Sunday, August 31, 2008

I Am Unique

Randy at Genea-Musings always seems to find the quirky, yet interesting, things that make up the online world. Recently he found How Many Of Me, a site that deals with names. You can search:

-- Your name: The first suggestion is right in the site name. How many people have your name?

-- Relatives: Search through your family tree. Search the names of your parents, siblings, aunts, uncles, grandparents, or anyone else related to you.

-- Nicknames: Does your name not have many (or any) results? If you're using a shortened form of your name (like Will, or Bill), you may get fewer results than you expect. Try using your full name (such as William).

-- Baby Names: Is little Junior on the way and you want to make sure he (or she) isn't stuck with the same name as 5 other kids when he gets to preschool? Try the names out here, see how many results you get.

-- Famous people: We've got an extensive list, try movie stars, sports heroes, political, scientific, or historic figures. We've got some of each in there.

So I put my name (my real name - not footnoteMaven) in the search engine and found out how truly unique I am:

-- There are fewer than 1,525 people in the U.S. with my first name.
-- There are 189,128 people in the U.S. with my last name.
-- Statistically the 150th most popular last name.

There are one or fewer people with my exact name.

HowManyOfMe.com
LogoThere are
1
or fewer people with my name in the U.S.A.

An interesting diversion as I am migrating from one computer to another this week, adding new software and equipment.

My real name?
The clues are everywhere!


TheEnd

Monday, August 25, 2008

Silver Threads And Golden Needles


ONE MORE MEDAL PLEASE!


To Miriam Robbins Midkiff, Kathryn Doyle, and Thomas MacEntee, the members of the Genea-Games Organizing Committee, for your tireless efforts on behalf of the Genea-Blogging Community in the organization of the 2008 Games Of The Genea-Bloggers, this medal from its grateful participants and fans.




Your silver threads and golden needles produced a magnificent show of community!

Friday, August 22, 2008

The Great Missouri River Flood of 1844


HUGE CROWDS OF PEOPLE GATHERED ON THE BANKS OF THE GREAT Missouri River. The sky was clear and blue with not a single cloud. The strange sights presented here this June would never be forgotten.

A huge stack of straw had been swept away down the river carrying several hogs. As the odd watercraft passed the crowd some of the porkers could be plainly seen rooting around while the others lay nearby lazily sleeping, unconcerned with the peril that had befallen them. [24] They were players on the stage of the Great Missouri River Flood of 1844. They were the daily entertainment for the crowds gathered on the bluffs.

Just at the time the “June Rise” began and the snow packs were melting in the mountains, a heavy rain commenced to fall all over Kansas and Western Missouri. “Every evening out of a clear sky just as the sun went down there arose a dark, ominous looking cloud in the northwest. Flashes of lightning and the heaviest thunder followed, and about ten o’clock the rain would begin to fall in torrents.”[25] The rain continued its torrential fall for thirty days and then came thundering down into the Missouri River just in time to meet the spring thaw. In a few short days the bottomlands across the river as far back as the bluffs were overflowed. The Missouri River was more than thirty feet above flood stage. [26]

Houses floated down the river almost completely intact. Chickens rode the roofs of stables crowing loudly about their plight. [27] Hundreds of cattle, hogs, horses and mules were lost by farmers who were unable to remove their stock or who had foolishly waited until the last moment. The loss to the farmers of Missouri and Illinois was substantial.

On 22 June 1844, one such farmer, William Austin of Sugar Tree Bottom, one of the hardest hit areas in Carroll County, wrote a letter to his wife detailing the problems he had encountered and the fate of his neighbors:

I am in Carrollton to see what has become of my negroes that I moved out last Sunday to keep them from being drowned by the flood…my neighbors both above and below me are missed their crops, fences and stock are all washed away, out of 75 or 80 farms in Sugar Tree Bottom not more than five or six have escaped. My farm is the highest in the bottom which is about six feet above the high water mark at present. I sent out my negroes & stock to the hills and remained at home alone…Kiss the children for me and accept for yourself the love of your affectionate Husband.

W. W. Austin

P.S. I came from my farm to the foot of the Bluff at Carrollton in a skiff in company with Wm. Turner.” [28]


It is against the backdrop of the flood that John and Sarah Campbell celebrated their first anniversary and the birth of their first child, a daughter, Mary William. [29] Mary had been born a few months before the flood, but when the old timers of Carrollton discussed the birth of “Mollie” Campbell, the Flood of 1844 would always be mentioned in the same breath. She would forever be known as the child of the flood. [30]

John and Sarah were witnesses to the destruction of 1844. The fate of the land, stock, and crops would be of interest to every man engaged in farming and John was a tobacco farmer, a member of the community of farmers that made up Carroll County. Sarah was the wife of a farmer and the daughter of the prominent Graham farming family; she would have wanted to know the fate of her neighbors as well. [31]

The perfect vantage point for the daily parade down the Missouri River in 1844 would have been Mary Campbell’s home at Miles Point, a steamboat landing on the Missouri. [32] The Campbell family were very close; and as newlyweds John and Sarah would have visited John’s mother often, particularly since the death of his father. [32] The visits were probably more frequent this June because of the sights and sounds that were the topic of conversation all over the county.

Perhaps because of what John saw, or perhaps because the seventeen year old Sarah, a new wife and mother, wanted the security of living in town, John began to explore the possibility of becoming a merchant.

John’s brother William had become a successful merchant in Jessamine County, Kentucky, and John wanted that same success. [34] He was interested in buying or becoming a partner in the store in Mandeville owned by Harrison Graham and Sarah’s brother Jack Reed Graham. Jack Reed was known to drink a quart of whiskey a day and still be able to sell more goods than anyone in the store.

John did not go into business with Harrison and Jack Graham. Whether it was the fact that Harrison and Jack didn’t want to sell, didn’t want a partner or because of Jack’s drinking, whatever the reason, John did not realize his dream of becoming a merchant until 1850. [35]

Sources:

[24] Missouri Historical Company, History of Carroll County, Missouri: Carefully
Written and Compiled from the Most Authentic Official and Private Sources, Including a History of its Townships, Cities, Towns and Villages, Together with a Condensed History of Missouri; the Constitution of the United States, and State of Missouri; a Military Record of its Volunteers in either Army of the Great Civil War; General and Local Statistics; Miscellany; Reminiscences, Grave, Tragic and Humorous; Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Citizens Identified with the Interests of the Country. (St. Louis: Missouri Historical Company, 1881.), 265.

[25] Pierre Menard Chouteau, High Water: Playful Pranks of the Missouri. Kansas City Times, April 1, 1872, “The Floods of 1827 and 1844 – Will There be a Flood this Spring – Some Recollections of a Native of the Soil”. The Western Historical Manuscript Collection in Kansas City, University of Missouri. [Online at http://www.umkc.edu/WHMCKC/], accessed January 2005.

[26] Ibid.

[27] Missouri Historical Company, History of Carroll County, Missouri, 265.

[28] Letter of W. W. Austin to his wife, 22 June 1844; held by Western Historical Manuscript Collection, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri.

[29] Carroll County Genealogical Association, Oak Hill Cemetery, (Carrollton, Missouri: HJH Quick Printing), 91; Family data, Transcription of John Campbell Family Bible, 25 December 1942. Frank Tull, Campbell – Graham Family Genealogy Papers, Western Historical Manuscript Collection, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri.

[30] Frank Tull, Campbell – Graham Family, 55.

[31] Ibid., 65.

[32] Marilyn Neathery McCluen, Frederick (Old Fed) Grider and His Twenty-Two Children (Rockwood, Tennessee: Self-Published), 526.

[33] Rogers Campbell estate (1840), Probate Estate Files, Reel C35303, Vol. 1830-1848, Carroll County, Missouri. Missouri State Archives, Jefferson City.

[34] Note William Campbell’s worth $20,000. William Campbell household, 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Jessamine County, Nicholasville Post Office, Kentucky, population schedule, Page Unreadable, Line 37 – 40, dwelling 997; family 997; PDF file, Online: ProQuest Company, 2005, subscription database, National Archives Micropublication Series M653, Roll, 378, Page 143. [Online at www.heritagequestonline.com/], accessed November 2004.

[35] Frank Tull, Campbell – Graham Family, 36.



TheEnd

Getting To Know Me - Getting To Know All About The footnoteMaven's Blog

Bloggers need to burn with a restless intensity that makes people want to come back and see what they've got to say. Times UK Online.

My real name is not footnoteMaven. I'm sure all of you have figured that out by now. If you squint your eyes just right I look exactly like the picture of the footnoteMaven above.

The name footnoteMaven came from a classmate in a Nearby History Workshop at the Museum of History and Industry in Seattle long before I was a Genea-Blogger. My fellow writers would hand out their work to be critiqued and I would continually say, "I would have believed you if you had just cited your source." One of my writer friends started calling me the footnoteMaven and it stuck. I am the footnoteMaven in the real world as well as the blogosphere.

I love what Thomas MacEntee said about my name in The Week In Facebook - 8/22/2008: (yes, it is one word - like Madonna, Cher and other estimable divas). Thanks Thomas! Me a dive, hardly, but it looks good in print.


I didn't get into blogging to be another Dick Eastman or the lovely Dear Myrtle. They have the market cornered and do an admirable job. I leave the "breaking news" to them. I wanted to blog for the pure enjoyment of creating with a group of people who didn't roll their eyes and yawn every time I started talking about my latest genealogy project. I wanted to learn from a group of people who had continually demonstrated they were willing to share their expertise. I wanted to benefit from their comments on my work.

My first post was for the Carnival of Genealogy. I watched the other Genea-Bloggers write for the Carnival and I wanted to try to tell my family story. I created the footnoteMaven blog and then posted Shelter From the Storm, Stories of the Home and Hearth. I didn't receive a single comment, but Jasia of Creative Gene was very kind in her introduction of my article. She has unselfishly encouraged me ever since.

I use my blog to try out the many methods of writing that will become my family history and if you're a reader of this blog you know I also love to tinker with graphics, old photographs, and the ways to use them in our written family histories and as gifts. I create a poster for every COG and just about any other request for graphics I receive.

When I started the footnoteMaven blog I knew I needed something that would help me stand out among the many fine genealogy blogs being written at the time, so I constructed a Quilt of Genea-Bloggers. A visual representation of my blog roll. It did help to launch me. Today there are so many more genea-blogs being written it is difficult for a new blog to establish its place in the mix. Don't give up, it takes a while to establish yourself.

My favorite post will always be Finding That Two Hundredth Edwardian Woman in a White Dress. It was inspired by a terrific blogger, Janice Brown of Cow Hampshire and I will be eternally grateful to her for her inspiration and good humor. That post along with Dating Old Photographs :: Becky's Mystery Photograph #9 were the impetus for creating my companion blog Shades of The Departed. I love photographs and their mysteries. Now I write about them in a far more structured digital magazine.

There are other posts that I have enjoyed writing.

One such post was My Ancestors Didn't Raise No Fools - April Or Otherwise - Or Did They? about my father and his sense of humor. Another was, I Once Was The Great Pumpkin a Halloween post and The Tale Is Here To Tell a story of family myths.

I have done some actual genealogy articles, one such being What's In A Name about family names, hereditary names and their origins. Get Organized :: Store Information Directly In Your Photographs a post that landed fM a spot on Dear Myrtle's podcast, and Little Red Genetic Hood, a genetics spoof inspired by Terry Thornton of Hill Country.

I have contributed a new word to the lexicon of the blogging world; Blodging, courtesy of my long suffering husband. Blogging takes a real commitment, as does consistency in the work product. It is not easy to keep a blog going for years. The failure rate for new blogs is probably very close to that of new restaurants, but I would do it all over again tomorrow and change nothing. I love blogging or blodging as the case may be!

I have made so many wonderful friends in all parts of the world. They have given me encouragement, support and assistance, and I thank them and hope I have done the same for them.

You will note I have listed my email at the bottom of my blog. Not sure you want to enter the world of commenting yet? You can always send an email to me. I love getting comments and email (we all do), the good, the bad, and the "just hello." I do my best to respond to them all. Genea-bloggers are the most inclusive group of people I know.


TheEnd

The Games Of The 2008 Genea-Bloggers Group - Tally


THE GAMES OF THE 2008 GENEA-BLOGGERS GROUP


Guest Hosting "Smile For The Camera Submissions" can be found here.

Becky Wiseman of kinexxions will host the October "Smile For The Camera."

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources!

I will participate in the following:

I will create proper citations of sources for 50 events using Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace by Elizabeth Shown Mills.

Tough - I already have my events cited. The best I could do was to check those citations for correctness.

2. Back Up Your Data!

I will participate in the following:

A. Prepare a comprehensive backup plan for my digital research files and a security plan for my hard copies and photos.

Digital research files and photographs to external hard-drive. DVDs to be made of each category. Contacted three family members who will accept DVD files to be stored on their premises, made aware of location of hard copies. Also added to this a disaster awareness plan.

B. Secure my hard copies and photos in waterproof containers.

All photos in archival sleeves in waterproof containers. Research hard copies are not completed. Family history writing moving to online - not completed.

C. Backup my data using a flash drive, an external drive, CDs, DVDs, or an online resource.

Back-up to an external hard drive all files on three computers. Two computers done, one not complete. Need to purchase a larger external hard drive for photographic files only, don't like them mixed with documents even if in folders. DVDs could not be completed in this time frame, but the work has been commenced. Probably be able to continue this in the next games.

3. Organize Your Research!

I will participate in the following:

A. Organize at least 20 hard files or ancestral items (books, fabrics, inherited items) into file folders, boxes, envelopes, containers, etc.; archival-quality where appropriate.

10 books, pamphlets, relating to Carnegie Hall into archival-quality envelopes. Two sterling silver calling cards to Metal Edge Archival Storage box. Two silver napkin rings and 1 fan in acid free tissue. 15 items completed.

B. Organize at least 20 digital files into folders, label, add metadata, add descriptions, add tags, etc.

This was already complete. Reviewed files for correctness.

C. Organize at least 20 photos into photo albums, scrapbooks, collages, protective holders, boxes, etc.

60 photographs organized into protective holders in waterproof containers. All other photographs were already organized, then secured in waterproof containers.

D. Organize at least 20 digital photos into folders, label, add metadata, add descriptions, add tags, etc.

My digital photo files for my Campbell family (70) organized into folders. Created an information sheet to be placed in a three ring binder for easy visual access with all information necessary to date photographs. Devised a numbering system with meta tags.

E. Create at least 20 data entries in my database, or scan 20 photos, or scan 20 documents.

Not attempted.

F. Create a master list of your files and notify your family members of where it is stored.

See 2A above. Master list 1/3 of the way completed.

4. Write, Write, Write!

I will participate in the following:

A. Write a summary of what my blog is about and post it on my blog.

Wrote -
Getting To Know Me Getting To Know All About The footnoteMaven's Blog.

B. Participate in a genealogy or family history related blog carnival.

Participated in Smile For The Camera and the 54th Edition of the COG.


C. Prepare several posts in draft mode and pre-publish.

Eight posts in draft mode. Four to pre-publish, four published.


D. Write a brief biographical sketch on one of your ancestors.

The Great Missouri River Flood of 1844

E. Volunteer "Smile For The Camera - October" for a guest host:

Becky Wiseman of
kinexxions will host October 2008 Smile For The Camera.

5. Reach Out & Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness!

I will participate in the following:

A. Comment on a new (to you) genea-blog.

Commented on the new to me and recommended by Kathryn Doyle - Forgotten Faces Blog.


B. Join another genea-blogger’s blog network on Facebook Blog Networks.

Joined five networks during the period of time of the games.


C. Invite other genealogists to join Facebook.

Invited two bloggers and one non-blogger genealogist to join Facebook.


D. Assist another researcher with a research request or lookup.

Scanning 26 cabinet card photographs for another researcher.


Contacted a library for a researcher in an attempt to help her date her family photographs. Identified the names of her great grandparents who had been unknown to her.

Provided the Carnegie Library in Grafton, North Dakota, with a digital photograph of one of its prominent citizens.

E. Participate in an indexing project.

Have received the materials to transcribe the Indian Country Census for the State of Washington. Participating, but have not begun the transcription itself. Not really an indexing project, rather a transcription.


F. Join a genealogical, historical, heritage or lineage society.

Renewed my Museum of History and Industry membership.


And so we close this chapter on
The Games Of The 2008 Genea-Bloggers Group

I'm tired and I didn't get nearly enough accomplished.
I better start training for the next Games!





TheEnd

Wednesday, August 20, 2008

footnoteMaven and the Wizard of Oz

You blog, you wonder if anyone reads, then along comes a month like August. First, the September 2008 issue of Internet Genealogy Magazine spotlighted my companion blog, Shades Of The Departed, in a Net Notes article written by Donna Pointkouski of What's Past Is Prologue.

Then Alltop.com., from my hero Guy Kawasaki, listed both footnoteMaven and Shades as the Best of the Best on their digital magazine rack in the Genealogy Category.

Now, World Vital Records' Family History Bulletin has named footnoteMaven as one of the Top Genealogy Blogs. They have put me in exceptionally good company. Listed along with the Maven are Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter, DearMYRTLE, 24/7 Family History Circle, Genealogy Insider, Genea-Musings, Ancestry Insider, Family Matters, and The Genealogue.

Thank you World Vital Records for recognizing me and for putting me in such auspicious company. I really liked the scholarly writing comment.

Check back often at World Vital Records' Family History Bulletin as they update the genealogy community on the latest and greatest genealogy blogs and websites.

So where does the Wizard of Oz come into this? Well, I honestly feel like the all-seeing, all-knowing Oz just before someone pulls the drape and finds out that behind-the-curtain is a computer, an internet connection, an office filled with stuff, and the Maven still wearing her slippers (and they're not Ruby) at ten in the morning. Not quite the picture of the "Top."




Source:

Illustration courtesy of the NYPL Digital Gallery. Pen and ink drawings for The Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum.(created ca. 1901)


TheEnd

Monday, August 18, 2008

Show & Tell

55TH EDITION OF THE COG


The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is:
SHOW AND TELL

- ¤ -

Remember that fun little exercise you used to
do
in your grade school days?

Here’s your chance to do it again!

- ¤ -

Show us and tell us about an heirloom, a special photo,
a valuable document, or a significant person that is a
very special part of your family history.

- ¤ -

Don’t be shy now, show us what you’ve got!

- ¤ -

This is all about bragging rights so don’t hesitate to make the rest
of us green with envy! This is your chance to brag, brag, brag,
without seeming like a braggart (you can’t be a braggart when
you’re merely following directions ;-) … so show and tell!

- ¤ -

The Deadline For Submissions Is September 1, 2008



Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 55th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.





TheEnd

Bob Franks Latest Blurbarian

Recently I updated my original article on using Blurb for writing your family history with Are You Blurbing?

Bob Franks of Itawamba Historical Review wrote that he was also trying Blurb and had this to offer:

I downloaded the software and played around with it. One thing I like about the software is you can print a proof copy of the book you are working on. I simply printed to a PDF file. The software offers some nice templates also. I've already created a 40-page 8x10 landscape sized book and ordered it Monday. I ordered just two copies to see how they turn out and if I am pleased will order more.

Today Bob received his Blurb published book carefully wrapped in bubble-wrap and packed in a sturdy box. The book was ordered August 3 and shipped August 12, it arrived UPS Ground this afternoon.

Bob is extremely pleased. He writes that the cover is a heavy stock glossy paper with semi-gloss pages on the inside. Of the quality Bob says:

It simply looks like a professionally produced book. They did an extremely good job. My first book was a 40-page book of photographs, softbound 8x10 landscape sized book. I will probably order a hardbound copy of the book now as they have the book already uploaded.


Here is a photo of the cover and another of Bob's beautiful photographs inside the book.

The Cover

Some of Bob Franks Photographs
In A Place Called Home
Itawamba County, Mississippi

Thank you so much Bob for taking the time to update all those interested in publishing their family histories with Blub. This cinches it for me. I will soon be a Blurbarian.

TheEnd

Friday, August 15, 2008

Home To The Ear

We have the same biological parents. We were both raised by those parents. We shared the same room in the same house for seventeen years. So how is it that my sister sounds as if she's been drinking out of a Dixie cup all her life and I have no accent?

I lay this anomaly directly at the good intentions of our Mother. Mother was a New Yawker, with a mirra (mirror), arange (orange), Linder (Linda) sort of accent. She always believed a southern accent somehow made you sound less intelligent. Her daughter, the intelligent one - as opposed to the beautiful one, would have no southern accent.

I, on the other hand, loved the genteel old money Mint Julep southern accent. The drama queen found it very Tennessee Williams. Some of my friends had that accent and they seemed so elegant, so lady-like, so filled with southern charm.

But Mother had other plans. Years of work, and a speech teacher who shared my Mother's goal, left me with no recognizable accent. It was a difficult task getting a good southern girl to give up her accent. A difficult task and a lot of time. So much time that my sister and brothers went unchecked into the dark abyss of the dreaded southern accent.

It's best they did, because they never needed an interpreter at family gatherings. They spoke the "git, teched, stove up, leave me be" language of the clan. I always roamed the outskirts asking, "What did they say?" Until I was much older most of the family thought I was deaf. Once they found I wasn't they determined the problem was not my ears but my nose; it was a little too high in the air.

I never found my place with the New Yawkers either. One summer vacation to visit put me in my place with them. I was continually forced to repeat mirror (mirra), orange (arange), Linda (Linder) and it was never to their satisfaction. They laughed and taunted me. I was their summer amusement. They sent me home self-conscious of every word I spoke. I didn't belong on either the Northern or Southern side of that famous line.

As an adult I found a home for my accent among the out of work actors of Southern California. No accent to be heard until the director yells "Action." Then they can sound like anyone they please. Yes, I have more in common with them then my own family.

I miss the sound of the South. Hearing it in a crowd always causes me to turn and search. Even now the accent comes to me in my dreams, not to mention five minutes talking with my sister has us sharing the same Dixie Cup. The South, home to the ear, how I miss it.


TheEnd

Thursday, August 14, 2008

Shopping - Hazardous To Your Health

This article will prove conclusively that at one time
shopping was hazardous to your health!

When I was young my family lived way out in the country. As children we came to town to go to school, but the town was small and had no stores. To shop, we had to travel one town over and the store choices there were very limited.

Just about now, at the start of every school year, we went into town to buy a new pair of shoes. The shoe store was a Buster Brown dealer in the basement of the building that housed the town's only drug store. Yes, in the old days they were called drug stores rather than pharmacies.

If we behaved ourselves in the shoe store my parents would treat us to a cherry coke and hamburger at the drug store's soda fountain. I loved the drug store. They sold jewelry, gold compacts, and perfume. I still remember the wonderful smells in the back of the store, in the cosmetics department, just past the greasy hamburgers at the soda fountain. Yes, I even miss the greasy hamburgers.

As you will see, behaving in the shoe store was extremely difficult for any child. The store prided itself on being a very modern shoe store catering to children. There was very little selection, so deciding on a pair of shoes didn't command a great deal of time, but making sure the shoes fit properly did. This is where the behavior problem surfaces. The store had what could be called an attractive nuisance, known today as a health hazard.

A modern device called a Shoe-fitting Fluoroscope was installed in the store to insure that every child's shoes fit properly. All you had to do was lift your children onto the machine wearing their new shoes, stick their feet inside the opening and turn on the x-ray. Ill fitting shoes was obviously a higher health risk than prolonged exposure to x-rays.


There were three ports for viewing the x-ray. One for the child, one for the mother, and one for the sales person. You could see the bones in your feet and the outline of your shoes in a very eerie green color. You could even watch your toes wiggle.

While mother was busy with the twins my sister and I would take turns x-raying our feet. Then one of us would sit on the machine and stick our hands in the opening so the other could watch our fingers move. You could even slide your little handbag in the opening, climb up, and x-ray its contents. What a cool machine.

What a cool machine? It was soon discovered that the hazards from radiation weren’t worth the proper fit of children's shoes:

The primary component of a shoe-fitting x-ray unit was the fluoroscope which consisted essentially of an x-ray tube mounted near the floor and wholly or partially enclosed in a shielded box and a fluorescent screen. The x-rays penetrated the shoes and feet and then struck the fluorescent light. This resulted in an image of the feet within the shoes. The fluorescent image was reflected to three viewing ports at the top of the cabinet, where the customer, the salesperson, and a third person (your mother?) could view the image at the same time.

The radiation hazards associated with shoe fitting x-ray units were recognized as early as 1950. The machines were often out of adjustment and were constructed so radiation leaked into the surrounding area.


Fortunately we only purchased shoes once or twice a year. Fortunately the danger of x-rays to the human body became publicized and the machines were removed.

It appears the x-rays had no effect on me or my sister. Neither of us glows in the dark. Probably due to the ingestion of greasy hamburgers and cherry cokes immediately after exposure.

Sources:
The image of the shoe-fitting fluoroscope courtesy of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities Museum.

Online sources for shoe-fitting fluoroscopy:

-- Baring the Sole: The Rise and Fall of the Shoe-Fitting Fluoroscope 2000 by Jacalyn Duffin and Charles Hayter, Isis 2000;91(2):260-282.
-- Online exhibit on shoe-fitting fluoroscopy at the ORAU Museum, introduction and illustrations.
-- When the solution is the problem: a brief history of the shoe fluoroscope. Nedd CA 2nd. AJR 1992;158:1270.

TheEnd

Monday, August 11, 2008

All The Cool Kids (And Me)

Alltop, all the cool kids (and me)


Recently, Guy Kawasaki, former Apple Evangelist, author, venture capitalist, Truemors creator, and Top 100 Technorati blogger, launched Alltop.com. What is Alltop.com? Here's how they describe themselves:

We help you explore your passions by collecting stories about “all the topics” on the web. We’ve grouped these collections — “aggregations” — into individual Alltop sites based on topics such as environment, photography, science, Muslim, celebrity gossip, military, fashion, gaming, sports, politics, automobiles, and Macintosh. At each Alltop site, we display the headlines of the latest stories from dozens of sites and blogs.

You can think of an Alltop site as a “digital magazine rack” of the Internet. To be clear, Alltop sites are starting points—they are not destinations per se. The bottom line is that we are trying to enhance your online reading by both displaying stories from the sites that you’re already visiting and helping you discover sites that you didn’t know existed. In other words, our goal is the “cessation of Internet stagnation” by providing “aggregation without aggravation.”

One of my favorite non-genealogy blogs was listed at Alltop.com and she was so honored and excited that I wandered over for a look. I'm a Mac user, so I knew all about Guy Kawasaki. I own his books for heaven's sake. The line-up was very impressive! But at that time they were missing a genealogy category.

Things are moving over at Alltop. They now include a category for genealogy. I am pleased and extremely honored to announce that footnoteMaven and Shades Of The Departed are listed in the Alltop.com digital genealogy magazine rack. Thank you Alltop.com, did I mention I'm so excited! Genealogy is now playing with the cool kids.

Go, take a look at the sites Alltop.com has included in their digital genealogy magazine rack. See anyone you know?




TheEnd

Sunday, August 10, 2008

Yes, It's Who You Think It Is!


And no, we're not related!

Every photograph I own is a favorite for one reason or another. This photograph is my favorite because my Grandfather, Edward J. Greene, was the photographer.

When I get my children to sit still long enough to go over the things they would like to have when I'm gone they agree on most everything, except this photograph. All three of them want this one, the original.

That's Clark Gable between takes on the set of the movie San Francisco (1936). It's just after the earthquake scene where Blackie Norton (Clark Gable) is searching San Francisco for Mary Blake (Jeanette MacDonald) and believes she is dead. He and Father Tim (Spencer Tracy) find Mary at a Salvation Army Camp where she is comforting the mother of a dead child, in song of course.

I've heard the stories of my Grandfather's friendship with both Gable and Myrna Loy (also pictured on the vehicle above). It was said that Gable and my Grandfather exchanged Christmas presents every year. Each got the other the same bottle of whiskey (an inside joke?).

It is also said that they spent a lot of time together at Abercrombie and Fitch (A&F). In those days the store didn't market youthful apparel as it does today. It was a "real" man's store. A store for the rugged outdoors man.

The family story goes that Gable and my grandfather spent a lot of time at the bar in A&F. I have found no historical reference to a bar in the store, but it had everything else.

"Where the Blazed Trail Crosses The Boulevard," read the sign outside the Madison Avenue store. The basement housed an armored shooting range while on the mezzanine (main floor), there was paraphernalia for skiing, archery, skin-diving, and lawn games.

The second through fifth floors were reserved for clothing that was suitable for different climates or terrains. A&F outfitted Charles Lindbergh for his historic flight across the Atlantic.

On the sixth floor, there was a picture gallery, a bookstore (focused on sporting themes), a watch repair facility and a golf school (fully equipped with a resident professional).

The seventh floor was recognized as the finest gun department in the world. It included a gun room, stuffed game heads, and hundreds of shot guns and rifles. It's said that Ernest Hemingway bought the gun he used to committed suicide in this department.

The eighth floor was dedicated to fishing, camping, and boating. The fly-and bait-casting instructor had a desk on this floor and gave lessons at the pool, located on the roof. The fishing section of the store alone was stocked with over 48,000 flies and more than 18,000 fishing lures.

On the roof, Fitch had ordered the construction of a log cabin; he often used it as a townhouse. Beside it, there was a casting pool where customers tested the company's collection of rods and flies.

How close were my Grandfather and Gable? I don't really know. Grandfather worked for MGM, and was associated with the vehicle above. That I can substantiate. I have photographs of Gable and Myrna Loy. This one taken by my Grandfather. That I can substantiate. Clark Gable hung out in A&F. That I can substantiate. Were they drinking buddies? Family lore I can't substantiate, but they met on at least one occasion, to take this photograph. Yes, I'll chase the leads and perhaps one day have an answer. Until then, it's a pretty good family story and Gable has a great Smile For The Camera.

Sources:

Wikipedia - Abercrombie and Fitch History. Accessed on 08/08/2008.

History. Abercrombie & Fitch Co. Accessed on 08/08/2008.

Illustration:

A&F Catalog Cover. ca. 1909. Edward Brewer. Wikipedia.
Accessed on 08/08/2008.

Photograph:

Clark Gable by Edward Jesse Greene. Print. ca. 1935/36. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2008.



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Saturday, August 9, 2008

Smile For The Camera! - A Reminder


4th EDITION

Smile For The Camera ~ A Carnival of Images


The 4th Edition of Smile For The Camera takes its word prompt from the Ace of Hearts. What photograph do you consider "My Favorite Photograph," the one that has won your heart.

Choose a photograph of an ancestor, relative, yourself, or an orphan photograph that is your favorite family photo or that photograph you've collected and wouldn't give up for a King's ransom.

Is it the only photograph of an ancestor, is it funny, poignant, or very rare? My favorite photograph is the first one I ever collected. What's yours? Share it with us! Then get back out in the summer sun.

Your submission may include as many or as few words as you feel are necessary to describe your treasured photograph. Those words may be in the form of an expressive comment, a quote, a journal entry, a poem (your own or a favorite), a scrapbook page, or a heartfelt article. The choice is yours!

Deadline for submission is midnight 10 August, 2008.

HOW TO SUBMIT:

There are two options:

1. Send an email to the host, footnoteMaven. Include the title and permalink URL of the post you are submitting, and the name of your blog. Put 'Smile For The Camera' clearly in the title of your email!

2. Use the handy submission form provided by Blog Carnival, or select the Bumper Sticker in the upper right hand corner.

See you at the Carnival!

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Past Editions Of Smile For The Camera:

1st Edition ~ Mother Love

2nd Edition ~ Belles & Beaus

3rd Edition ~ Celebrate Home


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Friday, August 8, 2008

My Game Plan - The Games Of The 2008 Genea-Bloggers Group


THE GAMES OF THE 2008 GENEA-BLOGGERS GROUP


Guest Hosting "Smile For The Camera Submissions" can be found here.

1. Go Back and Cite Your Sources!

I will participate in the following:

I will create proper citations of sources for 50 events using Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace by Elizabeth Shown Mills.

I will create proper citations of sources for blog posts missing citations using Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace by Elizabeth Shown Mills.

2. Back Up Your Data!

I will participate in the following:

A. Prepare a comprehensive backup plan for my digital research files and a security plan for my hard copies and photos

B. Secure my hard copies and photos in waterproof containers

C. Backup my data using a flash drive, an external drive, CDs, DVDs, or an online resource

3. Organize Your Research!

I will participate in the following:

A. Organize at least 20 hard files or ancestral items (books, fabrics, inherited items) into file folders, boxes, envelopes, containers, etc.; archival-quality where appropriate.

B. Organize at least 20 digital files into folders, label, add metadata, add descriptions, add tags, etc.

C. Organize at least 20 photos into photo albums, scrapbooks, collages, protective holders, boxes, etc.

D. Organize at least 20 digital photos into folders, label, add metadata, add descriptions, add tags, etc.

E. Create at least 20 data entries in my database, or scan 20 photos, or scan 20 documents.

F. Create a master list of your files and notify your family members of where it is stored

4. Write, Write, Write!

I will participate in the following:

A. Write a summary of what my blog is about and post it on my blog.

B. Participate in a genealogy or family history related blog carnival.

C. Prepare several posts in draft mode and pre-publish.

D. Write a brief biographical sketch on one of your ancestors.

E. Volunteer "Smile For The Camera - October" for a guest host:

5. Reach Out & Perform Genealogical Acts of Kindness!

I will participate in the following:

A. Comment on a new (to you) genea-blog.

B. Join another genea-blogger’s blog network on Facebook Blog Networks.

C. Invite other genealogists to join Facebook.

D. Assist another researcher with a research request or lookup.

E. Participate in an indexing project.

F. Join a genealogical, historical, heritage or lineage society.

LET THE GAMES BEGIN!


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Thursday, August 7, 2008

Are You Blurbing?

Recently I wrote an article about using Blurb for writing your family history. I have been working with the software and really like the variety found in the templates. Several people commented about their experiences using Blurb.

Rebecca Fenning of A Sense Of Face wrote:

I've put together a couple of books using Blurb and they do a really great job. I think you get more flexibility as far as using both text and images, as opposed to iPhoto - which is still great, provided you're using only pictures with captions and don't go over their page limit (which I learned the hard way! It gets very expensive very fast!)


Bob Franks of Itawamba Historical Review is also trying Blurb and had this to offer:

I downloaded the software and played around with it. One thing I like about the software is you can print a proof copy of the book you are working on. I simply printed to a PDF file. The software offers some nice templates also. I've already created a 40-page 8x10 landscape sized book and ordered it Monday. I ordered just two copies to see how they turn out and if I am pleased will order more.


Thank you Rebecca and Bob for the added Blurb information. Bob, please let us know how your book turns out and if you have any photos we'd be pleased to feature them in an update.

I have also found a wealth of information at Blurberati, The Blurb Blog. Two articles, Tip - adding text over photos and Tip — changing photo sizes in BookSmart were very helpful.

Blurb has also hosted webinars regarding their publishing. I missed the August 6th webinar, but hope to find one listed on Blurberati in the near future.

If you have any further information about the use of Blurb with family histories, please comment.

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The Birthday Club Makes A Connection

Those who read the footnoteMaven and Shades Of The Departed know there is one post that occupies a very special place in my heart. That post would be, Finding That Two Hundredth Edwardian Woman In A White Dress. It is the first post where I researched a photograph from my collection for information concerning those who were pictured, affectionately called The Birthday Club Method.

While wandering the web this week the Granddaughter of Bessie Suemper, one of the women in the photograph contacted me. Here again is Bessie's story and what has transpired.


The Birthday Club - Lamoure, N.D. - 1911

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Mrs. Dietrich Suemper is Bessie Suemper. According to the 1910 census she would be 28 years old in the photograph. Dietrich and Bessie have a daughter Evelyn who is 4 years old and is also pictured in the photograph. They were married between 7 June 1900 (1900 census in which Dietrich is unmarried) and 2 September 1911 (date of the photograph). Using Evelyn's age they were probably married in 1906 or 1907. Dietrich is a butcher employed in Lamoure's local meat market.

In the 1900 census Dietrich was a boarder in the hotel run by Hannah Larson who is also pictured in the photograph. Bessie is not married in the 1900 census for Lamoure and we do not know her maiden name so it cannot be ascertained if she was living in Lamoure in 1900.

In 1920 little Evelyn has three siblings, Walter 7 years old, Marjorie 5 years old, and Lois 1 1/2 years old. Dietrich is no longer a butcher, but is a salesman in the general store.

By 1930 Bessie is a 47 year old widow living with two of her children, Walter and Marjorie. Lois is not listed on the census. She would have been 11 or 12 years old at this time, so I have assumed Lois, like Dietrich, has died.

::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::-::

Bessie's Granddaughter comments to say that for the most part my research was correct. I correctly identified the children and that Walter was her father. I was also correct that Lois died sometime before she was twelve, as Lois died when she was nine years old.

I was incorrect, however, that Bessie was a widow in 1930. I mistook an M (married) for a W (widow) in the 1930 census.

Bessie's husband Dietrich was alive and had moved to Mandan, North Dakota and continued working as a butcher. In his later years he lived with his son Walter's family until he died in 1962. At one time he owned a meat market in LaMoure.

Bessie's granddaughter did not elaborate on the circumstances. As I've said so many times, research is about the connections. And this connection held great sentimental value for me. My first attempt and my favorite.

Thank you to Bessie's Granddaughter for contacting me and for the correction. If you are reading this please contact me I have a few questions for you if you would be willing to share the information. You can email me at the footnoteMaven.

The web is an amazing and fascinating place, we must continue to try to make these important connections.

This article will be posted at Shades Of The Departed in the hope of connecting
with Bessie Suemper's granddaughter.



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Wednesday, August 6, 2008

Telephone - Telegraph - Tell A Blogger

Happy Blogiversary Schelly Talalay Dardashti and Tracing The Tribe. Tracing The Tribe, the fantastic blog about researching Jewish genealogy and named one of Family Tree Magazine's best websites for 2008, is two years old today. That's 10 in blog years. Here's to many more years of excellent writing, research and advice Schelly. You have a lot of loyal fans!

I had the great good fortune to meet and have lunch with Schelly and our good friend Lyn Blyden on Monday. What a woman! After the first hug it was as if we were friends who hadn't seen each other in years, not two strangers who had never met. We finished each other's sentences, ordered the same food and laughed at each other's puns.

Lunch was wonderful. (A special thank you to the Earth and Ocean restaurant in the W Hotel Seattle for taking such good care of us at lunch. And thank you Mr. Maven for making it happen.) The food, like the company, was to die for. We ordered three different desserts with three spoons and the noises coming from our table were reminiscent of a famous scene from the movie "When Harry Met Sally."

We were having so much fun, lunch lasted for three hours. We didn't want to leave. GeneaBloggers are the best people in the world. Kind and generous in writing they are even more so in person. Schelly baby - love you - you're the best.


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Monday, August 4, 2008

The Games Of The 2008 Genea-Bloggers Group


Guest Hosting - Smile For The Camera
October 2008


Category: Write, Write, Write!

Do you find birth dates, death dates and all the data boring if there's no narrative behind it? Don't you find the stories about ancestors more attractive than cut and dried census data? It takes time to be able to write about your family history and the more you write and the more often you write, the easier it is to bring your family to life for others to see.

4. E. Sign up to host a future carnival:

Criteria

You must email the footnoteMaven with the words Guest Host – Smile For The Camera in the email subject line.

In the body of the email select your favorite article from Shades Of The Departed and explain why it is your favorite.

The footnoteMaven will select the best answer to determine the host for the October 10 “Smile For The Camera.” The best answer will be featured on Shades Of The Departed.

As this is Write, Write, Write! let’s do just that.

All information for participation in the Summer 2008 Genea-Blogger Group Games can be found at AnceStories and Destination Austin Family.

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Sunday, August 3, 2008

What Did She Say?

54TH EDITION OF THE COG



The topic for the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy is:

YOUR FAMILY LANGUAGE

It's time to explain yourself.

- ¤ -

Get Out The Family Dictionary

Does your family use words and phrases
that no one else knows or understands?

- ¤ -

Where did they come from?

- ¤ -

Did you ever try to explain your "family language" to outsiders?

- ¤ -

Tell a story about your family-coined words, phrases, or nicknames.

- ¤ -

Donna Pointkouski will be hosting the
54th Edition of the COG at
What's Past is Prologue

The Deadline For Submissions Is August 15, 2008



Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 54th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.





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Friday, August 1, 2008

John Campbell Is Dead

This is another chapter from my attempt at creative non-fiction in writing my family history. This chapter opens with the vignette describing the funeral of my Great Great Grandfather John Campbell of Carrollton, Missouri, and segues into his last hours. All the information is factual, taken from obituaries, a cemetery transcription, county history books, county records, county atlas, accountings, bills, probate records, newspaper articles and information found in a document concerning my family held in the Western Historical Manuscript Collection. It is my submission for the 1 August Carnival of Genealogy.


THE HEAVY silvered coach harness was brought out and polished. Doc and Frank came up from the stable to be groomed. The big black coach was brought out washed and gone over carefully. An unusual sadness rested upon the community of Carrollton, Missouri. Uncle John Campbell was dead.

The pageantry of the funeral procession began and could have been likened to a circus parade had its purpose not been filled with such sorrow. Doc and Frank, harnessed to the big black hearse, led the procession to the Oak Hill Cemetery.

The casket bearers walked behind the horse drawn hearse as was customary. It was January and bitterly cold, but they walked. Sarah rode in the best coach, behind the hearse, pulled by Pinto and Pigeon in all their finery. The hostler sat high on the driver’s seat decked out in his Sunday best.

The coach was a work of art, gracefully shaped with a richly upholstered interior. I doubt Sarah noticed any of this, for John’s death was a shock to her and to the entire town. He had never before been sick a day in his life. Most of the townspeople knew John was ill, but few were aware that his illness was serious and no one was prepared for his death.

Next came Rusty teamed with either King or Billie pulling a coach carrying the rest of John’s family. It was a large procession; John Campbell had been a highly respected and much loved member of the community. Dick and Silverheel were pressed into service. Their silver harness had been polished and they had been groomed, they pulled the brougham.

The procession reached its final destination, Oak Hill Cemetery. A large fire had been built near the grave to protect the mourners from the bitter January cold. Rev. J. B. Jewel, in a most eloquent manner, officiated at the graveside service.

The grave was on the crest of a hill surrounded by trees in the southwest corner of the cemetery. The beautiful Missouri River valley John had loved could be seen for miles to the south. Under any other circumstances the crowd would have stopped to enjoy the view, but not today. Today, they mourned.

Family and friends said their final good-byes to a man of no small influence in their community, a man who throughout his life had set a very high standard for his children to emulate and his friends and colleagues to live up to. John Campbell would be missed.


:~:~:~:



It is Monday, January 1, 1883; John Campbell is working at the jail. He is tying up loose ends as he turns over the Office of Sheriff to the newly elected George Winfrey. The family has already moved home to the house on North Folger Street. It will be good to be home again, yet there is still much to be done here at the jail.

John must finish an accounting of the County’s money. Nine dollars must be paid to the West Side European Hotel for keeping the jurors in the December 9th trial. There are witness fees to disperse in all the court cases from the last few months of 1882, $3.50 to each witness. And the jurors must be paid as well, $1.00 per day for each day they served. Disbursements need to be made to the judges and clerks.

There are judgments to be collected and J.W. (Clinkscales) hasn’t received his paycheck as Deputy since July and he will want his $50.00, not to mention the money they owe John. So much paper work to do, but John is not feeling well and he decides to go home. He will never return to his office nor to the work at hand.

John has taken to his bed. Dr. Cooper is sent for, he makes a house call. The news is grave indeed. The doctor has diagnosed John with typhoid pneumonia. This is most probably neither typhoid nor pneumonia, but rather typhus. Typhoid is more common during the warm summer months, and this is an extremely cold January. Typhus is most often the culprit in the winter months, as it is transmitted by lice and fleas. John had just ordered an extermination of the rats trying to escape the cold by taking up residence in the jail, and it is well known they are carriers of lice and fleas.

Lozier & Kern deliver the medicine ordered by Dr. Cooper. They have been supplying the family with prescriptions and wine for medicinal purposes for years. All John’s life he has carried a flask containing wine, but he restricted his use to strictly medicinal purposes, he did not hold with drinking.

The wine would not protect him, not this time. Neither would the doctor or the drugs. John loses his battle to typhoid pneumonia at 11:00 p.m. on January 7, 1883, his family surrounding him. He is seventy-two years old. Sarah a widow at fifty-six has spent forty years of her life and all of her youth with John Campbell. Now she must live without him.

The family turns to R. T. Hubbell for the casket and box. Normally this is where they have purchased their furniture and looking glasses, but R.T. also provides wooden caskets to the town.
The casket costs $45, a large sum of money in 1883, but Sarah will have no less.
The Livery is contacted and arrangements made for the hearse and carriages. John Campbell is buried Tuesday, January 9, 1883, at Oakhill Cemetery in Carrollton, Missouri. :~:


Source:

The entire family history is heavily footnoted. The footnotes have been omitted based on my need to get this submitted in time for the carnival. Anyone with an interest in the source information may contact me by email and information will be provided. I intend to add the footnotes at a later date. How can someone named footnoteMaven omit her footnotes? I apologize, it has just been one of those weeks.


TheEnd