Wednesday, October 31, 2007

October 31, 1926 - Harry Houdini Dies In Detroit After Operations



The following are the New York Times articles regarding Harry Houdini's death. They include the news article from Detroit, and two obituaries.

Magician, Conscious to Last,
Loses Battle for Life In Detroit Hospital

Due To Poisoning

Playful Blow Given by Montreal
Student as Test Caused
Appendix to Break


Special to The New York Times

Detroit, October 31, 1926

Harry Houdini, world famous as a magician, a defier of locks and sealed chests and an exposer of spiritualistic frauds, died here this afternoon after a week's struggle for life, in which he underwent two operations.

Death was due to peritonitis, which followed the first operation, that for appendicitis. The second operation was performed last Friday. Like a newly discovered serum, used for the first time in Houdini's case, it was of no avail.

The chapter of accidents which ended fatally for the man who so often had seemed to thousands to be cheating the very jaws of death began early in October at Albany, N.Y. On the opening night of his engagement at a theatre there a piece of apparatus used in his "water torture cell" trick was overturned and struck him on the foot. Houdini called a physician from the audience, had his foot examined and them completed his performance. Afterward he went to a hospital and had the injured foot X-rayed.

Appendicitis Follow Blow

A bone was found to be partly fractured and Houdini was advised to discontinue his tour a few days and give prompt attention and plenty of rest to the injured foot. He declined to cancel his engagements, however, and did not miss a show.

From Albany he and his company went to Schenectady. Houdini was suffering continuous pain and returned to Albany for several treatments. By the time he left Schenectady for Montreal his whole system was in a weakened condition.

On Tuesday, Oct. 19, while in Montreal he addressed a class of students on spiritualistic tricks. During the reception following the address he commented on the strength of his stomach muscles and their ability to withstand hard blows without injury.

One of the students without warning or giving time for Houdini to prepare struck him twice immediately over his appendix. He suffered no distress at the time but after he had boarded a train for Detroit he complained of pain. At first he attributed it to something he had eaten but as it increased he called in the company's nurse who in turn arranged by wire to have a physician meet the magician in Detroit.

Dr. Leo Kretzka, a prominent physician, made a hurried examination and told the patient there were symptoms of appendicitis. He left Houdini to decide whether it would be advisable for him to appear that evening at the Garrick Theatre for the opening night of the show. Houdini would not disappoint his admirers.

Looking back on that last performance, the large audience now realizes that the famous magician did his tricks under a great strain. He felt the grip of bonds he had never tested, the snap of a lock not forged by human hands. He was worried for one of the few times in his career and was plainly not up to his best form on some of his tricks.

Conscious Until Death

At his hotel after the performance the pain increased. The house physician and the best Detroit could furnish were called. Houdini was taken to Gray Hospital and the following afternoon underwent an operation for appendicitis. His removal from the hotel to the hospital was made at the suggestion of his family physician, William Stone of New York City, who had been notified by telephone of his friend's condition.

Until his death Houdini was conscious and his mind was keen and alert. The physicians who attended him say he was the best patient they ever had, and he helped them wonderfully. His mental attitude, combined with his unusual stamina, did much to prolong his life.

According to statements made by the physicians, the playful punches he received in Montreal were the direct cause of Houdini's death, for one of the blows caused the appendix to burst, saturating his system with poison.

Streptococcus peritonitis, which developed soon after the operation last Monday, seriously complicated the case. This is a particularly virulent form of poisoning, and few cases are know to the medical profession where persons suffering from it have recovered.

The body will leave Detroit for New York in a special car Monday evening, arrive in New York Tuesday morning about 9 o'clock. [1]

*******


The Society of American Magicians

Officers and members are hereby informed that our illustrious President, Harry Houdini, has bowed to the mandate of the Mighty Magician. You are requested to attend the funeral services at the Elks Club, 108 West 43rd St., Thursday, Nov. 4, 10:30 A. M. [2]

*******


Died

HOUDINI - On October 31, after a brief illness, at Detroit, Mich., Harry, beloved husband of Beatrice Rahner, brother of Nat J. Weiss, Theo Hardeem, Dr. Leopold D. Weiss and C. Gladys Weiss. Funeral Services at B.P.O. Elks Lodge No. 1, 108 West 43d St., Thursday, Nov. 4, at 10:30 A.M. Remains lying in state at the West End Funeral Chapel, 200 West 91st St., until Thursday morning. [3]

*******

"Houdini was born Erik Weisz in Budapest in 1874, the son of a rabbi. At a young age, he immigrated with his family to Appleton, Wisconsin, and soon demonstrated a natural acrobatic ability and an extraordinary skill at picking locks. When he was nine, he joined a traveling circus and toured the country as a contortionist and trapeze performer. He soon was specializing in escape acts and gained fame for his reported ability to escape from any manacle. He went on his first international tour in 1900 and performed all over Europe to great acclaim. In executing his escapes, he relied on strength, dexterity, and concentration--not trickery--and was a great showman.

In 1908, Houdini began performing more dangerous and dramatic escapes. In a favorite act, he was bound and then locked in an ironbound chest that was dropped into a water tank or thrown off a boat. In another, he was heavily bound and then suspended upside down in a glass-walled water tank. Other acts featured Houdini being hung from a skyscraper in a straitjacket, or bound and buried--without a coffin--under six feet of dirt.

In his later years, Houdini campaigned against mediums, mind readers, fakirs, and others who claimed supernatural talents but depended on tricks. At the same time, he was deeply interested in spiritualism and made a pact with his wife and friends that the first to die was to try and communicate with the world of reality from the spirit world. Several of these friends died, but Houdini never received a sign from them. Then, on Halloween 1926, Houdini himself passed on at the age of 52. His wife waited for a communiquÉ from the spirit world but it never came; she declared the experiment a failure shortly before her death in 1943." [4]


*******



______________________
[1] Special to The New York Times, "Harry Houdini Dies After Operations." The New York Times (1857-Current file), 1 November 1926, online historical archives (http://hngraphical.proquest.com/hnweb/
hnpl/do/document?set=searchalleras&lastset=&rendition=x-article-image&start=
1&inmylist=false&urn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-
article-image%3B98403302&pagemapurn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%
3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-pagemap%3B98403302&pageimageurn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%
3BHNP%3BPQD%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-pcpage-image%3B98403302&mylisturn=urn:proquest:
US;PQDOC;HNP;PQD;HNP;PROD;x-citation;98403302&pdfurn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%
3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-article-image%3B98403302&abstracturn=urn
:proquest:US;PQDOC;HNP;PQD;HNP;PROD;x-citation;98403302&returnpage=document&doframe
=1 : accessed 30 October 2007), citing original pg. 1
[2] Died, "Houdini, Harry The Society of American Muscians." The New York Times (1857-Current file), 3 November 1926, online historical archives (http://hngraphical.proquest.com/hnweb/hnpl/do/
document?set=searchalleras&start=1&rendition=x-article-image&inmylist=
false&urn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%3BHNP%3BPROD%
3Bx-article-image%3B98403302&mylisturn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%
3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-citation%3B98403302 : accessed 30 October 2007), citing original pg. 23.
[3] Died, "Houdini, Harry Oct. 31 After A Brief Illness." The New York Times (1857-Current file), 3 November 1926, online historical archives (http://hngraphical.proquest.com/hnweb/hnpl/do/
document?set=searchalleras&start=1&rendition=x-article-image&inmylist=
false&urn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%3BHNP%3BPROD%
3Bx-article-image%3B98403302&mylisturn=urn%3Aproquest%3AUS%3BPQDOC%3BHNP%3BPQD%
3BHNP%3BPROD%3Bx-citation%3B98403302 : accessed 30 October 2007), citing original pg. 23.
[4] "Houdini Is Dead," The History Channel website, This Day In History (http://www.historychannel.com/thcsearch/thc_resourcedetail.do?encyc_id=214843 : accessed 31 October 2007). Copyright The History Channel 2007.

Bring Your Ancestors Together - At A November - December Genealogy Event Near You

L - R, Maid holding iron, Maid holding ladies mirror, Maid holding hand broom, Maid holding rug sweeper, Outdoor Man servant, Kitchen Maid holding bucket.
Photograph In Possession Of Author

Seattle, Washington - Western Washington

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2007


NOVEMBER 2007

Thursday 1 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

MAC COMPUTER INTEREST GROUP
dBug Resource Center, 9620 Stone Avenue North, Suite 202, Seattle
Meeting 7pm - 9pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Thursday 1 November
South King County Genealogical Society

The Legacy Users Group
Church of Latter-Day Saints at 24419-94th Ave. So., Kent
Meeting 10.30am to 12noon
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Saturday 3 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

CANADIAN INTEREST GROUP
Canadian Research Overview - II"

SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 10.15am – 12.15pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 7 November
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF)

Military Records: War of 1812 - Karl Kumm
Fiske Library at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Tuesday 6 November
South King County Genealogical Society

The Legacy Users Group
Church of Latter-Day Saints at 24419-94th Ave. So., Kent
Meeting 10.30am to 12noon
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 7 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: MISSOURI
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Thursday 8 November
South King County Genealogical Society

TMG Users Group
Algona-Pacific Library at 255 Ellingson Rd, Pacific
Meeting 1pm to 3pm
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Thursday 8 November
Eastside Genealogical Society

Brick Wall Panel
Bellevue Regional Library at 1111 110th Avenue NE, Bellevue
Meeting starts at 6pm.
Cookie Social and Annual Show and Share.
Visit Eastside Genealogical Society (EGS) for more information.

Thursday 8 November
Seattle Central Library

American Creation: Triumphs and Tragedies at the Founding of the Republic - Joseph Ellis
Microsoft Auditorium at 1000 Fourth Ave., Seattle
Lecture starts at 7pm.
Visit Seattle Central Library - Classes and Events for more information.

Saturday 10 November
Heritage Quest Research Library

Using Family Tree Maker - Jim
Heritage Quest Library at 909 Main Street, Suite 5
Sumner
Class runs from 9am to 11am. Admission is free.
Visit Heritage Quest Research Library for more information.

Saturday 10 November
Genealogy and Family History Alumni Association

Starting Your Own Genealogy/Family Research Blog - Linda Palmer
Redmond Regional Public Library at 15990 N.E. 85th, Redmond
Class runs from 10am to 12.30pm. Admission is free.
Visit Genealogy and Family History Alumni Association for more information.

Saturday 10 November
NARA-Seattle

Naval Reserve Records at the National Archives (pre and post World War II)
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Time 10am - 11am. Free
Visit NARA for more information.

Saturday 10 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

COMPUTER INTEREST GROUP
High Tech Toys for Genealogists - Bring your experiences (and toys) to share!

Location to be announced.
Meeting 10.30am – 12.30pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 10 October
NARA-Seattle

Obtaining Copies of YOUR OWN Military and Veteran's Records
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Time 11.30am - 12.30pm. Free
Visit NARA for more information.

Saturday 10 November
Seattle Central Library

What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America 1815-1848 - David Walker Howe
Microsoft Auditorium at 1000 Fourth Ave., Seattle
Lecture starts at 2pm.
Visit Seattle Central Library - Classes and Events for more information.

Saturday 10 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

Family History Expo VII" - Annual all day event.
Redmond Family History Center at 10115 172nd Ave NE, Redmond
Check back for details.
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Monday 12 November
Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State

Creative Ways to Share and Preserve Your Family History - Steven P. Schwartz
Stroum JCC at 3801 East Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Lecture 7pm. Admission is free for JGSWS members, $5 for nonmembers.
Visit Jewish Genealogical Society for more information.

Monday 12 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

SGS PROGRAM MEETING
Evidence Explained: Bible? Or the Penultimate Word? - Karl Kumm
Publication of Elizabeth Shown Mills' new book Evidence Explained has been much anticipated by the genealogical community. It has been hailed as a new "bible." Is it the final word? The aim of this discussion is to point to some of its limitations, and to raise some questions about her recommendations.

SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 7pm – 9pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Tuesday 13 November
Tacoma-Pierce County Genealogical Society

Research Problems - Round table discussion
Bates Technical College at 1101 South Yakima Avenue, Tacoma
Meeting 7pm
Visit the TPCGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 14 November
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF)

King County Archive - Off-Site Visit
Class runs from 10am to 12noon.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Wednesday 14 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: OHIO
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Thursday 15 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: MASSACHUSETTS - Salem
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 10.15am – 12.15pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Thursday 15 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: CONNECTICUT Witches
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 17 November
South King County Genealogical Society

General Meeting
First Baptist Church of Kent at 11420 SE 248th St, Kent
Meeting 9.30am to 12noon
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Saturday 17 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

IRISH INTEREST GROUP
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 10.15am – 12.15pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 17 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

GERMAN INTEREST GROUP
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1Pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Tuesday 20 November
South King County Genealogical Society

Computer Interest Group
Auburn Library at 1102 Auburn Way S., Auburn
Meeting 6.30pm to 8.30pm
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Monday 26 November
South King County Genealogical Society

Heritage Photo Interest Group
Auburn Fire Department at 1101 D St NE, Auburn
Meeting 6.30pm to 8.30pm
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 28 November
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF)

Brick Wall Workshop - Gary Zimmerman
Fiske Library at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

DECEMBER 2007

Saturday 1 December
Seattle Genealogical Society

CANADIAN INTEREST GROUP
Canadian Research Overview

SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 10.15am – 12.15pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Monday 3 December
Seattle Genealogical Society

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE and BOOK SALE
Stop by for punch and cookies, browse the book sale, and purchase gift memberships in SGS.

SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Open House 5pm – 8pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 5 December
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF)

Preparation For Salt Lake - Betty Kay Anderson
Fiske Library at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Saturday 8 December
NARA-Seattle

The First Shot Fired at Pearl Harbor: The Exciting Career of the USS WARD
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Time 10am - 11am. Free
Visit NARA for more information.

Saturday 8 December
Seattle Genealogical Society

COMPUTER INTEREST GROUP
Topic To Be Announced

Location to be announced.
Meeting 10.30am – 12.30pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 18 December
NARA-Seattle

A Short History of War Photography
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Time 11.30am - 12.30pm. Free
Visit NARA for more information.

Saturday 18 December
NARA-Seattle

Other Little-Known Attacks on US Soil During World War II
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Time 1.30pm - 2.30pm. Free
Visit NARA for more information.

Saturday 9 December
Association of Professional Genealogists

The Process of Certification - The New Rules - Roundtable Discussion
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way, Seattle
Discussion runs from 10am to 12noon.
Visit APG for more information.

Monday 10 December
Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State

A Wealth of World Jewish Records - Michael Goldstein
Stroum JCC at 3801 East Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Lecture 7pm. Admission is free for JGSWS members, $5 for nonmembers.
Visit Jewish Genealogical Society for more information.

Saturday 15 December
Seattle Genealogical Society

IRISH INTEREST GROUP
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 10.15am – 12.15pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 15 December
Seattle Genealogical Society

GERMAN INTEREST GROUP
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm - 3pm SGS Website for more information.

Tuesday 18 December
Computer Interest Group
Auburn Library at 1102 Auburn Way S., Auburn
Meeting 6.30pm to 8.30pm
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

*******

Tuesday, October 30, 2007

Good Things Happen To Good People



Across the Street and Down The Road


Just down the road from where I live something good has happened to a truly good person. Chery Kinnick, Nordic Blue, has written and published, Snoqualmie Pass, by Acadian Publishing.

Chery and I both attend the Nearby History Seminar for Researchers and Writers at the Museum of History and Industry in Seattle, and I can attest to her research skills and her wonderful writing ability. I am always in awe of the beautiful stories she has contributed to our seminar.

I've ordered my copy of Snoqualmie Pass and I hope when it arrives Chery will autograph it for me.

It's a beautiful reminder of the history just down the road from where I live.

Congratulations, Chery!

*******

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Sunday, October 28, 2007

Mary Todd Lincoln's Bloody Cloak

"'Biohistory'—the combination of biological testing and history—is one of the most exciting new fields of scientific inquiry."

~ Lori Andrews ~


On the evening of April 14, 1865, Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln attended a performance of "Our American Cousin" at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C. Here, as we are all aware, President Lincoln was shot in the back of the head by assassin John Wilkes Booth.

Two physician's were attending the performance and rushed to the president's box where they tried desperately to save President Lincoln's life. One of those physicians, Dr. Charles S. Taft, cut away a small patch of Lincoln's hair in an attempt to treat the bullet wound.

On April 15, 1865, President Lincoln died without having regained consciousness. Dr. Taft held on to the patch of hair throughout the night. After Lincoln passed away, Taft tried to return the lock of the dead President's hair to his widow. She refused and asked the doctor to keep it as a gift for his efforts in trying to save the president's life. Dr. Taft kept those strands of hair and they became a family heirloom handed down to many subsequent generations. [1]

One of the most powerful artifacts related to this terrible event is the cloak allegedly worn by Mrs. Lincoln on the night of the assassination. Mary purportedly gave the cloak to former slave and personal confidante, Elizabeth Keckley.

"Mrs. Lincoln gave away everything intimately connected with the President, as she said that she could not bear to be reminded of the past. The articles were given to those who were regarded as the warmest of Mr. Lincoln's admirers. All of the presents passed through my hands. The dress that Mrs. Lincoln wore on the night of the assassination was given to Mrs. Slade, the wife of an old and faithful messenger. The cloak, stained with the President's blood, was given to me, as also was the bonnet worn on the same memorable night. Afterwards I received the comb and brush that Mr. Lincoln used during his residence at the White House." [2]

The cloak is owned by the Chicago Historical Society. Recently, the family of a person suffering from Marfan Syndrome approached the Society asking that DNA testing be done on the cloak. It has been speculated by doctors for quite some time that Lincoln suffered from Marfan and the family making the request hoped a definitive result would increase interest and funding into the disease. [3]

Testing of the cloak may not be as straight forward as you might think. It is possible Lincoln's blood is not the only blood on the cloak. Henry Rathbone, a guest in the Lincolns' box, was slashed by the knife of assassin John Wilkes Booth's. Rathbone bled profusely and some of his blood may be mixed with that of the President on Mrs. Lincoln's cloak. How many hands has the cloak passed through from Mrs. Lincoln to the Historical Society? The chain of evidence of historical artifacts such as the cloak may be problematic, particularly where they have been kept and handled by amaturers.

So, while the cloak belongs to the Historical Society, does the DNA on the cloak? Do the results of DNA testing belong to the Society, the public, Lincoln ancestors, or to history?

Many Illinois and North Carolina residents are anxious to match their DNA to this most beloved U.S. President. But what if something shows up in Lincoln's DNA that would cast aspersions on Lincoln or his presidency? Is everything fair game, even if it changes how we view history?

What are the rights of the departed historical figures and their living relatives? Whose permission will be required if any to allow testing? Will the results of the testing be made public? How might medical information impact living relatives?

I, for one, don't have the answers; I don't even know all the questions. The law and biohistory are not presently in the same moment. The National Conference of State Legislatures indicates that consent to perform a genetic test is only required in the following states - Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, South Carolina, South Dakota and Vermont. Lori Andrews, an attorney who was asked by the Chicago Historical Society to help create guidelines for genetic research, is the author of more than 100 articles on genetics, alternative modes of reproduction, and biotechnology. Her book, Future Perfect: Confronting Decisions About Genetics (New York: Columbia University Press, 2001), outlines the policy models that should be considered in an age of increasing knowledge of the human genome. Progress is being made and hopefully we will soon have the answers we seek, provided of course we ask the correct questions.

I firmly believe that no harm can ever come from presenting the truth with regard to history. History doesn't change, only the facts and our perception of those facts change. Jeremy Boggs of the Center for History and New Media wrote, ". . . History is never finished, and no one ever really writes the "final word” or “final version” of history. We’re always adding to our historical knowledge, always improving and adding to our various historical narratives. History, then, is perpetual beta." I could not agree more. History is perpetual beta.

In 1999, the Chicago Historical Society and the University of Illinois at Chicago hosted a conference of historians, forensic scientists, and preservationists to consider authentication of Mary Todd Lincoln's cloak. [4] They recommended that DNA testing of the cloak not be done at that time. They determined the process would be too destructive to the cloak and there is no Lincoln genetic marker. At this time investigators are conducting an analysis of the material of the cloak. They are also looking for relatives of Nancy Hanks to provide a mitochondrial DNA reference sample.

The Chicago Historical Society has created a comprehensive website titled Wet With Blood: The Investigation of Mary Todd Lincoln's Cloak that tells the story of the artifacts and their investigation. The site was developed by the Historical Society and Northwestern University, assisted by associations ranging from the Illinois State Police Forensic Sciences Command to the Chicago Institute of Music Chorale. Although not providing answers, it is very interesting reading.

I would also recommend the article Secrets From The Grave, written by Lori Andrews for Parade Magazine. It was the inspiration for this blog article and is an excellent discussion of where we are and where we are going.

For a light hearted look at DNA testing read Marie Antoinette, Is That You?, by Michelle Slatalla for the New York Times. I recognized her husband, I think I live with his clone.

______________________
[1] Several of them were even set into a ring and given as a gift to President Theodore Roosevelt. Lathrop-Vitu, Lesley. "Lincoln's Locks: The Relics of a Secular Saint". Illinois Humanities Council. (http://www.prairie.org/index.cfm/fuseaction/
dir_resources.detours_page/page_id/c45e3670-53c8-4ade-8a3b-b706d04c6609/
object_id/42c251b0-4088-4654-a1a9-176056c3f082/
LincolnsLocksTheRelicsofaSecularSaint.cfm : 20 October 2007)
[2] Keckley, Elizabeth. Behind the Scenes; Or, Thirty years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House. University of Michigan Web Site (http://moa.umdl.umich.edu/cgi-bin/moa/
sgml/moa-idx?notisid=ABN905 : 20 October 2007).
[3] People with Marfan syndrome tend to have tall and slender bodies with arms and legs disproportionately long compared to the trunk. They also usually have long fingers and toes. The ligaments and joints are typically loose. Because of rib overgrowth, the chest may protrude or be indented. Abnormal curving of the spine, called scoliosis (sko-le-O-sis), lordosis (lor-DO-sis), or kyphosis (ki-FO-sis), can occur.http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/mar/mar_whatis.html
[4] Testing for Marfan syndrome is not a part of the Chicago Historical Society's collaborative investigation.

Photograph:

Unknown, photographer. “[Lincoln, Mrs. Abraham.]” Photograph. Washington, D.C.: L.C. Handy Studios, c1860-1865. From Library of Congress: Brady-Handy Collection, 1861-1865. (http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/
I?fsaall,app,brum,detr,swann,look,gottscho,pan,horyd,genthe,var,cai,cd,
hh,yan,bbcards,lomax,ils,prok,brhc,nclc,matpc,iucpub,tgmi,lamb:20:./temp/
~pp_lmVG::displayType=1:m856sd=cwpbh:m856sf=03451:@@@mdb=fsaall,app,brum,detr,
swann,look,gottscho,pan,horyd,genthe,var,cai,cd,hh,yan,bbcards,lomax,ils,prok,brhc,
nclc,matpc,iucpub,tgmi,lamb : 12 October 2007).

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My New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

I had just received my new Oxford Rhyming Dictionary and was sitting at the kitchen table taking it for a ride when my husband stopped by for a cookie.

"Isn't it amazing," I gushed. "A dictionary full of words that rhyme."

"The amazing part," he fake smiled, "is that someone would buy it."

A momentary lapse. In my excitement over my new dictionary I'd let down my defenses. The husband vs. the dictionary controversy reared its ugly head.

"So what word are you looking for?" he wanted to know.

"A word that ends in 'p' or 'p-e-e'," I replied without looking up.

"That's easy," he said as he headed out the back door. "Beer."

And the footnoteMaven takes another blodging hit.

Saturday, October 27, 2007

Ask The Genetic Genealogist

Dear Dr. DNA:

My cousin was recently diagnosed as having sickle cell trait. People who inherit only one copy of the sickle cell gene (from one parent) do not have sickle cell anemia; they have sickle cell trait. Her physician has told her that she "has a Black ancestor," but from my limited research on the web I have found several possibilities for the gene.

Sickle cell anemia is most common in people whose families come from Africa, South or Central America (especially Panama), the Caribbean islands, Mediterranean countries (such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy), India, and Saudi Arabia.

In the United States, sickle cell anemia affects mainly African Americans, with the condition occurring in about 1 in every 500 African American births. Hispanic Americans also are affected; the condition occurs in 1 out of every 1,000 to 1,400 Hispanic American births.

About 2 million Americans have sickle cell trait. About 1 in 12 African Americans has sickle cell trait. (This does not tell us how many of the 2 million with sickle cell trait are African American.)

Sickle cell trait can be inherited in the following ways:

-- Both parents have sickle cell anemia (inherit from one parent);
-- One parent has sickle cell anemia (inherit from this parent);
-- Both parents have sickle cell trait (inherit from one parent);
-- One parent has sickle cell trait (inherit from this parent).

My cousin is Caucasian. We are cousins on my father’s side. Both of her parents are dead; she has one sister and one brother, both living. There is an aunt on our father’s side and an uncle on her mother’s side that are living. There are many cousins on both sides.

Knowing that I am the family historian she has written me to ask if I have found any evidence of a Black ancestor on my father’s side. I have not. On my father’s side I have found nothing yet to indicate an ancestor that is African American, Hispanic, or an ancestor from any of the listed geographic areas.

So Dr. DNA, puzzle me this:

How could DNA testing shed light on this very interesting family history development?

1.Could DNA testing determine the ethnicity of this ancestor?
2.Could DNA testing determine if the ancestor was on the paternal or maternal side of her family, or perhaps both?
3. Could DNA testing determine the geographic origin of this ancestor?
4. Could DNA testing determine the generation of this ancestor?
5. How far back in time is it possible that this ancestor lived (100 years, 1,000 years)?
6. Who in the family should be tested?
7. What type of DNA test should be conducted?

I broached this question to a Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation representative at a conference. He dismissed my question with, "Why do you want to know?" Why indeed! I am a family historian who has had a family mystery laid directly on my doorstep. Can modern science help me solve this mystery? Please, tell me more!

footnoteMaven

Source:

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. National Institute of Health. “Who Is At Risk For Sickle Cell Anemia?,” Diseases and Conditions Index, (http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/dci/Diseases/Sca/SCA_WhoIsAtRisk.html : 20 October 2007).

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Thursday, October 25, 2007

Checking Out The Local Color

Across The Street and Down The Road


We had a good friend visit from California so we took some time to check out the local color. I thought we bloggers on the West Coast should flash a little autumn splendor for those of you in the rest of the world.

It's beautiful here in Washington state and one of the best rides to experience that beauty is the Cascade Loop Scenic Drive. We made a day of it and saw some very beautiful scenery. It's a shame, but we never take this ride unless we have visitors, so I'm promising myself this little mini-vacation next year even if no one comes to visit.


Want To Know More About The Cascade Loop Scenic Drive?
Visit These Websites:

The Cascade Loop. . .Washington State’s Scenic Loop Highway

Cascade Loop Travel & Tourism

Best Of The Northwest: Seattle Visitors Guide


Photographs Courtesy of Robert Ward - Copyright 2007.

*******

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Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Add Copyright Notice To Citation


I received the following comment from Craig Manson, at GeneaBlogie, to my recent post on the proper citation for the song lyrics from "Good Vibrations" by the Beach Boys. As you may or may not know, Craig is a law professor and knows his way around a good citation.

fM,

I always recommend that the standard citation forms be supplemented with a copyright notice when large portions of copyrighted material are used. I think including the copyright notice shows that the user respects the copyright and actually may bolster the case for “fair use.” The copyright info, of course, should be in the source material. But if it's not there, then copyrights registered or renewed after 1978 can be found easily at the U.S. Copyright Office's search site.

For Good Vibrations, the copyright information is:
Copyright ©1966 & 1978, Brian Wilson and Mike Love

As to these online lyrics sites, some are better than others. Some are wildly inaccurate! So it's particularly important, as you say, to include the Web address so others can find it.

Thanks for your focus on citation issues! It's a real service to our community.

Craig Manson

This is a brilliant suggestion. With the addition of the copyright notice, the citation for the lyrics would be written:

Wilson, Brian, and Mike Love. “Good Vibrations.” Lyrics. Good Vibrations, Single. Brian Wilson, 1966. Copyright ©1966 & 1978, Brian Wilson and Mike Love. Lyrics Freak (http://www.lyricsfreak.com/b/beach+boys/
good+vibrations_20013757.html : accessed 18 October 2007).

While the addition of a copyright notice to a citation is not a silver bullet if you are in fact infringing on someone's copyright, as Craig points out, it actually may bolster the case for “fair use” when your use is in fact fair.
Thank you Craig, for adding this important advice to our discussion on citations.


Friday, October 19, 2007

"Come Blogging"

The footnoteMaven is a member of Seattle's Museum of History and Industry's Nearby History Seminar for Researchers and Writers for ten weeks this fall.

There are 15 participants writing on a myriad of subjects and formats, from journal articles, and books to documentaries.

Last week we had an extremely interesting discussion lead by Gary Luke, the publisher of Sasquatch Books.

Sasquatch Books is the publisher of books for and from the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, and California and is considered the nation's premier regional press. Sasquatch defines its region as the magnificent area that stretches from the Brooks Range to the Gulf of California and from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean.

Gary told us that when they consider an author for publication Sasquatch expects that author to "come blogging." The editors want to have a sense of who will want to read the proposed book, and to know whether or not the author has an audience. Blogs have certainly come a long way and are now considered a serious medium by publishers and a measure of an author's worth.

He went on to explain that they are looking for an author who has created a focused blog. One that sets him/her apart as a dedicated expert in the field with a loyal following.

This dovetails nicely with two articles I just read written by Lorelle on WordPress entitled Blog Struggles: The Blog Focus and Blog Struggles: Why Should Your Blog Have a Focus. Lorelle explains the reasons for focus:

-- It establishes you as an expert.
-- It creates a consistent flow of information and content.
-- The blog and you become a source for information, not just a link.
-- Increased incoming referrer links and increased likelihood of being blogged about, not just linked to.
-- Like attracts like.

The same reasons discussed by Gary Luke.

So, if you are looking to publish or be published, I suggest you take Gary's advice and "come blogging" with the help of Lorelle's very timely articles.

Hope to see you in the bookstores, and I don't mean just buying!

*******

Thursday, October 18, 2007

Ask The footnoteMaven

I received the following email from Terry Thornton of the Hill Country of Monroe County, Mississippi blog. Terry is the author of one of my favorite blogs and writes to ask some very pertinent questions regarding citing sources contained in blogs. I applaud Terry for making the effort to responsibly document the information contained in his posts.

Let's take a look at his email questions and my responses.

Dear Maven,

You wrote in your recent blog post re: Citations:

Good good good good citations
I'm pickin' up good citations
Your giving me excitations
Good good good good citations

As we all know this is a take off on the Beach Boys' great hit, Good Vibrations. If I wished to include part of their words in my blog and properly footnote them, would the following suffice?

" Ahhhhhhhh
Good good good good vibrations
(Oom bop bop)
(I'm pickin' up good vibrations)
She's giving me excitations
(Oom bop bop)
(Excitations)
Good good good good vibrations
(Oom bop bop)"

Source: Some of the lyrics from the Beach Boys, Good Vibrations, by Brian Wilson and Mike Love;Tony Asher and Van Dyke Parks, uncredited lyricists. Lyrics available online at http://www.seeklyrics.com/lyrics/Beach-Boys/Good-Vibrations.html

Terry's Question:

I know this citation does not include publisher, place of publication, nor date --- but this is the most complete citation that I could put together on short notice. Would it do for a blog citation?

footnoteMaven's Answer:

To my knowledge, there is no such thing as a blog citation, only proper citations following one of the many style manuals. There is a citation for song lyrics in a works cited document. It would adhere to the following structure.

Songwriter's last name, first name. "Title of Song." Lyrics. Title of Album. Name of Publishing Company, Year Recorded.

Thus the Beach Boys song Good Vibrations would be cited as:

Wilson, Brian, and Mike Love. “Good Vibrations.” Lyrics. Good Vibrations, Single. Brian Wilson, 1966. Lyrics Freak (http://www.lyricsfreak.com/b/beach+boys/good+vibrations_20013757.html : accessed 18 October 2007).

I added where it could be found online, as you indicated it would be posted online in your blog. This is not actually necessary to the citation in a traditional format, but the purpose of a citation is to enable the reader to find your source. Here the site information would take the reader directly to the source of the lyrics. I also linked the name Lyrics Freak to allow the reader to select the name and be taken directly to the site.


Terry's question:

And now the sixty-four dollar question: should you have cited your take-off on Good Vibrations? LOL! [In academic circles, I'd say YES, but in blogging circles, I don't know.]

footnoteMaven's Answer:

My answer would be no in either circle. It was not necessary to cite my take-off of Good Vibrations for the following reasons:

1. This was not a scholarly work.
2. It was not a direct quote.
3. I did not paraphrase – I played fast and loose.
4. The lyrics are well-know facts, easily ascertainable from many sources – no need for documentation. (Here in #4 you have proven my point. You found the lyrics quite easily with an online search.)

Your suggested use of the lyrics if posted in your blog would be a different matter. Yours wold be a direct quote and I would cite it.


Terry's Question:

This is a typical example of the quagmire I find myself in the modern world of referencing and citing. I think I'm too schooled in the traditional --- any help you can give on when to give a citation and when not to give a citation in blog articles will be most helpful.

footnoteMaven's Answer:

I am putting together posts on style types (listing and links to style guides will be included in this post), when to cite, footnotes vs. endnotes, how to cite in a non-traditional online medium, etc. Though blogs may not be the traditional medium we are familiar with, the forms of citation are still traditional.

I think your question is more easily addressed as a matter of style in online publishing, rather than grounded in traditional citation format.


*******

Thank you for your question Terry. I hope the upcoming series of posts will help you make informed decisions regarding citing your sources.

Not everyone may agree with my interpretation of the rules. Fine citing minds may disagree. Is there a definitive answer? If there is a footnoteGod, as opposed to a Maven, then perhaps we will find that definitive answer. Until then, the footnoteMaven will continue to attempt to do her best.

Note: The footnoteMaven has all of Elizabeth Shown Mills' books and QuickSheets and refers to her on a daily basis. She is the standard for all genealogists and family historians and will be discussed in the upcoming posts.

The footnoteMaven's answers are based on the The Chicago Manual of Style 15th ed. rev. (University of Chicago Press, 2003).

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Blame It On The DNA


The call for submissions for the next Carnival looks like it's going to be a real challenge. Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., The Genetic Genealogist and host of the next COG asks, "Do you have a family mystery that might be solved by DNA?"

He will analyze our posts for possible answers to questions or mysteries based on genetic genealogy and then he'll try to help us all understand if and how genetic genealogy might be used to solve our mysteries and questions.

I'm going to really have to ponder this one. I'm afraid I know enough about DNA to know that I don't know enough to ask a reasonably intelligent question.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the "I Blog The COG" badge in the upper right hand corner of this page. The deadline for submissions is November 1, 2007. Past posts and future hosts can be found on the blog carnival index page.

Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Genealogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome!

Don't miss the Carnival of Genealogy 34th Edition. Jasia performs her Halloween magic and leads us through new contributors and old favorites.

I'm only a third of the way through the submissions, but I can guarantee you it's a Carnival not to be missed.

And to all our first time contributors, ya'll come back now!

*******

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Wednesday, October 17, 2007

Good Good Good Good Citations - Steve Danko


Good good good good citations
I'm pickin' up good citations
Your giving me excitations
Good good good good citations

One of the most important jobs of the family historian is to document their sources. The true measure of a professional researcher will lie in their documentation. It is the trail of breadcrumbs followed by those who will make use of our research and a map for us to be able to return to that source of "yesteryear" without having to recreate the entire process.

The way we identify those sources is in a citation. A citation contains words, abbreviations, and numbers in a specific format that allows the reader to locate the source we have cited. A citation is a demonstration that our information is well researched and well supported.

Not all citations are created equal. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we had a drag and drop template for every source we wished to cite. We do not. There are certain basic principles of citation, once mastered, we are free to interpret them in the manner we deem appropriate.

I have spent a great deal of time reading the articles of fellow GeneaBloggers and observed the different forms of citations to sources used by each. Starting today I will award the footnoteMaven Good Citations Stamp to the GeneaBlogger whose citations meet the following three criteria:

1. Complete - no further information is needed to find the source.
2. Consistent - citation form used is consistent throughout the blog.
2. Mills Standard - the source citation closely follows the recommendations in Mills, Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., Fall 2007).

The first recipient of the footnoteMaven Good Citations Stamp is Steve Danko of Steve's Genealogy Blog. His citations are complete and consistent throughout. His citations closely follow the standard set forth by Elizabeth Shown Mills.

Here is a prime example of his citations found in the post, Adam Bonislawski in the 1910 U.S. Federal Census.

SOURCE: 1910 U.S. census, Worcester County, Massachusetts, population schedule, Worcester City, Ward 1, Precinct 2, enumeration district (ED) 1825, sheet 19-A, dwelling 205, family 433, Adam Bonislawski; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 16 October 2007); citing National Archives microfilm publication T624, roll 631.

Note: Although Steve lists this simply as "SOURCE," it is the proper citation for a Full Reference Note.

Congratulations Steve on being the first recipient of the footnoteMaven Good Citations Stamp! If you're into badges the stamp is yours to display.

*******


Do you know a GeneaBlogger with great citation habits? Email the footnoteMaven with your recommendation.

Tuesday, October 16, 2007



When The 58th Edition Of The COG Is Posted
Fact or Fiction Will Be Revealed


TheEnd

Monday, October 15, 2007

I Once Was The Great Pumpkin


It was a dark and snow stormy night. The witching hour had finally come to pass. I gazed at myself in the mirror - the "Great Pumpkin" look was me all over.

The trip in this blizzard would be a long one and I had to arrive at my destination in time for Halloween. As we drove, I hung my head out the passenger door window to help the driver follow the lines painted on the road. I couldn't see my hand in front of my face. I was developing freezer burn, but that was the least of my worries. I kept yelling "hurry" but thanks to the weather there was no hurry this Halloween.

At last, the lights of my destination appeared. I was met at the door by a woman wearing a nurse's uniform. "Great costume," I remarked. She was not amused.

"How far along is your pumpkin?" she asked. "Nine months, six days," I answered. "Is it your first pumpkin?" First and most likely last I thought. "Yes," I answered. She informed me I had probably made a mistake in calculating my pumpkin growth chart, as my pumpkin wasn't large enough to be delivered for this Halloween celebration.

"Go for a walk," she suggested. "Your pumpkin will be late for the celebration. No Halloween winner for you this year."

Walk? She wanted someone dressed as the "Great Pumpkin" to walk. How long, how far? O.k., this pumpkin was getting really heavy and it was evident I would soon be viewing it from a spot on the corridor floor.

Where did that woman dressed as a nurse go? All the doors down the corridor were closed. I started opening them, one by one, looking for the pumpkin patch.

Aha! A man dressed as a doctor was placing a recently arrived pumpkin in the patch. "I've got another one for you," I called to him. The woman in the nurse's uniform shook her head and whispered to the doctor. "Check her anyway," he ordered.

The disbelieving woman in the nurse's uniform reluctantly checked and found to her surprise that my pumpkin was well on its way. Minutes later I participated in the Halloween celebration. A new pumpkin for the patch.

"A witch or a warlock?" I asked the doctor. "A princess," he replied.

*******

My little princess was six years old before she realized that people did not come to our door on the 31st of October asking for candy because it was her birthday, but rather because it was Halloween.

It is her favorite holiday and she firmly believes that everyone should celebrate because it is her birthday after all.

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Thursday, October 11, 2007

Let's Go HOG Wild

Terry Thornton of Hill Country has done some very interesting research and given HOGS Bloggers a list of HOG words in his most recent post. Why not go whole hog and put some of those words in HOGS related books, magazines and blogs.

Books:



When Is a Pig a Hog?: A Guide to Confoundingly Related English Words
by Bernice Randall

A January Fog Will Freeze a Hog, and Other Weather Folklore by Hubert Davis

A Hog on Ice & Other Curious Expressions
by Charles Funk (Author)

Hog Music (Hardcover) by M. C. Helldorfer

The Hogs of Cold Harbor: The Civil War Saga of Private Johnny Hess, CSA (Paperback) by Richard Lee Fulgham

Magazines:



Pig Progress magazine is a platform for the exchange of up-to-date knowledge obtained from reliable HOGS sources all over the world.

Blogs:

The Pig Progress Blog contains a biting article on, well, tail biting.

All right you HOGS Bloggers, do you have any you'd like to add? Go HOG wild and submit them to the growing list of HOGS related material.

With apologies to Terry for a few more good natured "pork" ribs.

*******

Wednesday, October 10, 2007

We Were So Poor. . .

We were so poor, so the story goes, we didn't own a horse and we had to ride the pig to school uphill both ways in a snowstorm.

Some rendition of this hard times story is told in every family I know. The difference is that when my father-in-law, Lewis, tells it he has the pictures to back it up. Well, at least the picture riding the pig. As you can see, Bainville, Montana was very flat, so he didn't really travel uphill both ways to school. But from the windswept hairdos, I'd say it was a wild ride anyway.

The Twins - Bill and Lewis
and Baby Dell

They had the horse and the snow, lots of snow. And for three young boys in the middle of nowhere, they had an adventuresome life.

Elenor, Bill, Dell, Lewis

As for the pig, she had a family of her own and couldn't spend all her time entertaining the boys. Ah, women's work is never done.

Now I think this little pig's tale qualifies fM as a H.O.G.S Blog, don't you?




******

Tuesday, October 9, 2007

Bring Your Ancestors Together - At An October Genealogy Event Near You


October Is Washington State Archives Month

Seattle, Washington - Western Washington


October 2007

Wednesday 3 October
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library

Virginia & West Virginia Genealogy - Gary Zimmerman
Fiske Library at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Thursday 4 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

MAC COMPUTER INTEREST GROUP
dBug Resource Center, 9620 Stone Avenue North, Suite 202, Seattle
Meeting 7pm - 9pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 6 October
Heritage Quest Research Library

HQRL Autumn Quest, Digging in the Trenches Military Records - Jim Johnson, HQRL & Patty McNamee, NARA
Tacoma Elks Club at 1965 S. Union Ave., Tacoma
Seminar 8.15am – 3.30pm
Visit Heritage Quest Research Library for more information.

Saturday 6 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

CANADIAN INTEREST GROUP
Canadian Research Overview

SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 10.15am – 12.15pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 6 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: PENNSYLVANIA
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 6 October
Seattle Public Library Central Branch

Chinese Exclusion Records at NARA Seattle
Seattle Public Library Central Branch at 1000 4th Avenue, Seattle All-day event - lecture at 1.30pm
Visit the Seattle Public Library for more information.

Monday 8 October
Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State

Doing the One-Step in Ancestry.com - Stephanie Weiner
Stroum JCC at 3801 East Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Lecture 7pm. Admission is free for JGSWS members, $5 for nonmembers.
Visit Jewish Genealogical Society for more information.

Monday 8 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

SGS PROGRAM MEETING
A Genealogist on the Road - Dave Ault

SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 7pm – 9pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Tuesday 9 October
Tacoma-Pierce County Genealogical Society

On-line Publishing - Christina Goff
Bates Technical College at 1101 South Yakima Avenue, Tacoma
Meeting 7pm
Visit the TPCGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 10 October
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF)

Church Records - Ida McCormack
Fiske Library at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Wednesday 10 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: ILLINOIS
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Thursday 11 October
National Archives - Puget Sound Region

Brick Wall Workshop
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Time 11.30am
Come bring your brown-bag lunch and your "impossible genealogy problem" and our knowledgeable staff will brainstorm possible solutions. FREE to the public.
Visit NARA for more information.

Thursday 11 October
Washington State Historical Society

Book Signing - Discussion: Archaeology in Washington - Ruth Kirk
Washington State Historical Society, 1911 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma Signing 12noon
Visit www.northwestmuseum.org/northwestmuseum for more information

Thursday 11 October
South King County Genealogical Society

TMG Users Group
Algona-Pacific Library at 255 Ellingson Rd, Pacific
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Thursday 11 October
NARA-Seattle

Stump the Archivist
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Time 1.30pm
Visit NARA for more information.

Thursday 11 October
Eastside Genealogical Society

Brick Wall Panel
Bellevue Regional Library at 1111 110th Avenue NE, Bellevue
Meeting starts at 7pm.
Visit Eastside Genealogical Society (EGS) for more information.

Saturday 13 October
Association of Professional Genealogists

Brick Walls Are Part Of The Challenge Of Genealogy - Roundtable Discussion
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way, Seattle
5th Year Anniversary Celebration starts at 10am.
Visit APG for more information.

Saturday 13 October
NARA-Seattle

Come See What We're Saving for You: at NARA-Seattle
NARA at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Tours 10am and 2pm
Visit NARA for more information.

Saturday 13 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

COMPUTER INTEREST GROUP
GenSmarts Genealogical Research Workshop - Dave Ault and Dawn

Lake City Branch SPL, 12501 28th Ave. N.E., Seattle
Meeting 10.30am – 12.30pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 13 October
Washington State Archives

Open Research Time
Washington State Archives at 1129 Washington Street SE, Olympia
Research 9am – 1pm
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.

Tuesday 16 October
South King County Genealogical Society

Computer Interest Group
Auburn Library at 1102 Auburn Way S., Auburn
Meeting 6.30pm – 8.30pm
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 17 October
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF)

Cemeteries On-Line - David Ault
Fiske Library at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Wednesday 17 October
University of Washington

Seattle Area Archives Fair
University of Washington Suzzallo Library Espresso (Room 101)
The fair will include exhibits and personnel from the UW Libraries' Special Collections, the Museum of History and Industry, King County Archives, Seattle Municipal Archives, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle Area Archivists, National Archives and Records Administration, the Puget Sound branch of the Washington State Archives, and the UW's Student Chapter of the Society of American Archivists.
Fair 10am – 4pm
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.

Wednesday 17 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: INDIANA
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 20 October
Heritage Quest Research Library

German Research - Frank Weihs
Heritage Quest Library at 909 Main Street, Suite 5
Sumner
Class runs from 9am to 11am. Admission is $10.
Visit Heritage Quest Research Library for more information.

Saturday 20 October
South King County Genealogical Society

From Seattle to the Klondike Gold Rush - Ruth Kerr
First Baptist Church of Kent at 11420 SE 248th St., Kent
Meeting 9.30am
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Saturday 20 October
Washington State Archives

How to Research Your Historic House
Washington State Archives at 1129 Washington Street SE, Olympia Presentation 10am and 11am. (two presentations)
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.

Saturday 20 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

IRISH INTEREST GROUP
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 10.15am – 12.15pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 20 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

GERMAN INTEREST GROUP
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Monday 22 October
South King County Genealogical Society

Heritage Photo Interest Group
Auburn Fire Department at 1101 D St NE, Auburn
Meeting 6.30pm to 8.30pm
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Monday 22 October
Central Washington University

Your Personal Past: A Scrapbook, Print & Digital Photo Preservation Workshop
Hal Holmes Center at 209 N Ruby St., Ellensburg
Workshop 7pm – 9pm
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.
Or call Mari Knirck, 509-963-1642, or email knirckm@cwu.edu.

Wednesday 24 October
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF)

Washington State Genealogy Research - Gary Zimmerman
Fiske Library at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Thursday 25 October
Washington State Digital Archives

FREE Basics of Archives Workshop
Washington State Digital Archives at 960 Washington Street, Cheney
Workshop 9am – 4pm
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.

Thursday 25 October
Seattle Public Library

Resources at the National Archives
Seattle Public Library Central Branch at 1000 Fourth Ave., Seattle
Seminar 11am as part of all-day seminar
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.

Thursday 25 October
King County Archives

Open House
King County Archives at 1215 E. Fir Street (between 12th and 13th Avenues, one block north of E. Yesler Way)
Open House 12noon to 3.00pm
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.
Or call 206-296-1538, or email archives@kingcounty.gov

Saturday 27 October
Western Washington University

Open house at the Goltz-Murray Archives Building
WWU at 808 25th Street (corner of 25th and Bill McDonald), Bellingham, Bellingham
Learn about the archival resources and treasures at the Washington State Archives: Northwest Region Branch, the WWU Archives & Records Center, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Everyone is welcome to enjoy light refreshments and informal tours. Limited parking is available in Lot 33G.
Open House is 10am – 2pm
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.
Call 360-650-3125, or email state.archives@wwu.edu

Saturday 27 October
Washington State Archives

Hands on History: South Puget Sound Community College Project, Fatal Accident Cards
Washington State Archives at 1129 Washington Street SE, Olympia
Workshop starts at 10 am
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information or email jbaga@secstate.wa.gov.

Saturday 27 October
Washington State Archives

Maps as a Resource for Genealogy Research
Washington State Archives at 1129 Washington Street SE, Olympia
Workshop starts at 10 am
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information or email jbaga@secstate.wa.gov.

Saturday 27 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: WASHINGTON
WA Resource Book

SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Sunday 28 October
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: NORTH CAROLINA
Form - Research Problems

SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Monday October 29
Washington State Archives Puget Sound Region Branch

Basics of Archives Workshop - FULL
Workshop 9am – 4pm. Free Workshop.
WSA at 3000 Landerholm Circle SE, MS-N100, Bellevue
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.
Note: More lectures may be added.

Tuesday October 30
Washington State Archives Puget Sound Region Branch

Basics of Archives Workshop - FULL
Workshop 9am – 4pm. Free Workshop.
WSA at 3000 Landerholm Circle SE, MS-N100, Bellevue
Visit Washington State Archives Month for more information.
Note: More lectures may be added.

Wednesday 31 October
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF)

Preserving Documents and Photographs - Sarah Nelson
Fiske Library at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

NOVEMBER 2007

Thursday 1 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

MAC COMPUTER INTEREST GROUP
dBug Resource Center, 9620 Stone Avenue North, Suite 202, Seattle
Meeting 7pm - 9pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Thursday 1 November
South King County Genealogical Society

The Legacy Users Group
Church of Latter-Day Saints at 24419-94th Ave. So., Kent
Meeting 10.30am to 12noon
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Saturday 3 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

CANADIAN INTEREST GROUP
Canadian Research Overview - II"

SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 10.15am – 12.15pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 7 November
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF)

Military Records: War of 1812 - Karl Kumm
Fiske Library at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Wednesday 7 November
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: MISSOURI
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm – 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 10 November
Heritage Quest Research Library

More hidden treasures at HQRL - Jeanine
Heritage Quest Library at 909 Main Street, Suite 5
Sumner
Class runs from 9am to 11am. Admission is free.
Visit Heritage Quest Research Library for more information.

Monday 10 November
Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State

Creative Ways to Share and Preserve Your Family History - Steven P. Schwartz
Stroum JCC at 3801 East Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Lecture 7pm. Admission is free for JGSWS members, $5 for nonmembers.
Visit Jewish Genealogical Society for more information.

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Monday, October 8, 2007

Halloween and the Supernatural!


Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn, and caldron bubble.
Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the caldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg, and owlet's wing,—
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

The leaves have turned colors, there's a chill in the air, and down the street those little hobgoblins are just waiting. It must be Halloween and time for the Carnival of Genealogy Halloween and the Supernatural posts.

Jasia tells us that we have a lot of latitude with this edition. You may submit stories of haunted houses, ghosts, any superstitions, voodoo, stories of Halloween parties or traditions, trick or treating, good luck charms, curses.

Does a witch hang from your family tree or perhaps a dancing skeleton? How about a black cat?

Bring on your hauntings and horror stories, humorous and happy ones as well to the Carnival of Genealogy 34th Edition.

Start stirring that caldron, Jasia would like us to show'em genealogists don't just have a sense of humor, but a sense of the macabre as well!

Also, check out Jasia's post "FAQs About The Carnival of Generalogy," for all you need to know about submitting a post. First-timers always welcome!

Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using the carnival submission form or select the photo in the upper right hand corner of this page. The deadline for submissions is October 15th, 2007. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.