Sunday, April 29, 2007

One Day Blog Silence - April 30 2007


One Day Blog Silence

Thursday, April 26, 2007

Welcome Four New Blocks To The Genealogy Bloggers Quilt

Today I welcome four new blocks to the Genealogy Bloggers Quilt. They represent some excellent genealogy blogs. Take a moment to visit, you never know what wonderful information they have gathered that may be of use to you in your search for your ancestors.

Taneya's Genealogy Blog
Nikki's Genealogy Journal
The Accidental Genealogist
A Somerset Family History

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Sunday, April 22, 2007

Today Is The footnoteMaven's Birthday!

Originally, this day was all mine. Today, I share April 22nd with the Earth. In 1970, Earth Day was established in the United States to increase public awareness of the Earth's environmental problems.

I also share my birthday with Jack Nicholson, who is much older than I.

The month of April has seen its tragedies, the San Francisco earthquake and the sinking of the Titanic. Unfortunately, two tragedies of recent history have been added to April's time line - Columbine and Virginia Tech. April will never hold the same meaning for the victims of those tragedies.

I am going to celebrate my birthday by attending a lecture at the Seattle Central Public Library on 'Burton Holmes Travelogues.' The author, Genoa Caldwell will present an illustrated lecture based on her book, "Burton Holmes Travelogues: The Greatest Traveler of His Time, 1892-1952."

My grandfather was Burton Holmes' film editor and stereoptician. Holmes' lectured at Carnegie Hall over 400 times and took Edward Jesse Greene with him to show the slides of his travels. Greene met Louis Salter (my great grandfather and the Superintendent of Carnegie Hall) and was introduced to Salter's only child Lillian. They fell in love and the rest is ancestors and the reason I am celebrating my birthday today.

April will always be remembered by me for its beautiful flowers. One of our fellow bloggers, Nikki-Ann, has been capturing these April beauties. Drop by her blog and take a look, she certainly does April justice.

And a thank you to my parents for not naming me April as they had originally intended. It just wouldn't have been me, I really am much more like the song Dad sang to me as a child, the song you named me after.

"When I go to sleep, I never count sheep, I count all the charms about footnoteMaven."

Sunday, April 15, 2007

Titanic - Washington State Connections


Image courtesy of RMS Titanic, Inc.


Two passengers are listed on the Titanic as being residents of Washington State, with 13 passengers listing their destination as Washington and one of the survivors who settled here as being buried in Washington.

Mr Johan Werner Salonen

Mr Johan Werner Salonen, 39, boarded the Titanic in Southampton. He was travelling to Aberdeen, Washington with Manta Nieminen. Johan Salonen had paid 553 Fmk ($106/£21 16s) for his ticket including train to Aberdeen.

Mr Salonen's body was never found, £50 in compensation was paid to his relatives.

References
Claes-Göran Wetterholm (1988, 1996, 1999) Titanic. Prisma, Stockholm. ISBN 91 518 3644 0

Acknowledgements
Leif Snellman, Finland

Mr Hugh Roscoe Rood

Mr Hugh Roscoe Rood was born on 23rg April 1873.

Rood and his wife made their home in Seattle, where he was vice president of the Pacific Creosotin Company.

They were in Paris when Mr Rood booked a single passage on the Titanic for a business trip to Nw York. Mrs Rood and her maid were to follow on another vessel. Rood boarded the Titanic at Southampton as a first class passenger (ticket number 113767, £50), he occupied cabin A-32.

He died in the sinking. His body, if recovered, was never identified.

After the disaster, Mrs. Rood tried in vain to find any survivors who recalled seeing her husband on board the Titanic.

References and Sources

Contract Ticket List, White Star Line 1912 (National Archives, New York; NRAN-21-SDNYCIVCAS-55[279])
Hermann Söldner (ed.) (2000) RMS Titanic: Passenger and Crew List 10 April 1912-15 April 1912. ä wie Ärger Verlag.

The entire list can be viewed at Encyclopedia Titanica.

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Findmypast.com has the images of the Titanic passenger lists online, free of charge, for a limited time. There are 27 pages of images for Southampton and 7 pages for Queenstown. These images are from the National Archives UK.

Registration is required. Images can be saved to your hard drive or printed.

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And if you're in my neck of the woods:

On April 14, 2007 – 95 years to the day the Titanic struck the iceberg that sent it to the ocean floor – the Royal BC Museum launches a six-month presentation of Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition. April 14 to October 14, 2007.

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Buried No Longer

The following is my contribution to the 21st Edition of the Carnival of Genealogy - The Carousel. The story was written as a submission to a writing contest and will be used as the Introduction to my Salter family history.


I was a strange little girl. I know it would be more dignified to say I was unique or perhaps even unusual, but the plain truth is I was strange. The strangeness, as my family viewed it, lay in my favorite childhood pastimes; collecting “important papers,” digging for buried treasure, and reading.


footnoteMaven and her little sister bibLio
They have twin brothers - citaTion and endNote


I didn’t just enjoy reading; I was compulsive about reading and about books in general. I still am. I would like to thank my parents for my love of reading, but it was really the result of both nature and necessity. My parents didn’t buy a television until I was twelve, so as a child I spent my spare time reading the books my Mother kept on the shelves at home. She loved to read and there were many books. Gone With The Wind, I read it twenty times. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, I read it seven times.

Treasure Island was probably the inspiration for one of my other favorite pastimes, digging for buried treasure. When I was a little girl I woke up every morning with the certainty that today would be the day I would find a treasure chest filled with rubies, diamonds, and emeralds somewhere on the five acres my parents owned in rural Missouri. My mother continually reminded me that pirates were not known to have buried treasure in southeastern Missouri, but I knew she was wrong, and so I dug. Digging only lasted a year, by this time there wasn’t a piece of the property that hadn’t felt the shovel and my parents tired of the yard looking as if it had been inhabited by a drunken mole.

I transferred my hunt for treasure to collecting “important papers,” really just another type of treasure. Now what is an “important paper” you ask? To this child, it was something my parents received in the mail and for some reason unbeknownst to me, threw it in the trash. I now was digging in the trash to retrieve “important papers.” Mother, fearing my digging in the trash would rival the holes in her yard, gave up and turned over all “important papers” to me as they arrived in the mail. “Junk,” my Mother would repeat each time she handed me a stack of envelops. Not junk to me, I cherished, alphabetized, and kept each piece with its envelope never losing a single “important paper.”[1]

Reading, digging, collecting “important papers,” I didn’t know then, but have since come to realize, are some of the necessary traits of a family historian. These traits have stood me well in my pursuit of the history of my family.

It was the summer of 1964, and I was about to be introduced to the treasure of a lifetime. Our family traveled by car from southeastern Missouri to New York City for the World’s Fair. My grandmother was charged with the running of the Lutheran Pavilion and my parents thought the fair would be an excellent learning experience for their four children. I enjoyed the Fair, but my Grandmother’s attic held a far greater attraction for me and I was soon digging in the dusty books I found there.



Louis Salter

In a book written about Carnegie Hall, I found a paragraph that read; “Mr. Totten showed us an autograph book belonging to Louis Salter, worth a king’s ransom.”[2] Louis Salter was my great grandfather who had been the Superintendent of Carnegie Hall, and he had a real life treasure! That feeling of certainty I had experienced as a child digging in the yard came over me. The treasure was within reach.

I wanted to start the hunt immediately, but our time in New York was short and Mother and Grandmother wanted us to see Manhattan and their beloved Carnegie Hall. Grandmother agreed to take us into the City on the subway and give us a tour. I wish I had paid more attention to her tour of Carnegie Hall, filled with wonderful memories. She knew it well; she had learned to roller-skate in the stately Hall. She and her mother and father had lived in Carnegie Hall. I wish I had asked her the questions that come to me as I sit at my computer writing our family history. Questions no one is alive to answer. The summer for treasure hunting had come and gone, we returned to Missouri.

Somehow, as an adult, life gets in the way of treasure hunts. It’s not that you have outgrown them, just that you have grown up responsibilities. Years later, when I thought of it again, I called my mother and asked about the treasure. She told me she thought it was somewhere in a box in her garage in Florida. Treasure still held no interest for her.

It wasn’t until she died and left the “important papers,” books, and photographs to me that I started the treasure hunt again in earnest. It has taken several years of digging in books, libraries, people’s memories, and Carnegie Hall and the New York Philharmonic archives to unearth the treasure, Louis Salter’s treasure.

No, it wasn’t the rubies, diamonds, or emeralds of the treasure hunts of my youth. It wasn’t even a king’s ransom in today’s money. The autograph book, valued at around $15,000, and containing the signatures of many presidents, has been donated to Carnegie Hall and is exhibited in the Rose Museum.

But that was not what was truly valuable. The treasure, I soon found, was Louis Salter himself. The story of his life as it played out in a young New York City, his contribution to the history of a famous Music Hall, his job with the Philharmonic Society, and his epic voyage with Toscanini and the Philharmonic to Europe, each of these a treasure, a family treasure.

My family history is the result of that treasure hunt; my family treasures, buried no longer.



Toscanini & The New York Philharmonic
European Tour


___________________
[1] I have not included the “important papers” taken by my baby sister, as having been lost. They were stolen and she knows it.
[2] Ethel Peyser, The House That Music Built: Carnegie Hall (New York: Robert M. McBride & Company, 1936), 165.

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Wednesday, April 11, 2007

Pacific Northwest History Conference 2007 April 19 - 21

Recently, Miriam of AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors Blog, did a post in which she said "The lists of workshops, interest groups, and computer classes that are available on the west side of the Cascades for the genealogical community is enviable!"

It's true. As a genealogist and family historian in the Seattle area, I will acknowledge we have an embarassment of riches. There is so much offered here. The following conference is another winner if you are working on an oral history project, as I am. Oh, and take a look at Miriam's blog. She does a fantastic job and is one of Washington's own - giving us one more thing of which to be proud!

Pacific Northwest History Conference 2007
Land of Destiny: Promise and Reality in Pacific Northwest History
Union Station

60th Annual Pacific Northwest History Conference
in conjunction with the annual meeting of the
Northwest Oral History Association
April 19-21, 2007
La Quinta Hotel
1425 E. 27th St., Tacoma, Washington

Download the complete program in PDF format at the Conference website.

For the 60th time, historians, scholars from related fields, teachers, students, history enthusiasts, and the general public gather at the Pacific Northwest History Conference and the associated meeting of the Northwest Oral History Association to consider interpretations of the region’s past.

Of particular interest to family historians is the Thursday, April 19 - Workshop:

Telling Stories, Practicing Oral History
9:00am – 4:30pm (with break for lunch)

Kathy Hodges, Idaho Oral Historian, will offer a full day of introductory training for interviewers and community historians wishing to learn more about the practice of oral history. The workshop will cover setting up a project, publicity, finding narrators, legal aspects of oral history, interviewing techniques, equipment, transcribing, and archiving the final result. The registration fee is $50. Included in the fee are hand-outs, a one-year membership in NOHA (value $15), and a copy of A Field Notebook for Oral History, 4th edition, published by the Idaho Oral History Center (value $8).

Permanent Sponsor
Washington State Historical Society

Co-Sponsors
Northwest Oral History Association
Ninth Judicial Circuit Historical Society

Program Committee
Chair, Michael Allen, University of Washington, Tacoma
Katrine Barber, Portland State University & Center for Columbia River History
Sharon Boswell, Washington State Oral History Program
Terrence Cole, University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Anne Kilgannon, Washington State Oral History Program
Beth Kraig, Pacific Lutheran University
Kevin Marsh, Idaho State University
Liping Zhu, Eastern Washington University
Lauren Danner, Washington State Historical Society

Download the complete program in PDF format at the Conference website.

Saturday, April 7, 2007

Bring Your Family Together - At An April Genealogy Event Near You

April_FindYourFamily
Nebraska State Historical Society Photograph Collections [RG2301-PH-0-8c]

Thursday 5 April
MAC Computer Interest Group
dBug Resource Center, 9620 Stone Avenue North, Suite 202, Seattle
Class runs from 7.00pm - 9.00pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Saturday 7 April
Canadian Interest Group
SGS Library/Office at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle (Across from NARA)
Class runs from 10.15am - 12.15pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Saturday 7 April
African American Research Challenges - Jaqueline (Jackie) E. A. Lawson and Edith Gibson Giles
National Archives Regional Administration, 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Lecture at 11.00am. Admission is free.
Visit Puget Sound Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists
for more information.

Saturday 7 April
State Focus Group: Pennsylvania
SGS Library/Office at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle (Across from NARA)
Class runs from 1.00pm - 3.00pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Monday 9 April
SGS Program Meeting: Video "Chief Seattle - Profile of an Influential Puget Sound Leader" - Sally Gene Mahoney
SGS Library/Office at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle (Across from NARA)
Class runs from 7.00pm - 9.00pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Tuesday 10 April
Put Your Family History On DVD - Donna Mullen
Olympic Room - Tacoma Public Library, 1102 Tacoma Avenue South, Tacoma
Meeting runs from 6.45pm - 8.30pm. Admission is free.
Visit Tacoma-Pierce County Genealogical Society for more information.

Wednesday 11 April
Digitized Books - Gary Zimmerman
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF) at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Wednesday 11 April
State Focus Group: Kansas
SGS Library/Office at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle (Across from NARA)
Class runs from 7.00pm - 9.00pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Thursday 12 April
TMG Users Group
Algona-Pacific Library, 255 Ellingson Rd, Pacific
Meeting runs from 1.00pm - 3.00pm. Admission is free.
Visit South King County Genealogical Society for more information.

Thursday 12 April
Finding Your Elusive Female Ancestors - Dear Myrtle aka Pat Richley
Eastside Genealogical Society - Bellevue Regional Library at 1111 110th Avenue NE, Bellevue
Meeting at 7.00pm. Supply table opens at 6.30pm.
Visit Eastside Genealogical Society for more information.

Saturday 14 April
What Is Available At A Family History Center - Jack Murphy
Heritage Quest Research Library (HQRL) at 909 Main St. Suite 5, Sumner
Class runs from 9am to 11am. Admission is FREE.
Visit Heritage Quest Research Library for more information.

Saturday 14 April
NARA Records On www.archives.gov and Other Websites
NARA-Pacific Alaska Region at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Class runs from 10.00am to 12.30pm. Admission is $10.
Visit NARA's Pacific Alaska Region for more information.

Saturday 14 April
Computer Interest Group: Library Catalogs Online - Dave Ault
SGS Library/Office at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle (Across from NARA)
Class runs from 10.30am - 12.30pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Saturday 14 April
Finding Family Photos Online
NARA-Pacific Alaska Region at 6125 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle
Class runs from 1.30pm to 4.00pm. Admission is $10.
Visit NARA's Pacific Alaska Region for more information.

Monday 16 April
Inter-Library Loans - John LaMont
Stroum Jewish Community Center, Auditorium at 3801 East Mercer Way, Mercer Island
Genealogy librarian at the Seattle Public Library.
Class runs from 7pm to 11am. Admission is free for JGSWS members, $5 for nonmembers.
Visit Jewish Genealogical Society of Washington State (JGSWS) for more information.

Tuesday 17 April
SKCGS Computer Interest Group
Auburn Library at 1102 Auburn Way S., Auburn
Meeting runs from 6.30pm - 8.30pm.Admission is free.
Visit South King County Genealogical Society for more information.

Wednesday 18 April
Panel: Strengths & Limits of Computer Genealogy - Gary Zimmerman, Dave Ault, Betty Kay Anderson
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF) at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Wednesday 18 April
State Focus Group: Maryland
SGS Library/Office at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle (Across from NARA)
Class runs from 7.00pm - 9.00pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Saturday 21 April
Irish Interest Group: "Early Modern Ireland 1532 -1690"
SGS Library/Office at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle (Across from NARA)
Class runs from 10.15am - 12.15pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Saturday 21 April
Early Kent History and What Does the Museum Provide for Genealogists - Jack Becvar
Auburn Library at 1102 Auburn Way S., Auburn
Meeting runs from 9.30am - 12.00n. Admission is free.
Visit South King County Genealogical Society for more information.

Saturday 21 April
German Interest Group: "Regions of Germany - Focus on Prussia"
SGS Library/Office at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle (Across from NARA)
Class runs from 1.00pm - 3.00pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Sunday 22 April
State Focus Group: North Carolina
SGS Library/Office at 6200 Sand Point Way N.E. #101, Seattle (Across from NARA)
Class runs from 1.00pm - 3.00pm. Admission is free.
Visit Seattle Genealogical Society Calendar of Events for more information.

Monday 23 April
SKCGS Heritage Photo Interest Group
Auburn Library at 1102 Auburn Way S., Auburn
Meeting runs from 6.30pm - 8.30pm. Admission is free.
Visit South King County Genealogical Society for more information.

Wednesday 25 April
Colonial Military Records - Karl Kumm
Fiske Genealogical Foundation and Library (FGF) at 1644 43RD Ave E, Seattle
Class runs from 10am to 12noon. Admission is $5.
Visit Fiske Library for more information.

Saturday 28 April
Animaps - Jim Johnson
Heritage Quest Research Library (HQRL) at 909 Main St. Suite 5, Sumner
Learn how to use this tool. Animaps is available at HQRL. Class runs from 9am to 11am. Admission is $10.
Visit Heritage Quest Research Library for more information.

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Wednesday, April 4, 2007

Hopelessly Addicted To The Carnival of Genealogy

Yes, I may be late to the Carnival, but I am hopelessly addicted.

So much so, I've created a Carnival Badge. It's the "I BLOG THE COG."


If you like it, be my guest, take it for a spin!

I will continue to post a Carnival of Genealogy Poster for each of the Carnivals during the year. Every one will be different, depending on the subject matter of the Carnival.

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More of The Genealogy Bloggers' Quilt

A new row has been added to the Genealogy Bloggers' Quilt. New bloggers will always appear in the quilt squares on the last row.

Monday, April 2, 2007

Life - Gotta Live It!

My fellow genealogist, David Bowles, of Writing The Westward Sagas has tagged me for a Meme. What is a Meme you ask? Meme (pronounced meem as in theme) is a unit of cultural information, such as a cultural practice or idea, that is transmitted verbally or by repeated action from one mind to another. We're transmitting this information via an internet blog, so what is a blog Meme?

A blog Meme is a type of Internet Meme that requires active participation by the blogger. It's often a series of questions that a blogger answers to share some personal perspective or experience on random topics.

David has tagged me to write a post about balance in life and link back to Lillie Ammann at A Writer’s Words, An Editor’s Eye, who is responsible for this examination of life's balance.


Ah Life![1]

My instructions are that I may answer any or all of the following questions or simply share my thoughts about life balance.

How do you achieve balance in your life?
What is your biggest challenge in balancing your life?
What are your priorities?
How have your priorities changed over time and why?
What advice can you share to help all of us balance our own lives?

O.K., I've avoided the task at hand for long enough. Those who know me personally are rolling on the floor in fits of uncontrollable laughter as they read this, as I am easily the most unbalanced (in life - not mind) person that they know. Ignore them. You know what they say, "Those who can't - teach."[2] So here goes.

I achieve balance in my life by:

- taking my work seriously, but not taking myself too seriously;
- not taking others too seriously - even when they do;
- finding the humor in my life;
- putting one foot in front of the other every morning;
- celebrating my triumphs, however small;
- Scarlett O'Haraing the bad bits;
- knowing when to say no;
- learning something new every day - I'm easily bored;
- always wanting to know what tomorrow will bring;
- having a terrific husband who is far more balanced than I.

Your time is limited, don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most importantly, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary. -STEVE JOBS

And you thought he was just another millionaire geek with a pretty face. Not!

So there you have it. My precarious balance on life.

I would like to thank David Bowles for the privelege of this morning's mental gymnastics and in turn tag Chery Kinnick, of the Nordic Blue Blog, and Nikki-ann, in Mid Wales - UK, to tell us how they do it.

_____________________


[1] "Sells Floto circus M'lle Beeson, a marvelous high wire Venus." The Strobridge Litho. Co., Cincinnati & New York, 1921. Poster. From the Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Online Catalog [reproduction number, LC-USZC4-9672 (color film copy transparency)]. http://memory.loc.gov/
cgi-bin/query/r?pp/ils:@filreq(@field(NUMBER+@band(cph+3g09672))+
@field(COLLID+cph))(accessed April 1, 2007).


[2] No teachers were intentionally injured in the posting of this article. I have never believed "Those who can't - teach." I admire and respect anyone who teaches.

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Sunday, April 1, 2007

My Ancestors Didn’t Raise No Fools – April or Otherwise - Or Did They

From the family lore I’ve gathered, it would appear that my ancestors didn’t have much of a sense of humor. They were in most cases, deadly serious (coming soon to a Blog post near you).


The perfect illustration of how “funny” my ancestors weren’t, is the following exploration of what they found to be humorous. Was it amusing? In celebration of April Fool's Day and the Carnival of Genealogy – you be the judge.

Paternal Practical Jokers

My father and his stepbrothers’ big practical joke for the year was to wander out in the dark of Halloween night and tip over outhouses. His stepbrothers, the Kitchell boys, were handsome, rowdy, lovers of honky tonk piano playing, who were always up for a good time. At least as good as they gave.

Having used my Grandmother’s outhouse in the dead of night - in October – in Missouri, I can assure you it isn’t the least bit humorous to wander out in the cold with flashlight in hand and a roll of toilet paper under your arm, only to find the outhouse on its side next to a dark smelly hole and no where to run to.

Yet, tipping over an outhouse did more than just amuse my father, it sent him into hysterics. Fortunately, we lived out in the country and had indoor plumbing, so my family wasn’t a Halloween target. My father’s stepbrothers were townies and all had outhouses. Somehow, this seems to be the exact opposite of what the plumbing situation should have been, but this was how it was and Dad set off to town every October 31st to do his tipping.



OUTWITTED - The irony in this was that while they were tipping over one brother’s outhouse, that brother was out tipping over theirs. By the end of the night, there wasn’t an outhouse standing in town and a large quantity of 3.2 beer had been consumed with nowhere to properly dispose of it. Noon the next day found the brothers righting the overturned outhouses and nursing some serious hangovers.

With the advent of indoor plumbing for the entire family, the Halloween high jinks were no more, a fact the brothers lamented every year on October 31st.

Amusing?
Consume This Blog Post With a Little 3.2 Beer

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