Thursday, August 30, 2007

Nice Through The Ages

Jasia of Creative Gene has honored me with the "Nice Matters Award." Coming from Jasia it really is an honor, as recently she has seen me at my not so nicest and still gave me the award. So thank you, Jasia.


The Nice Matters Award was created by Genevieve Olsen at Bella Enchanted.

The nice award piqued my curiosity - what has nice meant through recent time? Has the definition changed? I just received a lovely shipment of old dictionaries dating from 1913 through 1959, so I thought we'd look at how the definition of "nice" has progressed.

Nice comes from Middle English meaning stupid; Latin for nescius, ignorant; and Old French for simple. Not a good start.

1913
nice 1. Foolish. Obs. 2. Lewd. Obs. 3. Fastidious; in a derogatory sense, over dainty; finical; in a laudatory sense, refined, cultured; discriminating. 4. a Affecting coy reserve; also, modest; hence, reluctant. Obs. b Exacting; scrupulous; punctilious. 5. Demanding, or characterized by close discrimination, delicate, minute, or tactful treatment, etc.; subtle; fine. 6. Delicately sensitive or discriminative; hence, of instruments, methods, etc., minutely accurate, precise; exact. 7. a Fine. Obs. b Spare; meager. Obs. 8. Trivial. Obs. 9. Pleasing, kind, considerate, etc. Colloq.
Syn. Particular, discriminating, difficult, hypercritical, prudish, queasy.
1935
nice adj. fastidious; precise; squeamish; minutely discriminative; delicate; refined; socially agreeable; pleasing to the palate; scrupulously exact.
1942
nice Foolish or silly; unimportant; over-scrupulous; fastidious; punctilious; distinguishing minutely; made with scrupulous exactness; precise; pleasant to the senses, delicious; dainty; pleasing or agreeable in general: a modern sense.
1946
nice 1, precise; acute; as, nice judgment; 2, fine; subtle; delicate; as, nice discrimination; 3, fastidious; overparticular; 4, delicate; refined; as, to be nice in one's habits or dress; 5, delicately sensitive; carefully trained; as, nice ear for music: Colloq., 1, socially agreeable; pleasant; as, nice people; 2, pleasing to the senses; as nice taste; Obs., wicked; unrestrained; stupid; ignorant; of little consequence; unwilling.
1959
There was no nice in the Vest Pocket Dictionary for 1959. This must mean that the population in 1959 was very familiar with the definition of the word nice or it was unncessary to the language.
1985
nice 1. Pleasing and agreeable in nature; enjoyable: a nice time. 2. Having a pleasant or attractive appearance: a nice dress; a nice face. 3. Courteous and polite; considerate: a nice gesture. 4. Of good character and reputation; respectable: a nice family. 5. Characterizeddd by sometines excessive delicacy or fastidiousness, fussy. 6. Showing or marked by great precision and sensitive discernment; subtle: a nice distinction. 7. Executed with delicacy, accuracy and skill: a nice bit of craftsmanship. 8. Used as an intensive with and: nice and warm. 9. Obs. a. Wanton; profligate. b. Affectedly modest; coy.

Definitions On The Web

nice pleasant or pleasing or agreeable in nature or appearance; "what a nice fellow you are and we all thought you so nasty"- George Meredith. "nice manners"; "a nice dress"; "a nice face"; "a nice day"; "had a nice time at the party"; "the corn and tomatoes are nice today." decent: socially or conventionally correct; refined or virtuous; "from a decent family"; "a nice girl." A city in southeastern France on the Mediterranean; the leading resort on the French Riviera. nice (pronounced nyce) is a command found on UNIX and other POSIX-like operating systems such as Linux. Nice is a biscuit, made by a company called Arnott's Biscuits Holdings. The biscuit is rectangular with bumpy edges and is fairly plain, with a scattering of large sugar crystals on top.

It seems "nice" has gotten "nicer" with age (like most of us). I need to purchase a few more dictionaries to fill in the gaps (1800, 1900, 1920, 1960, 1970, 1990, 2000) to more correctly display the evolution of the word nice. Although I never need a reason to buy another book, now I'm really curious.

And as to the "Nice Matters Award," I'll leave it up to you to determine which definition most closely describes the footnoteMaven. Hint: Look at 1935 and Arnott's Biscuits.

Now, I bestow the "Nice Matters Award" on:

Bill West of West in New England
Chery Kinnick of Nordic Blue
Nikki-Ann of Nikki-Ann's Journal
Nikki of Nikki's Genealogy Journal, and
Taneya of Taneya's Genealogy Blog

The five of you may question my definition of "nice" in awarding this distinction to you, but I mean it in the "nicest" possible way.
_______________
Obs. - Obsolete
Colloq - Colloquial 1. Characteristic of or appropriate to the spoken language or to writing that seeks the effect of speech; informal. 2. Relating to conversation.

Bibliography

American Heritage Dictionary
. College edition. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1985.

Follett Vest-Pocket Webster Dictionary. Chicago: Follett Publishing Company, 1959.

New Universities Webster Dictionary. New York: The World Syndicate Publishing Co., 1937.

Webster's Home Reference Dictionary Of The English Language. Third edition. Chicago: Columbia Educational Books, Inc., 1942.

Webster's Secondary-School Dictionary. New York: American Book Company, 1913.

Winston Dictionary. College edition. Philadelphia: The John C. Winston Company, 1946.

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Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Just Because You Can Doesn't Mean You Should

In my neck of the woods my little community gets their collective nose out of joint when someone new moves in, buys a plot of land or house, and the first thing they do is build a fence.

Do they have the legal right to build a fence? Of course they do, but does it make them a good neighbor, a part of this tight knit community? I think not.

So what should the new neighbor do?

Why, tell the old timers what the plan is, ask their opinions and permission even if it isn't legally needed. Act like a member of this community. Who knows, those of us who have been hanging around here for a long time might have a better idea on how to build that fence. Since you came to us first we'll loan you our tools and pitch in.

What will have us in a rage over your fence is when you build it and then charge for a party in your backyard, only to have us arrive to find you've decorated with your neighbor's lawn furniture and my prized rhododendron. And you wonder why I went home angry?

O.K., you took down the fence. Now I can see my rhododendron from every place on the street. It's still in your backyard and it looks for all intents and purposes as if it belongs to you. I really wish you had asked my permission to replant it, but the deed is done.

Did I want to share my prized rhododendron with the world? You bet I did! That's why I planted it and nurtured it. And yes, many more people can see it from your backyard than could see it from mine, but it still belongs to me. So when the Seattle Times selects your backyard as one of the best in the Northwest, I want a sign next to my rhododendron that acknowledges whose hard work made it a prize.

Be a good neighbor!

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Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Jefferson County Genealogical Society To Host Elizabeth Shown Mills

Jefferson County Genealogical Society is planning a very special seminar for 2008, the 25th anniversary year of their organization, so mark your calendars now for Saturday, March 8th, 2008.

“Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS, FUGA, the author of such genealogical standards as Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace and Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers and Librarians as well as the historical novel, Isle of Canes, and over 500 journal and magazine articles related to family history will be our speaker.

“Cited by her colleagues as “the person who has had the most impact on family history in the post-Roots era”, Ms. Mills’ accomplishments in and contributions to the field of genealogy are too numerous to mention. But a few include being past editor of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly and a regular speaker at the NGS conferences; many TV and radio appearances; president of the Board for Certification of Genealogists and the American Society of Genealogists; and instructor at Samford University Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research.

Look for reservation forms to be available in the near future.”

Thursday, August 23, 2007

Finding That Two Hundreth Edwardian Woman In A White Dress

~ A SEMINAR ~

Dedicated To Janice Brown of Cow Hampshire



The Birthday Club - Lamoure, N.D. - 1911

I have access to a time machine, a "Way Back Machine." It's called the United States Federal Census. There's a certain sadness associated with the ability to go back in time, to view the past and future of faces in a photograph, faces frozen in time. You will understand what I mean as we share the real lives of these Edwardian women in white dresses.

I love old orphan photographs. When I first saw the Birthday Club for sale I knew I had to give it a home. So I bought it.

I was pleasantly surprised, when it arrived in the mail, to discovered that listed on the back was the date, place, and names of everyone in the photograph.

The Label

Janice Brown of Cow Hampshire had written a very clever storyline for my beautiful women in their best white dresses, "Finding That Two Hundreth Victorian Woman In A White Dress." So I decided why not write the actual story; find out what I could about these Edwardian[1] women in their white dresses surrounding their distinguished male companion. I wanted to know more about each and every one of them and I hope you will as well. Follow me as I explore Lamoure, North Dakota, through the 1900, 1910, 1920, and 1930 censuses using HeritageQuest Online only.

~ The Story ~

Once upon a time, the "Birthday Club" included one man, 13 women, 2 young girls, a female child, and a baby. The man, John Freyberger, is referred to as Chief on the label. John is wearing a uniform and a badge which, when blown up in a photo editing program, reads police.

It would appear that Chief Freyberger gave copies of the photograph to the women pictured to commemorate the occassion of the "Birthday Club," as the label says compliments from Chief John Freyberger. The date is listed as September 2, 1911. The place as Lamoure, North Dakota[2].

The photograph was taken by Benjamin Studios of Lamoure. The photographer, according to the 1920 census, was Rhoda Benjamin, who was 33 years old when she took the photograph. A female photographer, Chief Freyberger completely surrounded himself with women.


From The Card Mount

All married women are listed on the label by their husband’s name, not their own. A sign of the times I'm sure. Women listed by their Christian names are single or widows according to the relevant census records. The young girls and child are referred to by their Christian names. Our little baby is referred to simply as "Baby."

What is the "Birthday Club?"[4] Mrs. Henry Hodem is holding a bouquet of flowers. Is it her birthday? Mrs. Cris Deisem is reaching for those flowers. Is it her birthday? Perhaps we will never know this much detail, but we can take a peek at the lives of each of the people photographed by locating them in the census.

Before consulting the census I wanted to match the names in the label to the faces in the photograph by creating a key. It isn't as simple as it sounds. It appears that the names are written right to left (back row first), then left to right, then right to left, then left to right on the label. I wanted to be certain each woman pictured for the name matched the age I found for her in the census. So the key was tentative until all women had been found in the census and their age ascertained. (Even this method may not be correct as I will demonstrate.)

The Key

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Mrs. Ernest Engel is Mathilde Engel. According to the 1910 census she would be 35 years old in this photograph. She was born in Germany. She and her husband, Ernest, immigrated to the United States in 1884. Mathilde has been married to Ernest for 15 years and it is the first marriage for both.[4] She has had five children all living. They are Otto 13, Lillia 12, Ernest Jr. 10, a Daughter 6 (whose name I was unable to read), and Dorothy 4. Mathilde's husband Ernest is Lamoure's real estate agent.

In the 1920 census Ernest and Mathilde have added another member to the family, a son named Richard who is seven. The name of the daughter that couldn't be read in the 1910 census is clearly written in the 1920 census, it is LaVerne. Ernest is still selling real estate in Lamoure in 1920.

By 1930, Ernest and Mathilde have become dairy farmers and only Dorothy and Richard are living with them. Dorothy is now a clerk at the court house and Richard is listed as having no occupation, not even as working with his father.

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Mrs. Dietrich Suemper is Bessie Suemper. According to the 1910 census she would be 28 years old in the photograph. Dietrich and Bessie have a daughter Evelyn who is 4 years old and is also pictured in the photograph. They were married between 7 June 1900 (1900 census in which Dietrich is unmarried) and 2 September 1911 (date of the photograph). Using Evelyn's age they were probably married in 1906 or 1907. Dietrich is a butcher employed in Lamoure's local meat market.

In the 1900 census Dietrich was a boarder in the hotel run by Hannah Larson who is also pictured in the photograph. Bessie is not married in the 1900 census for Lamoure and we do not know her maiden name so it cannot be ascertained if she was living in Lamoure in 1900.

In 1920 little Evelyn has three siblings, Walter 7 years old, Marjorie 5 years old, and Lois 1 1/2 years old. Dietrich is no longer a butcher, but is a salesman in the general store.

By 1930 Bessie is a 47 year old widow living with two of her chilldren, Walter and Marjorie. Lois is not listed on the census. She would have been 11 or 12 years old at this time, so I have assumed Lois, like Dietrich, has died.

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Chief John Freyberger is 51 years of age in this photograph. He was born in New York and has been married for 21 years. It is his only marriage and he and his wife have no children. The 1910 census lists his occupation as a farmer who owns his own farm. John is wearing a uniform and a badge that reads Police. We can assume that sometime after the date of the census taking, John became the Chief of Police for Lamoure, or the job was not listed on the census. (Only more research may answer the question.)

John, who is pictured standing behind his wife with his hand on her chair, is a widower by the 1920 census.
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Mrs. Hannah Larson is 46 years old in this photograph. She is a widow and was a widow at the age of 34 in the 1900 census. She was born in Sweden in December of 1865 and immigrated to the United States in 1887. According to the 1910 census she owns the Ring Hotel which has 6 servants and eleven boarders.

In the 1900 census one of her boarders was Dietrich Suemper whose wife Bessie and daughter Evelyn are also pictured.

In 1920 Hannah is still operating the hotel. She has less servants, but more boarders. She has not remarried.

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Mrs. Mary Hartman

There is no widowed Mary Hartman in the 1910 census, and a page by page reading for Lamoure finds only one Mary Hartman. She is married to Henry Hartman. I am assuming this is the correct Mary Hartman. If that is the case, Henry has died some time between 22 April 1910 (date enumerated) and 2 September 1911 (date of the photograph).

Mary's age is listed as 49 and she would have been 50 in the photograph. She and Henry were married for 29 years and have had two children who are not living.

Age and women is a very interesting subject. In the 1900 census, Mary lists her age as 41, but her date of birth is listed as June of 1858 and then the year 1855 has been added. Were she born in 1855 she would have been 44 or 45 years old. At least a year or two older than Henry, but she lists her age as 41. Ten years later she lists her age as 49, when if the 1855 date is correct, she is probably 54 or 55 years old. An anomoly we have probably all encountered in our research. It is possible that Mary Hartman is 55 or 56 in the photograph.

In the 1920 census there is no widowed Mary Hartman. There are two listings for a Mary Hartman in Lamoure. One is 22 years old and one is 12 years old. It is safe to assume that neither one of these is our Mary Hartman. By 1920, Mary may have remarried, moved, or died, we do not know.

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Mrs. William Hartman - In the 1900 census Mrs. William Hartman is identified as Enid. Her age is listed as 25 and she has had three children all living. They are Earl who is 13, a son (I can not read the name) 10, and a daughter Edna who is 5. Enid’s age for this census is troubling as she would have been 11 or 12 when her son Earl was born. Fortunately, the 1900 census lists the month and year of birth for each entry. Enid is listed as having been born in December of 1870. This would make her age 29 years and 6 months by the time of the June 1900 enumeration, not 25. That age is much more realistic as Enid would have been 16 almost 17 when Earl was born.

In the 1910 census Mrs. William Hartman is listed as Erinnie and she is 40 years old. She would have been 41 years old at the time of the photograph. She and William have been married for 23 years and it is the first marriage for both. She has had six children by the 1910 census and five are living, but not all living with her. At home are Edna 15, Eveline 9, Mary 4, and Velma 15 months. Two children's names are missing from this census, Earl and the son whose name I was unable to read. As the census states that Erinnie has had six children and five are living, one of the two missing children has died. The Hartman family has taken in a lodger and William is working as a laborer for a dairyman.

1n 1920, the Hartman household has become very crowded. William and Erinnie have added one child Delila 8, and another lodger. The eldest son Earl has come home to roost and has brought his wife Nettie and Erinnie's three grandchildren, Elwin 9, Nora 7, and William 2 yrs. 8 months. Both William and his son Earl are working for Standard Oil and Erinnie's daughter Evelyn has become a nurse.

The child who has died was apparently the son whose name I was unable to read. He would have been between 10 and 20 years old at the time of his death.

By 1930 the Hartman house has gotten smaller. William and Emma (as she is identified in this census) have only Mary and Velma living with them. William now owns Lamoure's filling station. Mary is a stenographer at the Court House and Velma is a clerk at her father's filling station.

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Mrs. Cris Deisem (Anna/Annie) - The 1900 census lists Anna Diesem as 31 years of age. Chris/Christian is 51. The enumerator has listed the length of their marriage as 24, but as this would make Anna 6 when she married Chris I believe the enumerator was indicating that this was a second marriage for Chris and that they had been married for four years. The children living in the home are Clara 22, Mina 18, Florence 14, Lucy 12, Albert 4, Sydney 3 mo., and Raymond 20. This further substantiates my supposition that this is a second marriage for Chris, for if Anna was the mother of all these children she would have been 9 years old when Clara was born. Christian is a merchant and Mina is one of his sales clerks. Raymond works as a farm laborer.

In the 1910 census Anna, now Annie, is 40. Annie would have been 41 in the photograph. She and Chris have been married for 17 years. The census taker has substantiated our supposition that this is a second marriage for Chris and a first marriage for Annie by indicating M-2 for Chris and M-1 for Annie. Annie has had three children, but only two are living. Clara, Mina, Florence, Lucy, and Raymond are no longer living in the home and are not found in Lamoure in the 1910 census. Albert 14 and Dorothy 3 are listed as living at home. Missing is Sydney, whom I assume has died between 2 June 1900 (enumeration) and 18 April 1910 (enumeration). Chris still owns and works in the general store.

By the 1920 census Dorothy Diesem who is 12 years old at the time is living with William Brechlin as a boarder, along with our widowed Chief John Freyberger. Annie's son Albert is living on his own next door to his sister Dorothy and is still working as a laborer.

Where are Chris and Annie and what has happened to them? It is most likely they have died as Dorothy is only 12 years old and is living on her own. I am hoping the newspapers can shed some light on what has happened to this family.

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Mrs. Frank Farrell is Nellie Farrell. Nellie would be 49 years old in the photograph. The 1910 census tells us this is the first marriage for both Nellie and Frank and that they have had five children all living. The children are listed as Winnie a son 16 years old, Clare a son 14 years old, Mamie a daughter 12 years old, Joseph 10 years old, and Patrick 8 years old.

Nellie was born in Minnesota and she and Frank own a farm.

Here, Nellie’s story takes a bit of a bizarre turn. There appears to be another Nellie Farrell also living in Ovid Township, Lamoure, North Dakota. According to the 1900 census this Nellie was also married to a Frank Farrell, but is a widow in the 1910 census. As our Nellie was listed in the label by her husband’s name we are fairly certain she was not a widow in 1910.

The other Nellie also has children with similar names and ages. A son Clare 15 years old, a son Winsluth 14 years old, a daughter Mary 13 years old, a son Joseph 9 years old, a son William 7 years old, and a son Harold 5 years old.

Nellie and Frank were not found in the 1920 and 1930 censuses.

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Mrs. Robert Konoske is Mary Konoske. The 1910 census lists her age as 45 years old, however, the 1900 census lists her birthdate as December 1863. This would make Mary 47 years old at the time of the census, not 45, and 4 months short of 49 in the photograph.

This is the second marriage for Mary and the first for Robert. They have been married nine years. Mary has had seven children and seven are living. Her children are listed as Mary 20, Lizzie 19, Jacob 17, Martha 14, Edna 12, Robert 8, Florence 5. All the children are listed as Konoske, but it would appear that only Robert and Florence are Robert’s biological children using the fact that Robert and Mary have only been married nine years. Robert's occupation is a retired farmer.

The 1920 census finds that Robert and Mary have taken in Robert’s widowed brother John Konoske. Mary, Lizzie, and Martha are no longer living at home. We now know Mary's previous married name, as Jacob and Edna are listed as Robert’s step-children and their surname is Schneider. Robert is now a wagon maker, the occupation of his brother John in the 1910 census. John has retired and it appears Robert has taken over the Konoske wagon making business.

We find a Mary Schneider in the 1900 census. She is a widow with a farm and five children. They are Mary, Lizzie, Jacob, Martha and Edna. These are the same names listed for the children of Mary Konoske, so it is fairly safe to assume this is the same Mary.

There is no Robert Konoske living in Lamoure in 1900, but there is a John who is married with several children. It is an assumption that as John Konoske and Mary Schneider were both living in Lamoure that they knew each other and that John introduced Mary to his unmarried brother Robert.

By 1930 Mary is a widow living alone in Lamoure.

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Mrs. Cris Hartman is Carry/Carrie Hartman. She was born in Minnesota in 1864 and has been married to Chris/Christ/Christopher for 28 years. They have had one child who is living, but has not lived with them since 1900.

Cris is a retired farmer. Both Carrie and Cris are absent from the census for 1920 and 1930 in Lamoure. Perhaps they have moved to be with their missing child, as Cris is retired. I hope so!

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Mrs. Henry Hodem is Elizabeth Hodem and would be 51 years old in the photograph. Elizabeth and Henry were both born in Pennsylvania and have been married for 31 years. They have four children all living, but only Minnie 22 years old, and Florence 13 years old, remain in the home.

Elizabeth's husband Henry is the County Treasurer and their daughter Minnie works for her father as a clerk.

Sadly, by the 1920 census the lovely Elizabeth has died and Henry, now a widower, is living with his 22 year old daughter Florence. She is now a Deputy County Treasurer. Minnie is no longer in the home and could not be found living in Lamoure. Henry has taken in a 23 year old boarder named Lewis Jorgenson who is a teacher.

By 1930 Henry is an auditor for the Court House and is still living with the unmarried Florence. Florence is now a clerk for the local school.

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Mrs. John Freyberger is Corrine Freyberger. I am sure she is John's wife as he stands behind her in the photograph with his hand resting on her chair. A pose used in many photographs of the time to denote a relationship. In 1911 a man would not have placed his hand on the chair of a woman who was not his wife. Particularly an upstanding citizen such as John who had been entrusted with the safety of an entire community. Nor would he had done so knowing the act would be commemorated in a photograph.

Corrine is 45 years old in this photograph. She was born in Wisconsin in April of 1863 and has been married to John for 21 years. They have never had children.

I love how the enumerator lists none for Corrine's occupation (as he did with all these women), as if being a farmer's wife in 1911 in North Dakota wasn't a full time job. Being a farmer's wife was obviously a hard life, as discussed earlier, John's Corrine is dead by the 1920 census.

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Mrs. Tom Dawson is our mystery woman. No imformation could be found for her. A page by page reading of the 1900 - 1930 censuses for Lamoure found no Tom Dawson.

Perhaps she is visiting one of the women pictured. She sits closest to the Freybergers so she may be their guest. Again, perhaps the newspapers will shed some light on who Mrs. Tom Dawson is and whether the assumpstions I've made are correct.
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Miss Florence Hodem is the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Hodem. She is 13 years old in the photograph.

In 1920, Florence is a Deputy County Treasurer. Forence's mother has died and she is living with her father who is the County Treasurer. Her sister Minnie is no longer in the home and a boarder is now living with her family.

By 1930 Florence is a clerk for the local school and is still unmarried and living with her father.
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Miss Margaret Lorenz, like Mrs. Tom Dawson, is a mystery. There is no Lorenz family living in Lamoure from 1900 - 1930. Margaret may also be a friend or relative who has been invited to the meeting of the Birthday Club.

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Mrs. Herman Albrecht is Fridah Albrecht. According to the 1910 census she would be 29 years old in the photograph. Fridah and Herman were both born in Germany. Herman came to America in 1903 and Fridah in 1906, they have been married for three years.

In the 1910 census Herman and Fridah have one child a son named Carl. Carl is listed as being a year old and would have been two years old in the photograph. The baby in the photograph looks much younger than two, so it appears that Fridah and Herman have had another child between the 1910 census and this photograph.

Fridah's husband Herman is Lamoure's butcher and owns his own shop, but in the 1920 census Herman has become a farmer who deals in stock and grain. Fridah and Herman have added several children and one child is obvious by his absence (See Baby Albrecht Below).

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Baby Albrecht is Lena Albrecht. She would have been only a few months old in this photograph.

In the 1920 census Herman and Fridah have three daughters, Lena eight years old, Ruth 7 and Edith 3 years and four months. The baby in the photograph would be the correct age to be Lena.

Missing in the census is Lena's big brother Carl who would have been 12 years old. It appears that between 27 April 1910 and 2 June 1920, Carl has died.

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Miss Evelyn Suemper is 3 years old in the 1910 Census and would have been approximately 4 years old in the photograph. Her parents are Dietrich and Bessie Suemper.

Evelyn has three siblings by the next census and is recorded as being 12 years old on 9 January 1920. Her brother and sisters are Walter 7 years old, Marjorie 5 years old, and Lois 1 year and six months.

Evelyn’s father was originally the town butcher, but by 1920 is a salesman in the general store.

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As the enumerator, Mr. E. W. Field wrote at the end of his 1910 work in Lamoure

~Here Endeth The Enumeration~


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[1] My beautiful women in white dresses turned out to be from the Edwardian period rather than the Victorian. I hope Janice doesn't mind the lack of Victoriana. The Victorian era is commonly refered to as the period of Queen Victoria's reign between 1837 and 1901. The Edwardian period is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It succeeded the Victorian period and is sometimes extended to include the period up to the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912, the start of World War I in 1914, or even the end of the war in 1918.
[2] Lamoure is variously identified as "Lamoure" and "LaMoure." I have refered to it as it is written on the photograph - Lamoure.
[3] I am having Lamoure newspapers sent to my library through interlibrary loan. I'm hoping there will be some information about the Birthday Club and if so I will update this blog.
[4] The enumerator wrote M-1 if it was the first marriage and M-2 if it were the second and so on.

Note: LaMoure is in south eastern North Dakota and was named for Judson LaMoure, a legislator in the Dakota Territory government who later became a member of the North Dakota State Legislature. It is the only Lamoure known in the United States and perhaps the world. Lamoure was a happening place in 1911 and has retained much the same population base today as it did then.

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William Wallace - A Giant of Scottish History


On this day in 1305 William Wallace was executed in London. Wallace was charged with treason for taking up arms against the English occupation of Scotland. His death fuelled the Scots drive for independence under Robert the Bruce. (It is family myth and lore that my Campbell ancestors are somehow related to Robert the Bruce.)

THAT WILLIAM Wallace is a giant of Scottish history is beyond question. The stature of the man is such that he has grown along with his legend and in many descriptions he now stands a gargantuan 6 feet, 7 inches. His deeds, like his height, may be exaggerated but what is also beyond question is that Wallace is one of Scotland's greatest heroes. So, in the midst of all the myths, who was the real William Wallace? Read an account of his life here at the Scotsman.com.

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

DearMYRTLE's Family History Hour

DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour is always very educational; I set aside time each week to spend with her.

The 21 August 2007 genealogy podcast, however, really caught my interest. Myrt gave us the opportunity to listen to two of my favorite genealogy bloggers, Jasia of Creative Gene and Schelly of Tracing the Tribe. They discussed a topic we bloggers have all been posting about recently - “Genealogist vs. Family Historian,” What Do We Call Ourselves? They did a fantastic job of representing the genealogy blogging community as well as their individual views, giving us an extremely interesting and relevant segment of the Family History Hour podcast.

As a blogging community we correspond through email, comments, scanfest, and our blogs, but it was wonderful to actually hear the voices of two of our best. Jasia, Schelly, I love reading you both, but I really enjoyed listening to you.

Bravo DearMYRTLE! A great idea, a great hour!

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Friday, August 17, 2007

Split Personality?

Recently Jasia of Creative Gene wrote a post on Genealogist vs Family Historian, Who Are You?, following the lead of Schelly and Chris who had also discussed the subject. All the opinions shared are extremely interesting as are the comments added to Jasia's post.

After giving it some thought, I would like to give you my opinion of what I call the work I do. And it is work, hard work - a professional calling.

I am a family historian; I am the chronicler of my family history, the storyteller. That designation requires genealogical research, be it done by me or someone else. As a family historian, I research and examine the concept of social history (immigration, ethnicity, social structure, demographic changes, and history of person and place) as they impact or are the family.

I use vital records, documents, oral histories, interviews, photographs and more to analyze my specific family history.

To me a genealogist is a fact finder. Whether that fact is the name of an ancestor, the land they owned at a specific time and place, or when and where they served in the military, etc. An analysis of that ancestor's place in history and the concept of social history play no part in the findings of fact.

Facts can be told without history, history can't be told without facts.

I am also the repository for family memorabilia. As the one member of the family that has a demonstrated interest in our history, my family sends me their documents, photographs, and stories to be analyzed and added to the telling of our family history.

So, I don’t divide my title by time allotted to genealogy or history. I am a family historian. Genealogy is one of my many tools as is preservation, history, research and writing.

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Wednesday, August 15, 2007

Thinking Ouside The Genealogy Conference/Workshop

I started researching my family history four short years ago. Like most people who jump into the deep end of family history research, I thought I would be finished in the first year and give each member of my family and my husband's family a published history for Christmas.

I wanted my family history to be a professional research project, so I decided to educate myself regarding everything associated with genealogy and family history. I did a little digging and was fortunate to find the University of Washington Extension, Certificate Program in Genealogy and Family History.

It's a nine month in depth program that requires a very large commitment in time and effort. Take a look at the courses. One of my classmates has said the program was more arduous then her Master's Thesis. She meant that as a compliment.

The program was taught by a Pacific Northwest professional genealogist, the Historian for the Museum of History and Industry, and many guest speakers. My instructors were brilliant. I cannot say enough good things about them or the program.

It did, however, spoil me for any workshop or conference I have since taken. My major disappointment with conferences and workshops offered on the local, regional and state level is that they don't identify the level of expertise the class is geared to, such as beginner, intermediate or advanced. I am continually disappointed after paying $50-$60 and taking the time to attend only to find the workshop geared to the beginning genealogist. I know societies use these classes to encourage new members, but I wish they would consider the segment of their membership who would like an advanced offering or subject.

Because of this I have stopped attending most of the genealogy workshops and conferences in my area and have branched out to workshops or classes that will augment my research and writing skills and the proficiency in the tools needed to accomplish the work, but that are not geared to genealogy.

I've registered for a writer's workshop this fall where your work is critiqued by other writers, mostly in the area of local history.

I took an oral history workshop for professional historians.

I've taken an Adobe and Microsoft Word workshop at the University to help me become proficient with their programs.

I registered for a memoir writing workshop and a documentary workshop.

I recently had a digital camera workshop that focused on my Canon D20.

I've taken several classes at my local Apple store to learn to record on my iPod (oral history), use iMovie, iDVD, and to learn to podcast.

I've also registered for a FileMaker and Final Cut Express class.

The Seattle Public Library offers an advance class in evidence analysis for research that I've been looking into.

And, I took a framing and matting class so that I could put all those family photos to good use.

All of these are invaluable to my passion for genealogy and my family history research, but are not specifically genealogy classes.

Don't get me wrong I still check the monthly lists from the local societies and if there is something specific I have an interest in, I will attend.

Oh, and that family history I was going to complete by Christmas four years ago - please let me live long enough to finish!

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Friday, August 10, 2007

Eight Things You Don't Really Need To Know About Me

But I'm going to tell you anyway!

One of my favorite bloggers, Janice Brown of Cow Hampshire was tagged for a Meme in which she had to disclose eight things we don't know about her. She left the tagging up to any of her readers who'd like to post.

I commented on the fact that there were some similarities in our background and she responded that she hoped I'd post. I need so little encouragement!

O.K. Janice, here are eight things most of the world does not know about me and it's a good thing I don't use my real name.

1. My real name is not footnoteMaven, I let that slip already didn't I? If you squint your eyes just right I look exactly like my picture. The name footnoteMaven came from a classmate whose footnotes I was constantly correcting. I have been the footnoteMaven ever since.

2. One of my first jobs was taking fingerprints for the FBI at a military facility whose name and location I cannot disclose. Very interesting work! I got to hold hands with a lot of men. I’d really like to see the high tech version used today.

3. I was invited to compete in the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles in the trap and skeet competitions. I couldn’t find a sponsor willing to put up the money for a woman in the shooting sports (men got it all then and still do for the most part). I couldn’t afford the price of competition (an estimated $40,000 in 1984), so I watched it on television with the rest of the world.

4. I once shot trap with Robert Stack (Elliott Ness). He was very handsome, very tall, and a terrific shot.

5. I studied the EEU (European Economic Union as it was called then) at Cambridge University in England. I was at Trinity College, Prince Charles’ school. He never showed up while I was there; the Porter did let me into his old room – very spare. Diana visited our school landing in a field next to our classroom in a helicopter. We all hung out the windows and waved.

6. I love the sound of bagpipes in the morning. My husband says they sound like someone strangling a cat. And he’s a Scot! I can not go as far as haggis.

7. My friends and family think I'm an earthquake magnet as earthquakes have followed me to every state where I have lived. Right after I arrive they have a big earthquake, usually the biggest in the history of the state. It must be my magnetic personality.

8. In high school I wanted to be an archeologist or an attorney. My father assured me everything that could be dug up had been dug up. Then they found King Tutankhamen’s tomb and the Qin terra-cotta warriors and horses. He suggested that I learn to type because I might need to make a living. Typing has always come in handy and did feed me in the early years. I still dig things up at every opportunity. Just not the same kind of dirt.

MOHAI Writers' Seminar

Seattle's Museum of History & Industry has offered the Nearby History program for nine years, helping researchers and writers, working on "nearby" projects. "Nearby" means personal, not just close to home.

I was very fortunate to have taken this seminar to work on a family history project and I can say that the people I met and the education I received were invaluable.

Each fall, the Museum offers a writers' seminar on ten successive Sunday afternoons, in which fifteen writers work together on their projects, sharing their drafts. This year the program will run from October 7 through December 9, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

I enjoyed the program so much, I have signed up for this fall's program. The program is stimulating, warm and encouraging. This year, writers are working on biography and history topics in New Hampshire, New York City, Seattle and Minnesota, as well as elsewhere.

The museum had a full class with a waiting list three weeks ago, but now two fine writers have had to drop out. Participation in the seminar is limited to writers who have either taken the museum's introduction to Nearby History or who have completed the UW Family History program.

If you would like to write this fall and would like more information,
please contact Lorraine McConaghy at lorraine.mcconaghy@seattlehistory.org.

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Thursday, August 9, 2007

Pacific Northwest Historians Guild 2008 Conference: Special Call To Genealogists and Family Historians

Pacific Northwest Historians Guild Conference, 2008

The 2008 Guild Conference will have as its theme the Civil War in the Pacific Northwest, and will take place on Saturday, March 1, 2008 at Seattle's Museum of History & Industry. Visit the Guild website for the general call for presentations.

The Program Committee is issuing a special call to genealogists and family historians for presentations on Civil War family history, with a link to the Pacific Northwest. It is difficult to stipulate what such links might be. The connection may be as simple as that shortly after an east coast Civil War experience, a veteran migrated to Oregon, Washington, Idaho or British Columbia. Or that an ancestor was assisted by the Freedman's Bureau. Or that the individual or family lived in the PNW during the Civil War, in town, on a reservation, on a homestead or at the goldfields.

The Committee's hope is that there will be enough family history presentations to comprise a session, and that from now on, each Guild conference will feature such a session.

The Guild encourages submissions from a wide variety of presenters; Guild audiences include journalists, educators, historians, historical society members, students and people with a history interest. Proposals should include a title, presenter contact information, brief presenter biography, and a paragraph describing the presentation. Submissions should be postmarked by October 1, 2007, and mailed to Lorraine McConaghy.

Museum of History & Industry
2700 24th Avenue East
Seattle, WA 98112

For more information, contact Lorraine McConaghy, Program Chair, at
lorraine.mcconaghy@seattlehistory.org, or phone 206/324-1685 x23.

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Saturday, August 4, 2007

Bring Your Ancestors Together - At An August or September Genealogical Event

The Birthday Club - Lamoure, N.D. - 1911

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Seattle, Washington - Western Washington

August 2007


Wednesday 1 August
South King County Genealogical Society

Out to Lunch Bunch
Wild Wheat Bakery at 202 1st Avenue So., Kent, WA. 1:00 p.m.
Everyone is welcome to join this group.
For additional information please check the WA-SKGS-L mailing list.
Please e-mail jeanfish@netsplash.com or call Jean Fisher at 425-413-6953 if have any questions.
Please let Betty Jasbec know if you plan to come. We need to let the restaurant know how many to plan for. E-mail blj938@aol.com or call Betty at 253-631-0640.
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Thursday 2 August
NARA

Resources for Family and Community History
NARA-Pacific Alaska Region at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Basic organization and location of records for anyone "climbing their family tree" or researching an entire community. Addresses the different types of records you should be looking for, where to find them, and sound research principles to help you stay on track.
Class runs from 10am to 12.30pm. Admission is $10.
Visit NARA's Pacific Alaska Region for more information.

Saturday 4 August
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: PENNSYLVANIA
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm - 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 4 August
South King County Genealogical Society

Waneta Bosshart Memorial Lecture at First Baptist Church of Kent, 11420 SE 248th St, Kent
The Genealogy's Complete: Now What? Mining Basic Genealogical Sources to Expand it into a Family History: A Case Study - Harold E. Hinds, Jr., Ph.D.
Lecture 1pm
If you plan to attend this free lecture please email Lecture (lecture at skcgs•org) Subject: Lecture; in the body include your name and if more than one person indicate the number.
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 8 August
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: KANSAS
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 7pm - 9pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Thursday 9 August
Eastside Genealogical Society

“Finding Your Local Ancestors” - Mike Saunders, Washington State Archives Puget Sound Region
Bellevue Regional Library at 1111 110th Avenue NE, Bellevue
Meeting runs from 7pm. Supply table opens at 6.30pm.
Visit Eastside Genealogical Society for more information.

Saturday 11 August
Heritage Quest Research Library

Scanning photos - David Grimm
Heritage Quest Library at 909 Main Street, Suite 5
Sumner, WA 98390.
Class runs from 9am to 11am. Admission is $10.
Visit Heritage Quest Research Library for more information.

Saturday 11 August
Association of Professional Genealogists

North Olympia Peninsula Genealogical Treasures - Lesa Barnes
NARA-Pacific Alaska Region at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle

Meeting starts at 10am
Visit the APG Website for more information.

Saturday 11 August
Seattle Genealogical Society

Lake City Branch of the Seattle Public Library, 12501 28th Ave. N.E., Seattle
COMPUTER INTEREST GROUP - "Newspapers Online Workshop” - Karl Kumm.
The CIG meets in the conference room at the north end of the library, which is wheelchair accessible. Free parking is available in their underground garage or on the street.
Meeting is 10.30am – 12.30pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Sunday 12 August
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: NORTH CAROLINA
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm - 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 15 August
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: MISSOURI
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm - 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 18 August
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: CONNECTICUT
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 10.15pm – 12.15pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 18 August
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: MASSACHUSETTS
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm - 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Tuesday 21 August
South King County Genealogical Society

Computer Interest Group.
Auburn Library at 1102 Auburn Way S., Auburn
Meeting 6.30pm to 8.30pm
Note SUMMER meeting.
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 22 August
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: OHIO
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm - 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 25 August
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: WASHINGTON
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm - 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Monday 27 August
South King County Genealogical Society

Heritage Photo Interest Group
Auburn Fire Department at 1101 D St NE, Auburn
Meeting 6.30pm to 8.30pm
Everyone welcome to join us
Note SUMMER meeting.
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

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September 2007


Tuesday 4 September
South King County Genealogical Society

Board Meeting
Greater Kent Historical Society (Bereiter House) at 855 E Smith Street, Kent
Meeting from 7pm - 9pm
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Wednesday 5 September
South King County Genealogical Society

Out to Lunch Bunch
Mitzels at 22244 8th So., Kent
Lunch 1:00 p.m.
Everyone is welcome to join this group.
For additional information please check the WA-SKGS-L mailing list.
Please e-mail jeanfish@netsplash.com or call Jean Fisher at 425-413-6953 if have any questions.
Please let Betty Jasbec know if you plan to come. We need to let the restaurant know how many to plan for. E-mail blj938@aol.com or call Betty at 253-631-0640.
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Thursday 6 September
South King County Genealogical Society

The Legacy Users Group
Church of Latter-Day Saints at 24419-94th Ave. So., Kent
Meeting from 10.30am - 12 noon
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Saturday 8 September
NARA

Finding Hidden Clues in Your Family Photographs
NARA-Pacific Alaska Region at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Bring your own photos with you and learn to analyze them for historical, family and other research purposes. There will also be a section on finding family photos published online.
Class runs from 10am to 12.30pm. Admission is $10.
Visit NARA's Pacific Alaska Region for more information.

Saturday 8 September
Seattle Genealogical Society

Lake City Branch of the Seattle Public Library, 12501 28th Ave. N.E., Seattle
COMPUTER INTEREST GROUP - TBA.
The CIG meets in the conference room at the north end of the library, which is wheelchair accessible. Free parking is available in their underground garage or on the street.
Meeting is 10.30am – 12.30pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Saturday 8 September
NARA

Citing Primary Sources
NARA-Pacific Alaska Region at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
An overview of ways to record sources, why you need to document and a presentation of the best manuals and articles online. Additionally, some of the problems in documentation will be presented with possible solutions.
Class runs from 1.30pm to 4pm. Admission is $10.
Visit NARA's Pacific Alaska Region for more information.

Monday September 10
Jewish Genealogical Society

TBA
Stroum JCC at 3801 East Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Lecture 7pm. Admission is free for JGSWS members, $5 for nonmembers.
Visit Jewish Genealogical Society for more information.

Monday 10 September
Seattle Genealogical Society

SGS PROGRAM MEETING - Location to be announced.
SGS is pleased to present Friedrich Wragge from Reinbek near Hamburg, Germany. He will give a Power Point presentation (in English) on the Ortfamilienbuch (OFB) Berne, this is the family lineage book of a church community. The dates of entries in the birth, marriage and death registers of the church books spans a time period form 1641/1659 to 1900. These Berne books contain 2596 pages and lists 15459 families and 44029 persons. If you have any German ancestry this will be your opportunity to learn about a wonderful resource for genealogical information. All are welcome.
Meeting is 7pm – 9pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Monday 12 September
Seattle Genealogical Society

STATE FOCUS GROUP: MARYLAND
SGS Library at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle
Meeting 1pm - 3pm
Visit the SGS Website for more information.

Monday 12 September
Tacoma-Pierce County Genealogical Society

Annual Show and Tell ~ Genealogical Discoveries This Summer
Olympic Room - Tacoma Public Library at 1102 Tacoma Avenue South, Tacoma
Meeting 6.45pm - 8.30pm. Social "cookies & coffee" time which begins at 6.30pm
Visit the TPCGS Website for more information.

Thursday 13 September
South King County Genealogical Society

TMG Users Group
Algona-Pacific Library at 255 Ellingson Rd, Pacific
Meeting from 1pm - 3pm
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Thursday 13 September
South King County Genealogical Society

General Meeting
First Baptist Church of Kent at 11420 SE 248th St, Kent
Meeting topic: "Sharing" In this open forum meeting members are invited to share their summer experiences.
Meeting 9.30am - 12noon. Coffee & cookies at 9.30am meeting at 10am
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Saturday 15 September
Heritage Quest Research Library

Passage Express - Jim Johnson
Heritage Quest Library at 909 Main Street, Suite 5
Sumner, WA 98390.
Class runs from 9am to 11am. Admission is $10.
Visit Heritage Quest Research Library for more information.

Tuesday 18 September
South King County Genealogical Society

Computer Interest Group.
Auburn Library at 1102 Auburn Way S., Auburn
Meeting 6.30pm to 8.30pm
Note SUMMER meeting.
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Monday 24 September
South King County Genealogical Society

Heritage Photo Interest Group
Auburn Fire Department at 1101 D St NE, Auburn
Meeting 6.30pm to 8.30pm
Everyone welcome to join us
Visit the SKCGS Website for more information.

Saturday 29 September
Seattle Genealogical Society

2007 SGS FALL SEMINAR - "Henry Z. 'Hank' Jones"
Lake City Elks Club, 14540 Bothell Way N.E., Lake Forest Park, Washington.
$40 ($50 SGS nonmembers - extra $10 applicable to membership)
More information and a printable registration form here.
Lecture 8.15am - 4.30pm

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Thursday, August 2, 2007

29th Edition Of The Carnival Of Genealogy!

Welcome to the August 1, 2007, Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy and thank you to Jasia of Creative Gene for allowing me the opportunity to host this COG edition.

The topic for the 29th Edition Of The Carnival is Moral or Legal Dilemmas in Genealogy and Genea-blogging. Which ones have you had to deal with and how did you resolve them, if you did? There seems to be a common thread to many of the contributions for this COG - our ancestors were all way too human. So join me on this edition's ride and see if we can find a road map for those moral and legal dilemmas!

First up is Laura Young of the Dragon Slayer's Guide To Life (don't you just love the name). She writes a beautiful post entitled On Legacy and asks the question, "If my niece one day Googles me twenty years from now, if Googling still exists, and stumbles on me here, will she want to make a cup of tea, and light some incense and read this?" How could she not, Laura? Thank you.

Next, Everyone's Friend in Genealogy, Dear Myrtle, presents a response to a reader's question on Genealogy Etiquette posted at DearMYRTLE. Thanks, Myrt, for your best Sgt. Joe Friday advice, advice we should all heed.

Jessica Oswalt writes regarding an issue near and dear to the footnoteMaven's heart, sources and their proper citation in Ethical Issues in Genealogy that I have come across posted at Jessica's Genejournal. Thanks, Jessica, we all understand your frustration with incomplete research.

Next, Janice Brown presents Genealogy: Preventing Internet Theft of your Family Photos posted at Cow Hampshire. Janice answers the question "But who in the world would want to use my old photographs?" and gives us a lesson in the fine art of watermarking. If you want to save your cherished family photos from online theft this is a post not to miss. Thanks Janice for sharing your expertise.

Larry Lehmer cooks up a dilemma in What should you include in your 'family stew?' posted at Passing It On. Does that new "secret spice" alter the old family recipe? Thanks Larry, a little food for thought goes a long way!

Next, John Newmark presents How much to say about the reason Relative A stopped speaking to Relative B posted at TransylvanianDutch. Thanks for discussing a real life, all too human dilemma, John. A dilemma that carries over to the post itself.

Craig Manson writes What do I Do Now? Moral Dilemmas in Genealogy posted at GeneaBlogie. Those of you who have followed Craig’s summer odyssey may wonder out loud where Craig got the time or energy to submit such a thorough article to the COG. I certainly did. Craig discusses secrets, confidentiality, and an obligation to set the record straight. Thanks Craig, for a great post and for making time for the COG. Safe trip home!

Everyone’s favorite genea-blogger, Jasia, writes another terrific article entitled Include? Omit? Justify? Defile? Do Time? posted at Creative Gene. The names have been changed to protect the innocent or not so innocent as the case may be, but we all recognize the dilemma. Jasia presents us with her conflicted thoughts and feelings on the subject of an all too human ancestor. The title says it all. Thanks, Jasia!

Next, Lori Thornton presents Moral & Ethical Dilemmas in Genealogy posted at Smoky Mountain Family Historian. Thanks Lori, for sharing the frustration of seeing someone else take credit for your hard earned work and for discussing genealogical education versus turning over researched information. The fact that you use proper citations warms the footnoteMaven's heart.

Randy Seaver writes about A Challenging Moral Dilemma posted at Genea-Musings. As always, Randy gives us a crowd pleaser post that discusses nibbling around the edges of an extremely personal dilemma. Thanks Randy, we all hope you get that telephone call or email.

Next, Steve Danko presents his views on Ethics in Publishing Family Histories posted at Steve's Genealogy Blog. What, you can’t copyright facts? Of course not! Which only leads Steve to more dilemmas.

Ken Spangler posts an article entitled Publish Or Withhold, What To Do? at Beyond Fiction. Ken is searching for a break through in his dilemma. He wants to tell the whole story but can he really do that? Is it a legal or a moral issue, or just a judgment call? Who decides? Thanks Ken for a very interesting article with some great questions.

Next, Becky Wiseman submits a well written post entitled There are no easy answers at kinexxions. It’s uncommon knowledge versus common sense in recording, publishing, sharing, correcting and acknowledging family information. Well done Becky, and thanks.

Bill West asks the question “Do I really want to know everything?” in his submission entitled MY DILEMMA posted at West in New England. Bill takes an in-depth look at all the options and ramifications to answering this question. Thanks Bill, this is a really tough question that hits home for every family historian.

Rounding out the submissions is the footnoteMaven’s own dilemma in To Post or Not To Post :: That Is The Question at the footnoteMaven. Come work through my thought process as I decided whether to post an old family photo sans copyright.

That concludes this edition of the Carnival of Genealogy. I hope you enjoyed it; it certainly gave me a lot to think about!

And now it's time for the Call for Submissions! The topic for the 30th Edition (can it be thirty already) of the Carnival of Genealogy will be: Genealogical Conferences/Seminars. Just to get you thinking, here are some things you might want to write about. Have you been to a conference you really enjoyed? Is there one you attend every year? Which would you recommend to others and why? Is there one you've always wanted to attend but couldn't? If you could design the "dream conference", what sessions would you have in it? Have you been on a genealogy cruise? What are your pet peeves regarding genealogy conferences? Those ideas should be good for a blog post or two but don't feel limited to them. If you've got something else to say on the subject, let's hear it! The next edition will be hosted by Jasia at Creative Gene and the deadline for submissions will be August 15th.


Share your Conference/Seminar experiences with us and submit your blog article to the next edition of the Carnival of Genealogy using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

Your hostess for this edition of the COG would like to take this opportunity to thank Jasia of Creative Gene for doing a fantastic job on publishing this COG. As I can attest, she devotes a great deal of time and effort to making us a true community of genea-bloggers. Thank you Jasia, we couldn't do it without you!

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