Friday, June 6, 2008

Being Irish Is A Mystery For Me

Lisa at Small-Leaved Shamrock asks the question "What does it mean to be Irish?" in her 6th Carnival Edition. And it's a good question for me. I don't think I'm Irish, but I can't say that with any certainty.

In researching my family history I have found very strong ties to the Emerald Isle.

Here is the introduction to my Campbell family history:

On an Island Between Scotland and Ireland ca. 1700

It was said that on a clear day, from this isle, you could see the wash hanging on the clotheslines in both Scotland and Ireland. [1] And it is on this nameless island in Scotland; Rodger Campbell was born in ca. 1770. [2] As a young man, Rodger's family moved off the island to County Tír Eoghain [3] (Tyrone), Ireland. [4] Campbell is a Scottish surname, one of the ten most numerous in Scotland, and one of the thirty most numerous in Ireland. Two thirds of the Scots Campbells who came to Ireland in the 1600's settled in Northern Ireland, then known as Ulster.

Our Campbell Clan was founded by Gillespic Ó Duibhne, who lived in the thirteenth century, and was the first to assume the surname. His descendants included the most famous branch, the Campbell's of Argyll. It is family lore that we are a branch of the Argyll Clan Campbell, but as yet there is no evidence to substantiate this. The vast majority of Irish Campbells are descended from the Scottish family.

The family has handed down the belief that Rodger Campbell was born in Scotland and came to Northern Ireland in the late 1700's, the purpose of that move is unknown. It is possible that he arrived in Ireland to join family members who had moved there years before from Scotland or perhaps depressed economic conditions in his homeland forced the move.

It is in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland that Rodger met and married Mary Ashenhurst in ca. 1790. He gave his bride a trip to America for her honeymoon. America, a new start and a new life for them both; a life from which they would never return to County Tyrone. It was a trip to be remembered and a story to be told from one generation to the next in the Campbell Clan. Time And Chance Happened To Them All

As you can see, the ties are there, but what do they mean? I have far more questions then I have answers. Was Mary Ashenhurst Irish or English? What is the family doing in Ireland and why did they leave?

My sojourn into my Irish history has just begun. I'm working on several research strategies to help develop answers to these questions and many more.

As I don't know Rodger or Mary's parents names my first strategy is to look to the standard naming patterns of the Scottish, English, and Irish shown below.

STRATEGY
NAMING PATTERNS

Standard Scottish (S)
Naming Patterns

1st son -- father's father
2nd son -- mother's father
3rd son -- father
4th son -- father's brother
1st daughter -- mother's mother
2nd daughter -- father's mother
3rd daughter -- mother
4th daughter -- mother's sister

Standard English (E)
Naming Patterns

1st son -- father's father
2nd son -- mother's father
3rd son -- father
4th son -- father's eldest brother
1st daughter -- mother's mother
2nd daughter -- father's mother
3rd daughter -- mother
4th daughter -- mother's eldest sister

Standard Irish (I)
Naming Patterns

1st son -- father's father
2nd son -- mother's father
3rd son -- father
4th son -- father's eldest brother
5th son -- mother's eldest brother
1st daughter -- mother's mother
2nd daughter -- father's mother
3rd daughter -- mother
4th daughter -- mother's eldest sister
5th daughter -- father's eldest sister

What I Know:

FATHER: Rodger/Rodgers/Roger Campbell
MOTHER: Mary/Marcie Ashenhurst

1st Son – James (S,E,I) Father's father (Roger's Father would be James Campbell)
2nd Son – Thomas (S,E,I) Mother's father (Mary's Father would be Thomas Ashenhurst)
3rd Son – John William (S,E,I) Father (Doesn't fit - should have been Rodger not John William Campbell)
4th Son – William (S,E,I) Father's Eldest Brother (Roger's brother would be William Campbell)
1st Daughter – Sarah (S,E,I) Mother's mother (Mary's Mother would be Sarah Ashenhurst)
2nd Daughter – Ann (S,E,I) Father's mother (Rodger's Mother would be Ann Campbell)
3rd Daughter – Margaret (S,E,I) Mother (Mother is Mary Marcie, might be short for Margaret)
4th Daughter – Elizabeth (S,E,I) Mother's Eldest Sister (Mary's eldest sister would be Elizabeth Ashenhurst)

MY GREAT GREAT GRANDFATHER JOHN WILLIAM CAMPBELL:

-- John Campbell’s middle name is William
-- John Campbell names his first born child Mary William Campbell
-- John Campbell’s younger sister Ann names her 6th son William Grinder
-- John Campbell’s younger sister Margaret names her 2nd son William Sandusky

William may have some prominence in my family history.

Although not shown here, I have developed the strategy for each of the sons and daughters of Rodger and Mary as well as each of their children.

This does nothing more than give me a starting place in Ireland for a family search. Naming patterns are not definitive and, as shown above, don't always work as expected. (Note: No records found for Rodger and Mary in this country contain the names of their parents.)

So, what does being Irish mean to me? A mystery requiring a lot of hard work and research.

WISH ME LUCK!




TheEnd

2 Comments:

Blogger Laura said...

I am also quite interested in the so-called Scotch-Irish, because of the Reeds (I know that you have Reeds as well) and McCords. The latter turned up in County Tyrone in the early 18th century and were said to have come from Argyll before that; then they turned up in America Perhaps that was a common route.

My Reed ggg grandfather was supposed to have been born in 1791 in Coleraine, COunty Londonderry.

As you know, the Irish records are not always plentiful so this adds to the mystery!

I saw that your post-mortem lady (and Shades) made the Genealogue! I hope that lots of people come to read the post. Maybe one of them will recognize her and know her story...

June 8, 2008 at 8:26 AM  
Blogger Janice said...

fM,

Those standard naming patterns have led me on some wild goose chases, so watch out! :D

I enjoyed reading your story. The Scots from northern Ireland seemingly had an identity crisis... were they Scottish or were they Irish? :)

Janice

June 11, 2008 at 4:31 AM  

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