Monday, May 19, 2008

Isn't She Lovely?


A few months ago during ScanFest, I told the group about my favorite collection of old photographs. I collect women wearing glasses, 1800s to 1925. I lamented the fact that they were difficult to find.

I also confessed that I am writing a book about my collection - working title "My Blind Passion."

GenaBloggers are the best, at least one in particular. Jasia, Creative Gene, while off on an anniversary vacation, stumbled upon two such photographs and bought them for me!

The woman in pince nez (pinch nose) glasses to the right is one of those photographs.



Isn't she lovely? The glasses are probably pinned in her hair at the end of the chain, similar to the glasses pictured to the left. Yes, I have a small collection of old glasses.

I also love the watch pinned to her beautiful lace dress, she is a classic. Was she a writer, a photographer, a librarian, a teacher? We'll probably never know. This is a studio photograph, a card mount; the photographer is Stephenson of Richmond, Michigan.

There is another photograph, but I have plans for her. You'll see her in another post.

Jasia - I love your gift - thank you my BBF! Isn't she lovely?

TheEnd

On A Blanket With My Baby & The COG





SWIMSUIT EDITION - DARE TO SHARE !

- ¤ -

Why should Sports Illustrated have all the fun?

This is your chance to show off the bathing beauties in your family.

- ¤ -

Pull out the old photos of Grandma Moses in her seaside bloomers
Auntie Mae in her pin-up girl suit from the 1940s or 50s
Cousin Paula in her psychedelic bikini from the 1970s
You In A Speedo!

- ¤ -

Let's have some fun here!
Memorial Weekend is knocking on the door
The start of the summer sun, sand, and seaside season
Let's get in the mood with summer fun photos

- ¤ -

What?

You don't have any swimsuit photos you dare to share?

No problem!

Tell us your best family beach stories instead!

- ¤ -

The Deadline For Submissions Is June 1, 2008


Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 48th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.


TheEnd

Saturday, May 17, 2008

Dear Myrtle - A Photographic Survey Just For You

The sun has been shining here in Preston, Washington, for two days in a row. A very rare occurrence this year. So I jumped in my car and continued my Photographic Survey of Preston. But it was so beautiful I drove a little further down the road and took some pictures just for Dear Myrtle. The Rhodies are in bloom Myrt, and they are beautiful. Those pictured below are along the walkways at Snoqualmie Falls.

The Rhodies

Snoqualmie Falls is a 268 ft. waterfall on the Snoqualmie River between Fall City and Snoqualmie. Fall City is the next town over from my town of Preston. Snoqualmie Falls is one of our most popular scenic attractions and is known for its appearance in the television series Twin Peaks.

A Normal Year

With a record snowfall this year, record warm weather has brought more water to the falls than we have seen in years. It is spectacular! And I can't begin to describe the roar of the water as it drops over the edge. Deafening!


This Year!


Tons of Water (Gallons)
And No End In Sight


The Salish Lodge & Spa
Above The Falls



The Observation Deck
And A Rainbow


So Dear Myrtle, a little bit of home just for you. Washington misses you!






TheEnd

Thursday, May 15, 2008

A Pretty Girl Is Like A Melody

Until I started this article, I hadn't really thought of my Mother as a school girl, as the 14 year old bobby-sockser you see in the photograph to the right. She was just Mom. I took her intelligence for granted. As most children do, I took everything about her for granted.

She placed a very high premium on education and had a tremendous amount of reverence for the written word. The written word was sacred she always said. When I took down her high school yearbook and started to look through it for this article, I realized there were no autographs on the autograph page. Typical Mom, she would never have written in a book. They're sacred after all.

I've had her Bayside High School yearbook for many years, but I've never really looked at it, looked at the high school girl that was my mother. I guess I've thought I knew everything about her.

I'm looking more closely now, trying to be an objective researcher and historian, trying to suppress that familiarity born of being her child that kept me from really knowing my Mother the person. Looking at her the way others saw her or knew her.

Each entry in the Triangle Yearbook, Class of 1942, was accompanied by a saying - Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind - Desiring success, you shall have it. Some of the entries sounded a bit forced, as if those writing them really had to work to come up with something to say about the person pictured.


Bayside High School
32nd Avenue and 208th Street

Bayside, New York


My Mother's saying was - A pretty girl is like a melody, from the 1919 Irving Berlin song that had become popular again at that time. It didn't sound forced to me. It sounded as if the person writing it actually meant it. She was a pretty girl and she certainly came from the house of melodies (Carnegie Hall). At least, that is what I choose to believe.

Yearbook Entry

I wasn't surprised she was in the History and English Honor Classes, she was always a great homework resource, but I was surprised at all the sports; volleyball, tennis, and small games (whatever that might be). The only sport she discussed that I can remember was fencing and it's not listed here. Perhaps she had given it up by her senior year. She also had three years of Latin and spoke German. She had taken German, she said, so that she could talk to Papa. Papa was Louis Salter's father John, her great grandfather. So as a child I learned to sing German Christmas songs and say a phrase "telling others my name and asking if they spoke German."

She must have approved of the saying beside her name, because she was a member of the Triangle yearbook staff. She would never have allowed it to be printed if she didn't approve. Mother's that little thing in the middle of the picture below. Were you ever so young or so small? Somehow I thought you were born - well, my Mother.


Triangle Yearbook Staff

The yearbook also contained a Class Prophecy in which my Mother was prominently mentioned.

Rustling silk, shimmering velvet . . . Evening in Paris . . . immaculate white shirt fronts . . . shiny black top-hats . . . sables slung carelessly over shoulders . . . soft golden lights, a buzzing stream of chatter--all the glamour, suspense, and excitement of a gala Broadway opening night.

Not an ordinary opening night, mind you; not even Orson Welles, that fond memory, who has since gone to his eternal rest (onMars), was ever able to assemble such a sparkling galaxy. And no wonder. For that new bright light on the dramatic horizon is none other than that famous producer, Tommy Emma, preenting an original venture, which, according to advance press reports whould be the first on your "must see" list. And quite naturally too, for the whole show is studded with alumni of the Bayside High School.

While the audience is getting settled, let's take a look at the playbill "Variations on a Theme":

PROGRAM

1. AMERICAN PRELUDE

Aaron Ladman at the piano

2. "SNOW AND ICE"

featuring Janice Hamilton,
internationally known
performer
Chorus led by Veronica Kern

3. "PAN AMERICANA"

Spanish Serenade
Pat Zarth, vocalist

Tropic Tempos
Dances interpreted by
Gloria Cutting and
Harriet Waite

4. "MEMORIES"
Glee Club under direction
of Jimmy Lynch

5. "POETESS IN LOVE"
The Cast
The Poetess . . . . .Bette Taylor
The Hero. . . . . . .Ken LaBarre
The Villain . . . . .Harry Gardner

Play written by Joanne Michelson
Produced and directed by T. Emma
Settings designed and executed by
Jane Reynolds
Advertising by Regina Reckholder
and Margaret Cahill
Fire Notice: The exit indicated
by a red light and sign, nearest
to the seat you occupy, is the
shortest route to the street. In
the event of fire or other emergency
please do not run--WALK TO
THAT EXIT.
Joe Badger, Fire Commissioner.

With the conclusion of the first part of the show, we find ourselves at intermission time, and, having nothing to do, we follow the carpeted footsteps into the buzzing lobby. Familiar faces begin to emerge from the sea of sables, velvets, top-hats, and shirt fronts. Behold the famous society matron, Lillian Uppity (nee Greene), admiring the celebrated diamond necklace of Joyce Van Sniff (nee Lenz), who in turn is being guarded by our master detective, Bob Bingham. . .



How can I reconcile the young woman her friends thought was destined for sable, diamonds, and society with the woman who stood in our backyard in Missouri wringing the chicken's neck that was about to be dinner. I can't, I really didn't know her.

She went on to graduate that year and from there went directly into a four year degree nursing program. Until I read her yearbook I never knew that nursing had always been her goal. What was it that made your decision such an obvious one for you? There are no nurses in the family.


Graduation Photograph
1942


It was just a month shy of her graduation from nursing school when something happened that changed my Mother's life forever. War! The father and brother she adored had both enlisted. There was a parade down Fifth Avenue, a drive for war bonds with handsome young men in uniforms marching down the famous avenue. She told me there were soldiers who had been wounded that marched as well.

She was hanging out a window on Fifth Avenue waving as they marched by, when she was struck by the fact that she had to do something to contribute to the war effort. The next day, she dropped out of nursing school and enlisted in the Army. She did not go on to graduate, something she regretted all her life.

This wasn't the end of her education, she continued to take classes, even after I'd left home. She was one of the most intelligent women I've ever known, but there's so much more I should have known and I don't.

TheEnd

Sunday, May 11, 2008

2nd EDITION Smile For The Camera - A Call For Submissions

1ST EDITION SMILE FOR THE CAMERA POSTED
AT SHADES OF THE DEPARTED


2ND EDITION
Smile For The Camera ~ A Carnival of Images

The 2nd Edition of Smile For The Camera takes its word prompts from the romance and weddings of the month of June. So, show us your belles and beaus. Choose a photograph of an ancestors, relatives, yourself, or an orphan photograph that shows a memorable wedding, courting/dating, or photograph depicting young/old love.


Your submission may include as many or as few words as you feel are necessary to describe your treasured photograph. Those words may be in the form of an expressive comment, a quote, a journal entry, a poem (your own or a favorite), a scrapbook page, or a heartfelt article. The choice is yours!

Deadline for submission is midnight 10 June, 2008.

HOW TO SUBMIT:

There are two options:

1. Send an email to the host, footnoteMaven. Include the title and permalink URL of the post you are submitting, and the name of your blog. Put 'Smile For The Camera' clearly in the title of your email!

2. Use the handy submission form provided by Blog Carnival, or select the Bumper Sticker in the upper right hand corner.

See you at the Carnival!


TheEnd

Olympia, Wash., April 28, 1910

Washingtonians in 1910 had a very far-sighted state government, proclaiming Mothers' Day four years before President Woodrow Wilson did in 1914. They also weren't shy about mixing their government with religion, as you will see.



In accordance with a custom that has sprung up all over the United States of setting aside day for Mothers’ Day, Governor M.E. Hay has issued a proclamation naming Sunday, May 8, as Mothers’ Day in Washington. He requests that each person wear a white flower on that day and that special religious services be held in all the churches.





The proclamation follows:

A mother’s love – how sweet the name!
What is a mother’s love?
A noble, pure and tender flame,
Enkindled from above,
To bless a heart of earthly mold;
The warmest love that can grow cold;
This is a mother’s love.

In recent years there has sprung up in many portions of our land a most beautiful custom—that of setting aside one day in the year to be designated as Mothers’ Day. Of the many observances we have, there is probably none that appeals more to the average person than this, and as long as this nation shall endure, may this custom never die.

Therefore, in conformance with this usage, I, Marion E. Hay, governor of the State of Washington, do hereby designate and set apart Sunday, May 8, 1910, as Mothers’ Day, and do recommend and request that it be observed as such throughout this commonwealth. I urge that, on that day, all persons wear a white flower in acknowledgment and honor of the one who went down into the valley of the shadow of death for us. No more fitting place can be found for holding special services of this character than in our churches, and I request that all religious organizations throughout our State prepare a special program for this day, and I urge all good citizens to attend these services.

MOTHERS’ DAY OBSERVANCE IN SEATTLE, 1910

From A Seattle Newspaper

Within the past two years America has imported an established English custom, that of setting aside the second Sunday in May as “Mothers’ Day” and this year the churches, without regard to denomination, will use for their dominant sentiment the glory of motherhood and will exert every effort to make the day a time of tender remembrance.

The observance was first advocated in this country last year by the Presbyterian assembly. This year other denominations have take the matter up, and through their assemblies and local church circles it is expected that more than fifty Seattle pastors will give the subject prominence in the services tomorrow.

The call to observe the day is directed by the Presbyterian committee to the men particularly. Each man is asked to write a letter to his mother, if absent, tell her in person he loves her if she is living, and if she is dead, to wear a white carnation as a token of remembrance. The ladies are requested to bring bouquets of flowers as the outward expression of a similar sentiment.

Following last year’s precedent, the First Presbyterian Church in Seattle will make the floral offerings the subject of a special ceremony at the services at 11 a.m. tomorrow. At a given signal from Rev. M.A. Matthews, the pastor, all the women are to hold their bouquets aloft while the pastor pronounces a blessing, and at the close of the services the flowers will be gathered and placed on the graves of mothers whose relatives are not in the city to perform the duty.

In March 1909, when Governor Samuel Cosgrove died shortly after taking office, Republican Lieutenant Governor Marion E. Hay and his family became the first occupants of the Washington State Governor's mansion pictured above.


Saturday, May 10, 2008

The Hand That Rocks The Cradle



TO MY MOTHER
My little baby lies along my arm,
And, looking at her there, the glad tears press,
And, like a tidalwave of tenderness,
The years of love since I lay cradled so —
Unfathomed love enfolding me from harm —
Return and flood my life. For now I know.

Ann Devoore


FOUR GENERATIONS HELD IN
THEIR MOTHER'S ARMS


Julia Ernestine Fleischmann Salter
Lillian Elizabeth Salter



Lillian Elizabeth Salter Greene
Lillian Elizabeth Greene



Lillian Elizabeth Greene Campbell
footnoteMaven



footnoteMaven
endNote



Note: This was a group of photographs I framed for my oldest daughter as a Christmas present - to show her place in history. Oh yes, and to remind her she's the end of the line, hence endNote.

Photographs:

Julian Ernestine Fleischmann Salter - Lillian Elizabeth Salter. ca. 1904. Digital image. Photograph privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007

Lillian Elizabeth Salter Greene - Lillian Elizabeth Greene. ca. 1924. Digital image. Photograph privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007

Lillian Elizabeth Greene Campbell - footnoteMaven. ca. 1950. Digital image. Photograph privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2007

footnoteMaven - endNote. Photograph. 1968. Digital image. Photograph privately held by the footnoteMaven, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Preston, Washington. 2008

TheEnd

Friday, May 9, 2008

Hail Halvor!

Plans are firm for events honoring retiring Family Chronicle editor and publisher Halvor Moorshead. The 2008 NGS Conference is tightly scheduled, and some events overlap, but it will be easy for everyone to participate in a "Halvor" event!

I had the honor of meeting Halvor at a workshop in Spokane. He was a charming, engaging, witty man who demonstrated that he is an intregal part of those of us who have a passion for genealogy and family history.

If you will be attending the NGS Conference set aside some time to honor a member of our community who has contributed so much! If you are unable to attend send your best wishes online.

1. MAKE A DINNER RESERVATION


RSVP to Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com by Sunday 5pm. They're taking reservations for a special dinner to be held on Thursday, 15 May 2008 at the Hyatt Regency Crown Center Peppercorn restaurant. On a budget? No problem, as each will order from the menu. Dress is business casual and we'll make a special presentation to Halvor at this dinner.

2. SIGN HALVOR'S GUEST BOOK

The book will be available for your comments at the GenealogyBank.com booth in the exhibit hall Wed-Fri.

3. POST A COMMENT at HONORING HALVOR http://honoringhalvor.blogspot.com

Myrt will see that all entries are placed in Halvor's guest book. Entries must be submitted prior to 3pm Friday 16 May 2008 to be included in the guest book. All comments at the blog will remain a permanent tribute to Halvor.

4. CROSS-POST INFO:

This is Halvor
http://honoringhalvor.blogspot.com/2008/05/this-is-halvor.html

Join us in honoring Halvor
http://honoringhalvor.blogspot.com/2008/05/join-us-in-honoring-halvor.html

Can't be there in person?
http://honoringhalvor.blogspot.com/2008/05/cant-be-there-in-person.html

Dinner Thurs 15 May 2008
http://honoringhalvor.blogspot.com/2008/05/dinner-thurs-15-may-2008-in-kansas-city.html


TheEnd

Thursday, May 8, 2008

Mother Was A Blacksmith And A Man

Out of curiosity, which we all know killed the cat, and in honor of Mothers' Day I took a census trip in search of men named "Mother." And I actually found a few.

I had to wander through the Mother Superiors of the world, but found the following male Mothers:

Mother Campion was a 55 year old male who immigrated to this country from Ireland. He lived in Quincy, Illinois, in 1870 with his wife Margaret and was a blacksmith.

Mother Bell was a 57 year old male who lived with his wife Ida, their four sons, two grandsons and adopted daughter Sarah. He was a farmer in 1920 in Athens, Georgia.

Mother Collins was a five year old boy living with his grandmother, Lizzy Laney, in New Hanover, North Carolina in 1920.

Mother Lyon was a 37 year old male body builder living with his wife, Marion, in Fairfield, Connecticut in 1920.

Now just what were their Mothers thinking?

Sources:

Census:


1870 U.S. census, Adams County, Illinois, population schedule, Quincy, p. 515, dwelling 682, family 618, Mother Campion (Head); digital images. Heritage Quest (http://persi.heritagequestonline.com/ : retrieved 5 May 2008); citing NARA microfilm publication M593, roll 187.

1920 U.S. census, Adams County, Illinois, population schedule, Quincy, p. 8, dwelling 164, family 181, Mother Bell (Head); digital images. Heritage Quest (http://persi.heritagequestonline.com/ : retrieved 5 May 2008); citing NARA microfilm publication T625, roll 243.

1920 U.S. census, Adams County, Illinois, population schedule, Quincy, p. 93, dwelling 290, family 337, Lizzy Laney (Head); digital images. Heritage Quest (http://persi.heritagequestonline.com/ : retrieved 5 May 2008); citing NARA microfilm publication T625, roll 1312.

1920 U.S. census, Adams County, Illinois, population schedule, Quincy, p. 107, dwelling 53, family 86, Mother Lyon (Head); digital images. Heritage Quest (http://persi.heritagequestonline.com/ : retrieved 5 May 2008); citing NARA microfilm publication T625, roll 176.

Photograph:

Photograph Courtesy of The Library of Congress: The New Woman

Wednesday, May 7, 2008

I Smile For The Camera - Reminder

1ST EDITION
Smile For The Camera ~ A Carnival of Images
Submission Deadline - May 10 - Midnight

The 1st Edition of Smile For The Camera takes its word prompts from May's Mothers' Day. Choose a photograph of an ancestor, relative or an orphan photograph that embodies Love of Mother or a Mother's Love.


Your submission may include as many or as few words as you feel are necessary to describe your treasured photograph. Those words may be in the form of an expressive comment, a quote, a journal entry, a poem (your own or a favorite), or a heartfelt article. The choice is yours!

The "I Smile For The Camera" bumper sticker is yours for posting on your blog. Right click and copy.


SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Submissions for specific editions must arrive by 12:00pm PDT on the 10th of each month. Each carnival will be given word prompts to help you select the image(s) you wish to showcase.

Your submission may include as many or as few words as you feel are necessary to describe your treasured photograph. Those words may be in the form of an expressive comment, a quote, a journal entry, a poem (your own or a favorite), or a heartfelt article. The choice is yours!

HOW TO SUBMIT:

There are two options:

1. Send an email to the host, footnoteMaven. Include the title and permalink URL of the post you are submitting, and the name of your blog. Put 'Smile For The Camera' clearly in the title of your email!

2. Use the handy submission form provided by Blog Carnival, or select the "I Smile" Bumper Sticker in the upper right hand corner.

Hope To See you at the Carnival!


TheEnd

Ask The footnoteMaven



I received the following citation question from Lisa of 100 Years In American. 100 Years in America just celebrated its 100th post, congratulations Lisa!


footnoteMaven –

A bibliography question for you:

How do you cite a work by or interview with someone with a Ph.D.?

Smith, John, Ph.D., …

Smith, John (Ph.D.),…

…or do I leave off the Ph.D. entirely in a bibliographic reference?

Thanks for your expert opinion. I’m using MLA for a project and cannot find a reference to this.

Lisa


MLA (Modern Language Association) style is most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities.

Here’s how it’s done:

Do not list titles (Dr., Sir, Saint, etc.) or degrees (PhD, MA, DDS, etc.) with names. A book listing an author named "Jan Knowitall, PhD" appears simply as "Knowitall, Jan"; do, however, include suffixes like "Jr." or "II."

Putting it all together, a work by Dr. Tony Edmundson, Jr. would be cited as "Edmundson, Tony, Jr.," with the suffix following the first or middle name and a comma.

For more information on how to handle names, consult section 3.8 of The MLA Handbook and sections 6.6.1 and 3.6 of the MLA Style Manual.



An excellent site for MLA citation information is The Purdue Online Writing Lab (Owl).

TheEnd

Tuesday, May 6, 2008

Pacific Northwest Geneablogger Featured In Ancestry Magazine

Fellow Pacific Northwest Geneablogger Sue Edminster of the Echo Hill Ancestors Weblog has just had a family photograph featured in Details, Details, Details by Colleen Fitzpatrick, PH.D. in the current issue of Ancestry Magazine.

Sue had submitted her photograph to Colleen's Forensic Genealogy Website to be used as Quiz #35. Visit the site to see the excellent indepth analysis of this photograph.

And by the way, Sue is worried about Terry Thornton of Hill Country's attempts to become unfat, so she has submitted a cure for Terry when he becomes a shadow of his former self. Take a look at Sue's Special Quick Way To Put Pounds On!

TheEnd

Sunday, May 4, 2008

Mom, How'd You Get So Smart?



It's time for another lesson from Mom!
How Did She Get So Smart?


- ¤ -

Did Mom graduate from high school or
attend the school of hard knocks?

Did she attend a one room school house or
was she home-schooled?

- ¤ -

Tell Us About It - Tell Us Everything You Know

Was she the first in the family to attend college?

Maybe your mom took self-study courses or was an avid reader.

- ¤ -

How Did Mother Become So Brilliant!
(mother, grandmother, mother in law, godmother, etc.)


The Deadline For Submissions Is May 15, 2008



Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome and greatly appreciated!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the 48th Edition COG poster in the upper right hand corner of this page. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.


TheEnd

Thursday, May 1, 2008

That One Defining Moment

In the life of every family historian or collector of old photographs, there comes a defining moment. A moment when what you've always known in your heart, that this is what you were meant to do, becomes a reality. That defining moment came for me yesterday, April 30, 2008.

This year I started a new digital publication called Shades Of The Departed. It is here I write about my passion for collecting old photographs and how analyzing those photographs can fill in our family history. Every week I post a Photo Of The Week, one of those "orphan photographs" I buy on my many trips to flea markets, second hand stores, antique shops and auctions.

One of my first Photos Of The Week featured what is my favorite photograph in the collection, "the little girl wearing pearls". I was captivated by her from the moment my daughter brought her home to me. I would like to think that this connection was her reaching out from the past, urging me to find her family.

I analyzed the photograph and researched the name written on the back "Mary Irene Brunton Reynolds." I found the little girl had been married to a part of Northwest History - Edward "Tige" Reynolds, a famous political cartoonist. I wrote about what I had found.

There was more information concerning "Tige" Reynolds that I didn't include, because the focus was on the little girl. (That information is included in the Going Home article on Shades.)

In a comment to the article, Nikki-ann of Notes Of Life wrote:

Somebody has gone to the trouble of writing the little girl's name on the back of the photo (something that few people do, as you know). I wonder how it found it's way to an antique store. I'd be mortified if a relative gave away family photos, especially one who can be identified.

A brilliant analysis. Thanks for sharing :)

I answered Nikki-ann saying:

Maybe by saving this photo and posting the information a member of her family will find her.

There is only one known photograph of my GGGrandfather Campbell. Every day I say a little prayer that someone will find it and do our family a good turn.

Yesterday, I received the following email:

Dear sir or madam.

Today I was looking for some cartoons of Edward Reynolds, and to my shock I came across your website. I am the great-great granddaughter of the little girl in the photo posted (Mary Irene Brunton Reynolds). My name is Krista Reynolds; I am the daughter of Stephen Reynolds (who you mention in the analysis). I don’t know how you obtained the Brunton/Reynolds lineage but I am ever so grateful. We have lost everything in regards to our family due to unfortunate circumstances and I know nothing of my history. I am almost in tears to know you have found such detailed information.

The handwriting (I would know it anywhere) on the back of the photo is from my grandmother, Winona Reynolds who was married to Edward Brunton Reynolds. Both Edwards shared the nickname “Tige”.

I know this is in your private collection, but I would be ever so honored if I might have the photo or at least a copy.

Very truly yours,

Krista M. Reynolds

Now it is time for me to walk the walk. You can read the other comment and emails I received that answer Nikki-ann's thoughts regarding the photograph and share the "little girl wearing pearls" happily ever after in Going Home, Going Home, I Am Going Home!

TheEnd