing to her, but the value of the connection to her Grandmother, to the life she once led, to the woman she once was meant everything. And still she offered the ring. It was their only option.

My Father took the ring to the local car dealer; a very wealthy man with a wife who belonged to the country club and was, by local standards, very social. A trade was made. A car for the ring. The man gave the ring to his wife as a gift. The ring had once belonged to the wife of the Superintendent of Carnegie Hall. The car dealer's wife immediately fell in love with my Great Grandmother's ring and its history.

My Mother never mentioned the ring again. I caught a glimpse of the ring several times as a teenager having become a friend of the car dealer's son. Even then I remember being sad seeing it. I never touched the ring. I never asked to try it on. I should have. I'm certain the car dealer's wife would have obliged.

"It was a fair trade," was the most either of my parents ever said about the ring when asked, until my family got word the car dealer's wife had died. Then my Mother contacted the dealer and asked if she could buy back her Grandmother's ring. He refused. The ring was buried with his wife as she had loved the ring. My Mother gracefully accepted the refusal, but it hurt her and she could not hide the fact.

I now realize that until that moment my Mother had held on to the hope that she would be reunited with her history, her heritage, her Grandmother's ring. Someday. Today, I understand what this sacrifice meant to my Mother.

A life that is worthy of those who came before and those who follow after.
A Life filled with small but courageous acts; filled with love and honor.
A simple life, an ordinary life, A Noble Life.

Smile For The Camera

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

12th Edition Smile For The Camera - A Reminder

12th EDITION

Smile For The Camera
10 April 2009


The word prompt for the 12th Edition of Smile For The Camera is A Noble Life. Show us a photograph of an ancestor, relative, or friend that is the embodiment of A Noble Life. A life that is worthy of those who came before and those who follow after. A Life filled with small but courageous acts; filled with love and honor. A simple life, an ordinary life, A Noble Life. Bring them to the carnival and share with us how you've honored them. Admission is free with every photograph!

Your submission may include as many or as few words as you feel are necessary to describe your treasured photograph. Those words may be in the form of an expressive comment, a quote, a journal entry, a poem (your own or a favorite), a scrapbook page, or a heartfelt article. The choice is yours!

Deadline for submission is midnight (PT)
10 April 2009

Posted - 15 April 2009

H
OW TO SUBMIT:

There are two options:

1. Send an email to the host, footnoteMaven. Include the title and permalink URL of the post you are submitting, your name, and the name of your blog. Put 'Smile For The Camera' clearly in the title of your email!

2. Use the handy submission form provided by Blog Carnival, or select the Bumper Sticker in the upper right hand corner.

See you at the Carnival!

Say Uncle!

70th Edition of The COG


The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is:


"Uncle, Uncle!"


This edition is all about our uncles.


- ¤ -

Have you got a favorite or interesting uncle?

- ¤ -

Tell us about him!

- ¤ -

Maybe you had a older cousin, neighbor, or friend
you called "uncle"... that works too!

- ¤ -

No uncles in your life? No problem.

- ¤ -

Write about any gentleman on your family tree
who was an uncle to somebody!

- ¤ - ¤ -

The Deadline For Submissions Is
April 15, 2009

(Get your tax return done early so you don't miss out!)


Attention All COG Participants

Please use a descriptive phrase in the title of any articles you plan to submit and/or write a brief description/introduction to your articles in the "comment" box of the blogcarnival submission form. This will give readers an idea of what you've written about and hopefully interest them in clicking on your link. Introductions for your articles will not be provided for you due to the volume of articles submitted. Thank you!

Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 70th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.



Sunday, April 5, 2009

Thank You ProGenealogists!

Heather Henderson of ProGenealogists has announced their picks for the 25 Most Popular Genealogy Blogs. To my great surprise, I found I'm on the list! Trying not to sound Sally Fieldish; I'm shocked, honored, tickled pink, geneasmacked! Yes, I'm all of that and more.

"All I can say is, ProGenealogists, Thank You!"

About the picks and its methodology Heather says, "Genealogy blogging is all the rage and on the rise. A Google search for genealogy blogs currently results in nearly half a million options, with over seven times that number for "family history" blogs. Nielsen Buzz Metrics BlogPulse shows a steady trend for genealogy and family history blogs with spikes correlating to celebrity family history activity in the news. Of the millions, 25 surface as the most popular all-around genealogy blogs, with a tie for 25th place according to rankings from Technorati."

Here are the Top 25 Genealogy Blogs as of 3 April 2009:


  1. About.com Genealogy (Kimberly Powell)
  2. Eastman Online Newsletter (Dick Eastman)
  3. Genea-Musings (Randy Seaver)
  4. Creative Gene (Jasia)
  5. Dear Myrtle (Pat Richely)
  6. AnceStories (Miriam Midkiff)
  7. Genealogue (Chris Dunham)
  8. footnoteMaven (Anonymous)
  9. Genetic Genealogist (Blaine Bettinger)
  10. Tracing The Tribe: Jewish Genealogy Blog (Schelly Talalay Dardashti)
  11. GenaBlogie (Craig Manson)
  12. Olive Tree Genealogy Blog (Lorine McGinnis Schulze)
  13. Steve’s Genealogy Blog (Stephen J. Danko)
  14. 24-7 Family History Circle (Juliana Smith)
  15. TransylvanianDutch (John Newmark)
  16. GenDisasters (Stu Beitler)
  17. Genealogy Insider @ FamilyTree (Diane Hadd)
  18. Think Genealogy (Mark Tucker)
  19. California Genealogical Society and Library Blog (California Genealogical Society)
  20. The Genealogy Guys (George G. Morgan and Drew Smith)
  21. CanadaGenealogy, or, 'Jane's Your Aunt' (Diane Rogers)
  22. Ancestry Insider (Anonymous)
  23. GenealogyBlog (Leland Meitzler)
  24. Ancestor Search Blog (Kathi)
  25. Tie Hugh Watkins Genealogue (Hugh Watkins) /its a tie!/
  26. Legacy News (Legacy Tree Software) /its a tie!/

Recommended reading can be found in many spots across the GeneaBlogs. Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings does a Best of The Genea-Blogs each week. His post is filled with must read articles. Randy's picks highlight the posts rather than the blogs, so there are always a variety of blogs to explore. I never miss this one.


Chris Dunham, the Genealogue, has created the Genealogy Blog Finder. Now, if you can't find something that interests you here, it doesn't exist. He also wrote, 10 Genealogy Blogs Worth Reading on Blogs.com. (Still trying to figure out which is the alter ego.)


You can always find a great GeneaBlog and a good read at the carnivals. You should also consider participating. It's a wonderful way to get to know other GeneaBloggers.
  1. Carnival of Genealogy
  2. Smile For The Camera
  3. Irish Heritage & Culture
  4. Central and Eastern European Genealogy
  5. Canadian Genealogy Carnival
  6. Graveyard Rabbit Carnival
  7. Cabinet of Curiosities
  8. History Carnival

If you have a moment, may I suggest Shades Of The Departed. The digital publication is mine and this is shameless self-promotion, but I'm proud of the work being done by all Shades' contributors.

On Shades you will find "Friday From The Collectors;" a weekly article featuring some of the best family historians, genealogists, photo historians, and collectors writing in a guest capacity. Great articles filled with useful information.

Shades hosts a monthly series of articles called, "Weekend With Shades" featuring columns by Craig Manson, Jasia, George Geder, Denise Olson, Denise Levenick, Rebecca Fenning, and Donna Pointkouski. These articles discuss law, restoration, technology, digi-scrapbooking, writing, archiving, and the humor of it all (plus a soon to be revealed addition) by some of the most knowledgeable GeneaBloggers.

There, that should be enough reading to distract any GeneaBlogger.

Again, thank you ProGenealogists, this is an unexpected honor. Do you think it will engender more respect from my husband, children, two dogs, and cat who generally ignore my attempts at blogging? Probably not.

Please note, Randy Seaver in bunny ears was requested by Sheri Fenley, The Educated Genealogist.

Friday, April 3, 2009

Follow The Yellow Brick Road!

Please note, there was an error in the "grab your code" footnote section. The period was inadvertently left out. I have inserted it and we are good to go.


For quite some time I've been working on a system of linked footnotes for use by GeneaBloggers in their blog posts. I have discussed this with many of you, tested them on many of you, and would like to thank you for your assistance.

The wonderful thing about blogs is that they are free, What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG) programming, easy to put online, accessible to the world genealogy community, and easy to read.

Adding footnotes thwarts many of the things that make blogs wonderful, but does add that layer of scholarly research, proof, and attribution we require. Please do not confuse adding linked footnotes with establishing a style for footnotes on geneablogs, which is also one of my projects. They are not the same thing.

I have found a method of linked footnotes that I am comfortable with adding to my blogs. You can see them in action on the Friday From The Collectors Article by Donna McClure on Shades. I find the link style blends into the written work and does not detract from the readability of the article. It is not, however, WYSIWYG.

In a real world written document you can flip back and forth between the note in the document and the footnote. This method of blog footnoting is similar, in that you can select the note in the document and be taken directly to the footnote. Once the footnote has been read you can select the footnote's number and be taken back to the exact spot where you were reading.

Not being WYSIWYG, any explanation must be understood by every level of blogger. I have read hundreds of sites that have attempted similar explanations and they have left me completely lost. Let's hope I can do a better job, but if I don't, please feel free to question me.

Let's begin.

Enter your post in your blog in HTML mode as plain text, no coding of any kind. Include the note and footnote numbers in their correct position in the article, as indicated in red below.

-- The Post --

Pirie MacDonald’s story started in Chicago where he was born Jan 27, 1867 just nine days after his Scottish mother arrived in the US. 1 Sources list his given name as Ian Pirie, but I came to question that since the 1870 census clearly shows him at the age of 3 listed as Jno for Jonathan or John. 2 Years later, in some directories, he is listed as J. P. in his ads. 3 Formal education ended for him at the age of 11. He was self-educated through “constant reading and studying, plus a passion for travel”.

1 “Guide to the Pirie MacDonald Portrait Photograph Collection”

2 1870 U.S. census, Cook County, Illinois population schedule, Ward 5 Chicago, p.249 (penned), p. 279 (stamped), dwelling 1703, family 1935. Jno. P. MacDonald: digital images, Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com); from National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 200.

3 Albany Directory 1890, (Albany, NY: Sampson, Murdock & Co. 1890), p. 194

Note: Omit the period behind the footnote number in the plain text article it will be added in the code. The red color is for grabbing your attention only. It has nothing to do with the notes themselves or the written article.

-- End Of Post --

In HTML Mode:

Replace the note numbers in the body of your article with the following code for each note:

Note 1:
‹a name="id1" href="#ftn.id1"›‹sup›1‹/sup›‹/a›

Note 2:
‹a name="id2" href="#ftn.id2"›‹sup›2‹/sup›‹/a›

Note 3:
‹a name="id3" href="#ftn.id3"›‹sup›3‹/sup›‹/a›

The note number is indicated in three spots in the code - here in red.

Repeat this process for each subsequent note!

The body of the article in HTML mode with note source would look like this:

Pirie MacDonald’s story started in Chicago where he was born Jan 27, 1867 just nine days after his Scottish mother arrived in the US. ‹a name="id1" href="#ftn.id1"›‹sup›1‹/sup›‹/a› Sources list his given name as Ian Pirie, but I came to question that since the 1870 census clearly shows him at the age of 3 listed as Jno for Jonathan or John. ‹a name="id2" href="#ftn.id2"›‹sup›2‹/sup›‹/a›Years later, in some directories, he is listed as J. P. in his ads. ‹a name="id3" href="#ftn.id3"›‹sup›3‹/sup›‹/a› Formal education ended for him at the age of 11. He was self-educated through “constant reading and studying, plus a passion for travel”.

Now, replace the actual footnote numbers in your article with the following code for each footnote:

Footnote 1:
‹a name="ftn.id1" href="#id1"›1‹/a›.

Footnote 2:
‹a name="ftn.id2" href="#id2"›2‹/a›.

Footnote 3:
‹a name="ftn.id3" href="#id3"›3‹/a›.

Repeat this process for each subsequent footnote!

The footnote portion of the article in HTML mode with
source would look like this:


‹a name="ftn.id1" href="#id1"›1‹/a›. “Guide to the Pirie MacDonald Portrait Photograph Collection”

‹a name="ftn.id2" href="#id2"›2‹/a›. 1870 U.S. census, Cook County, Illinois population schedule, Ward 5 Chicago, p.249 (penned), p. 279 (stamped), dwelling 1703, family 1935. Jno. P. MacDonald: digital images, Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com); from National Archives microfilm publication M593, roll 200.

‹a name="ftn.id3" href="#id3"›3‹/a›. Albany Directory 1890, (Albany, NY: Sampson, Murdock & Co. 1890), p. 194

That's it! Now I haven't explained what the code language means, and I'm not going to. I'm making this explanation WYSIWYG. If you want an in depth explanation, write me. I'm trying to keep this as simple as possible.

CAUTION! Do not select the code from this article and paste into your blog. It won't work. Grab your code here:

Note:


Footnote:



A suggestion or two:

You can take the code for a note and a footnote and place them in "Bloggers" template.

Note: ‹a name="id1" href="#ftn.id1"›‹sup›1‹/sup›‹/a›
Footnote: ‹a name="ftn.id1" href="#id1"›1‹/a›.

Then in HTML Mode highlight the code for note and copy. Highlight the note number in your article and paste the code. (Do the same for footnotes.) Remember to renumber each as you paste. I leave the number 1 in my code rather than replacing with an *. I remember where the number belongs if there is a 1 there. But that's just me, you should do what works best for you.

If there are no footnotes in your post, simply delete the code from the template.

As a Mac user, I have a little program called TypeIt4Me. I have put both those codes in the program and designated a keyboard shortcut. As I type my article I can hit that key for a note or footnote to appear. I add the correct number. I am not familiar with Windows, but I understand they have a similar program called AutoHotKey. If there is another Mac or Windows program, please share in the comments.

Are there variations on this theme? Yes, I have chosen to show you only one style. As I said, I'm trying to keep this as simple as possible. If you would like to see a variation on this style, write me. We'll all learn together.

Now, go try some blog footnotes!