Thursday, June 26, 2008

"Ancestorizing"

The following poem was submitted to my favorite genealogical/family history magazine, the U.K.'s Your Family History, by Marion Gray. Marion's was the letter of the month in YFT 66. You can also find the poem on the magazine's website.

I love it! It is so, well, us.

ODE TO FAMILY HISTORY

I find it so emotional
As I scan the family tree
Just to trace the generations
Which all struggled afore me.
I study each in detail
And I bring each back to life;
Oh, each has had such troubles
Rife within a life of strife.
All tried to scratch a living
All a-swim against the tide;
All valiant and mindful
Of the family’s guarded pride.
Yet spells with little money
And a lack of useful work
Taught each, parental management,
Was a duty not to shirk.

Yet varying responses
Were expressed each dawning day
And in sundry-torn directions
Did my forebears make their way.
Some languished in the poor-house
With the family scattered wide;
Oh, what misery and heartache
For lost dreams and hope to ride.
And debtors prisons waited
To entrap more than a few,
Hoping hope against all hope
Someone could pay the due.
And who, of course, is blameless
When they steal their daily bread
To be scattered to the four winds
And to transportation sped.

Oh, what misery and heartache
Bring the mists unto the eye
Where Salvation’s hope is hastened
By necessity to die.
So hearken, generations
Of my family gone ahead,
I take interest in your story
For your memory’s not dead.
Oh, would that I had been there
In your greatest hour of need,
To give a little comfort
And some seed of hope to feed.
Too late now for assistance
Though remembered long in time
Beyond your comprehension
By the latest in your line.

IAN C. GREY
2008


Ian is also responsible for my new favorite word "Ancestorizing," known in the U.K. as "Ancestorising." I will add it to my all time favorite - blodging.

TheEnd

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Independent Spirit!


Independent Spirit!

- ¤ -

WE LOVE THEM!

Our Independent Family Members.
With the upcoming July 4th holiday, there is no more
perfect time to honor someone from your family
whose life can be summed up in one word
INDEPENDENT!

- ¤ -

Do you have a relative who was feisty, spoke their own mind,
was a bit of a free spirit?

- ¤ -

Anyone who most people might consider a “nut” on the
family tree but you know they really
just followed a “different tune?”

- ¤ -

We all have at least one person whose character and habits may
have made them seem “ahead of their time”
and now is the chance to tell us their story!

- ¤ -

The Deadline For Submissions Is July 1, 2008

51th Edition Of The COG
Thomas MacEntee
Desination: Austin Family blog


Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 50th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.



TheEnd

Sunday, June 15, 2008

Daughter of Lone Ranger - Make That Lil' Abner


Yes, that's the footnoteMaven on her steady steed, but for the life of me I can't remember the horses' name. From the picture you can tell I am not a cowgirl, but a farm girl. Dad used this horse to plow and it wasn't a horse that would get away from you. While he worked he'd thrown the little ones on and we would sit there for hours, going nowhere; just spending time with Dad and our imagination.

I do remember the day these photographs were taken. As you can see a storm was brewing. Mother was worried about the neighbor, "Mrs. Mary," who lived on the farm across the road. She sent Dad off to check on her.

I remember pushing a chair up to the kitchen sink, climbing up so I could see out the window, and watching Dad gallop off across the field. No saddle, he looked as if he was holding the horses' mane and going a hundred miles an hour. You can see looking at the horse a hundred miles an hour was obviously from the point of view of a child. The horse had never seen a hundred miles an hour.

Mrs. Mary was fine, but we had quite a storm. I waited on the chair for Dad to return. I remember the lightning as he rode up to the house and Mom shaking her head wondering out loud why he couldn't just take the car.

In each of these pictures you can see the family dog. One of many in a long line of Beagles that were working dogs as well as pets.

Every Sunday morning Dad, the dog, and the shotgun went out to bring home Sunday dinner.

"Hassenpfeffer," Mom would announce before she put the meal on the table.

Hassenpfeffer indeed! No fooling me, I knew a rabbit when I saw one.

Happy Father's Day Dad - the memories will always be good ones!

Photographs:

Maven On Horse.
Photograph. 1952. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2008.

Maven and Biblio On Horse. Photograph. 1952. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2008.

TheEnd

Thursday, June 12, 2008

footnoteMaven and Shades Experiencing Technical Difficulties

My apologies to my readers, but footnoteMaven and Shades are experiencing technical difficulties with our high speed internet provider, Comcast.

Articles, such as Friday From The Collectors, which are set to post automatically should do so without a problem. No new articles will post at this time. Comcast is working on the problem.

Smile For The Camera the 2nd Edition, Belles & Beaus, will be posted Saturday morning at the latest. Service is intermittent and not stable long enough for a posting with photographs.

Thanks for your patience, although I must admit, mine is wearing thin!

TheEnd

Tuesday, June 10, 2008

Two Heads Are Better Than One


He is handsome, she is pretty,
She’s the girl of New York city.

Let them say what they will,

She will love Jesse still.


Froggie Would A-Courting Go
Journal of American Folklore
1920

These are two of my favorite photographs of my Grandparents courting. They were so young and so adorable. They are not, however, alone. Just outside of this camera shot stand my Great Grandparents. They never let Lillian and Jesse be alone together while courting; they even traveled with them on their honeymoon tour. Once married, the newlyweds lived with my Great Grandparents for several years. That can not have been easy; fortunately my Great Grandparents loved Jesse. Everyone did.

What are they doing in the second photo, where they have their backs to us? Probably one of my Grandfather's photographic experiments. Notice how this experiment ended with his arm around my grandmother and hers around him. In a crowd - two heads are better than one!


TheEnd

Friday, June 6, 2008

Being Irish Is A Mystery For Me

Lisa at Small-Leaved Shamrock asks the question "What does it mean to be Irish?" in her 6th Carnival Edition. And it's a good question for me. I don't think I'm Irish, but I can't say that with any certainty.

In researching my family history I have found very strong ties to the Emerald Isle.

Here is the introduction to my Campbell family history:

On an Island Between Scotland and Ireland ca. 1700

It was said that on a clear day, from this isle, you could see the wash hanging on the clotheslines in both Scotland and Ireland. [1] And it is on this nameless island in Scotland; Rodger Campbell was born in ca. 1770. [2] As a young man, Rodger's family moved off the island to County Tír Eoghain [3] (Tyrone), Ireland. [4] Campbell is a Scottish surname, one of the ten most numerous in Scotland, and one of the thirty most numerous in Ireland. Two thirds of the Scots Campbells who came to Ireland in the 1600's settled in Northern Ireland, then known as Ulster.

Our Campbell Clan was founded by Gillespic Ó Duibhne, who lived in the thirteenth century, and was the first to assume the surname. His descendants included the most famous branch, the Campbell's of Argyll. It is family lore that we are a branch of the Argyll Clan Campbell, but as yet there is no evidence to substantiate this. The vast majority of Irish Campbells are descended from the Scottish family.

The family has handed down the belief that Rodger Campbell was born in Scotland and came to Northern Ireland in the late 1700's, the purpose of that move is unknown. It is possible that he arrived in Ireland to join family members who had moved there years before from Scotland or perhaps depressed economic conditions in his homeland forced the move.

It is in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland that Rodger met and married Mary Ashenhurst in ca. 1790. He gave his bride a trip to America for her honeymoon. America, a new start and a new life for them both; a life from which they would never return to County Tyrone. It was a trip to be remembered and a story to be told from one generation to the next in the Campbell Clan. Time And Chance Happened To Them All

As you can see, the ties are there, but what do they mean? I have far more questions then I have answers. Was Mary Ashenhurst Irish or English? What is the family doing in Ireland and why did they leave?

My sojourn into my Irish history has just begun. I'm working on several research strategies to help develop answers to these questions and many more.

As I don't know Rodger or Mary's parents names my first strategy is to look to the standard naming patterns of the Scottish, English, and Irish shown below.

STRATEGY
NAMING PATTERNS

Standard Scottish (S)
Naming Patterns

1st son -- father's father
2nd son -- mother's father
3rd son -- father
4th son -- father's brother
1st daughter -- mother's mother
2nd daughter -- father's mother
3rd daughter -- mother
4th daughter -- mother's sister

Standard English (E)
Naming Patterns

1st son -- father's father
2nd son -- mother's father
3rd son -- father
4th son -- father's eldest brother
1st daughter -- mother's mother
2nd daughter -- father's mother
3rd daughter -- mother
4th daughter -- mother's eldest sister

Standard Irish (I)
Naming Patterns

1st son -- father's father
2nd son -- mother's father
3rd son -- father
4th son -- father's eldest brother
5th son -- mother's eldest brother
1st daughter -- mother's mother
2nd daughter -- father's mother
3rd daughter -- mother
4th daughter -- mother's eldest sister
5th daughter -- father's eldest sister

What I Know:

FATHER: Rodger/Rodgers/Roger Campbell
MOTHER: Mary/Marcie Ashenhurst

1st Son – James (S,E,I) Father's father (Roger's Father would be James Campbell)
2nd Son – Thomas (S,E,I) Mother's father (Mary's Father would be Thomas Ashenhurst)
3rd Son – John William (S,E,I) Father (Doesn't fit - should have been Rodger not John William Campbell)
4th Son – William (S,E,I) Father's Eldest Brother (Roger's brother would be William Campbell)
1st Daughter – Sarah (S,E,I) Mother's mother (Mary's Mother would be Sarah Ashenhurst)
2nd Daughter – Ann (S,E,I) Father's mother (Rodger's Mother would be Ann Campbell)
3rd Daughter – Margaret (S,E,I) Mother (Mother is Mary Marcie, might be short for Margaret)
4th Daughter – Elizabeth (S,E,I) Mother's Eldest Sister (Mary's eldest sister would be Elizabeth Ashenhurst)

MY GREAT GREAT GRANDFATHER JOHN WILLIAM CAMPBELL:

-- John Campbell’s middle name is William
-- John Campbell names his first born child Mary William Campbell
-- John Campbell’s younger sister Ann names her 6th son William Grinder
-- John Campbell’s younger sister Margaret names her 2nd son William Sandusky

William may have some prominence in my family history.

Although not shown here, I have developed the strategy for each of the sons and daughters of Rodger and Mary as well as each of their children.

This does nothing more than give me a starting place in Ireland for a family search. Naming patterns are not definitive and, as shown above, don't always work as expected. (Note: No records found for Rodger and Mary in this country contain the names of their parents.)

So, what does being Irish mean to me? A mystery requiring a lot of hard work and research.

WISH ME LUCK!




TheEnd

Thursday, June 5, 2008

Smile For The Camera! - A Reminder


2ND EDITION
Smile For The Camera ~ A Carnival of Images

The 2nd Edition of Smile For The Camera takes its word prompts from the romance and weddings of the month of June. So, show us your belles and beaus. Choose a photograph of an ancestor, relative, yourself, or an orphan photograph that shows a memorable wedding, courting/dating, or a photograph depicting young/old love.


Your submission may include as many or as few words as you feel are necessary to describe your treasured photograph. Those words may be in the form of an expressive comment, a quote, a journal entry, a poem (your own or a favorite), a scrapbook page, or a heartfelt article. The choice is yours!

Deadline for submission is midnight 10 June, 2008.

HOW TO SUBMIT:

There are two options:

1. Send an email to the host, footnoteMaven. Include the title and permalink URL of the post you are submitting, and the name of your blog. Put 'Smile For The Camera' clearly in the title of your email!

2. Use the handy submission form provided by Blog Carnival, or select the Bumper Sticker in the upper right hand corner.

See you at the Carnival!


TheEnd

Wednesday, June 4, 2008

All Creatures Great And Small



OUR FAMILY HISTORY
THROUGH OUR FAMILY PETS
!

- ¤ -

WE LOVE THEM!

They're a part of our family.

- ¤ -

Bring out those old photos of Snoopy, Garfield, Rex and Bob!

- ¤ -

Tell us the funny, charming, and cute stories about
the pets you remember or remember hearing about.

- ¤ -

Introduce us to the furry, feathered, and
scaly members who have a place on your family tree!

- ¤ -

The Deadline For Submissions Is June 15, 2008

50th Edition Of The COG
Hosted by Bill West
West In New England


Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 50th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.




TheEnd

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Oh Grandma - What big bathing boots you have!


The bathing suits in which you dress
Are nothing much and mostly less,

And as you saunter to and fro

A lot of family traits they show.


~ J.P. McEvoy 1919 ~



TheEnd


I marvel every time I look at this photograph, how anyone thought they could swim in this outfit. A hat, a dress, stockings, and laced boots - all to go swimming? This is a photograph of my Grandmother when she was about eleven years old. Where she was going to go swimming is unknown; or even for that matter if she ever got wet. Note the man in the background wearing a wool swimsuit. I wonder if the weight of a wet wool swimsuit contributed to people drowning.

My Mother's family spent a great deal of time near the water. Note I have said near, as I have no photographs of them actually in the water. Before they were married, my grandparents would motor down to Edgemere from Flushing with my Great Grandparents on holiday. They stayed in one of the many cottages found there in the early 1900s.


Cottage At Edgemere
1915


Edgemere was a neighborhood in southwestern Queens on the Rockaway Peninsula. It is found between Beach 32nd and Beach 16th streets. It was home to the famous Edgemere Hotel built by Frederick Lancaster in 1895 and operated by him until 1919. He also owned many of the cottages.


Great Grandmother Salter
Edgemere 1915
Woman's Work Knows No Holiday



My Grandfather Greene
& The Hottest Car on Long Island
Edgemere 1915

This photo is the reason I believe my family motored out to Edgemere. My Grandfather loved to drive and was fond of what he called hot cars. Once on a visit to New York he took my sister and me for a ride in his Karman Gia which he called the "Hottest Car On Long Island." He drove so fast it scared my Mother and she had a conversation with he about speeding with her children in the car. He laughed, teased my Mother and she gave up on the lecture. We did not, however, go for a ride with Grandpa again. So it is an assumption on my part that he always had a hot car and that the family drove to Edgemere. Rail service at the time made it a very easy trip from Flushing, so perhaps they took the train and hired a car when they arrived.


Grandpa Greene & His Camera
Edgemere 1915


My Grandfather never went anywhere without a camera, and as you can see here, he had graduated to moving pictures. He documented everything. How I wish I knew where some of those old moving pictures were hidden.

Once they were married and my Uncle Edward was born the family would take the baby with them on their trips to the beach. Below is a photograph of the family having a picnic on the beach, fully clothed, hats, and ties with nothing that resembles a bathing suit.

Then of course, the baby had to be wheeled down the boardwalk - notice no bathing suits in sight. I'm beginning to get an idea of why the old photographers had the painted backdrops of the beach. No one actually put on a bathing suit and got wet during this period of time.


More Beach - No Suits
Bathing Suits That Is

I had started to think that perhaps it was just the part of the country. New York wasn't then and isn't now sunny California. Then I found the photograph below. Venice City, California, 1915, on the beach with Grandpa Greene. Dapper as always, but no bathing suit.


Venice Beach, California
1915

So it can only be the times or the family. My money is on the family. You don't see any photos of me in a swimsuit do you? We're a lot smarter than we look!

Sources:

Photographs:


Lillian Salter. Photograph. ca. 1908. Digital image. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007.

Cottage At Edgemere. Photograph. 1915. Digital image. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007.

Julia Salter Sweeping. Photograph. 1915. Digital image. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007.

Edward Greene In Car. Photograph. 1915. Digital image. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007.

Edward Greene With Camera. Photograph. 1915. Digital image. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007.

Picnic. Photograph. Unknown. Digital image. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007.

Boardwalk
. Photograph. Unknown. Digital image. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007.

Venice Beach
. Photograph. 1915. Digital image. Privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007